The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet
by Arthur Conan Doyle

"Holmes," said I as I stood one morning in our bow-window looking down the street, "here is a madman coming along. It seems rather sad that his relatives should allow him to come out alone."

My friend rose lazily from his armchair and stood with his hands in the pockets of his dressing-gown, looking over my shoulder. It was a bright, crisp February morning, and the snow of the day before still lay deep upon the ground, shimmering brightly in the wintry sun. Down the centre of Baker Street it had been ploughed into a brown crumbly band by the traffic, but at either side and on the heaped-up edges of the foot-paths it still lay as white as when it fell. The grey pavement had been cleaned and scraped, but was still dangerously slippery, so that there were fewer passengers than usual. Indeed, from the direction of the Metropolitan Station no one was coming save the single gentleman whose eccentric conduct had drawn my attention.

He was a man of about fifty, tall, portly, and imposing, with a massive, strongly marked face and a commanding figure. He was dressed in a sombre yet rich style, in black frock-coat, shining hat, neat brown gaiters, and well-cut pearl-gray trousers. Yet his actions were in absurd contrast to the dignity of his dress and features, for he was running hard, with occasional little springs, such as a weary man gives who is little accustomed to set any tax upon his legs. As he ran he jerked his hands up and down, waggled his head, and writhed his face into the most extraordinary contortions.

"What on earth can be the matter with him?" I asked. "He is looking up at the numbers of the houses."

"I believe that he is coming here," said Holmes, rubbing his hands.

"Here?"

"Yes; I rather think he is coming to consult me professionally. I think that I recognise the symptoms. Ha! did I not tell you?" As he spoke, the man, puffing and blowing, rushed at our door and pulled at our bell until the whole house resounded with the clanging.

A few moments later he was in our room, still puffing, still gesticulating, but with so fixed a look of grief and despair in his eyes that our smiles were turned in an instant to horror and pity. For a while he could not get his words out, but swayed his body and plucked at his hair like one who has been driven to the extreme limits of his reason. Then, suddenly springing to his feet, he beat his head against the wall with such force that we both rushed upon him and tore him away to the centre of the room. Sherlock Holmes pushed him down into the easy-chair and, sitting beside him, patted his hand and chatted with him in the easy, soothing tones which he knew so well how to employ.

"You have come to me to tell your story, have you not?" said he. "You are fatigued with your haste. Pray wait until you have recovered yourself, and then I shall be most happy to look into any little problem which you may submit to me."

The man sat for a minute or more with a heaving chest, fighting against his emotion. Then he passed his handkerchief over his brow, set his lips tight, and turned his face towards us.

"No doubt you think me mad?" said he.

"I see that you have had some great trouble," responded Holmes.

"God knows I have!--a trouble which is enough to unseat my reason, so sudden and so terrible is it. Public disgrace I might have faced, although I am a man whose character has never yet borne a stain. Private affliction also is the lot of every man; but the two coming together, and in so frightful a form, have been enough to shake my very soul. Besides, it is not I alone. The very noblest in the land may suffer unless some way be found out of this horrible affair."

"Pray compose yourself, sir," said Holmes, "and let me have a clear account of who you are and what it is that has befallen you."

"My name," answered our visitor, "is probably familiar to your ears. I am Alexander Holder, of the banking firm of Holder & Stevenson, of Threadneedle Street."

The name was indeed well known to us as belonging to the senior partner in the second largest private banking concern in the City of London. What could have happened, then, to bring one of the foremost citizens of London to this most pitiable pass? We waited, all curiosity, until with another effort he braced himself to tell his story.

"I feel that time is of value," said he; "that is why I hastened here when the police inspector suggested that I should secure your co-operation. I came to Baker Street by the Underground and hurried from there on foot, for the cabs go slowly through this snow. That is why I was so out of breath, for I am a man who takes very little exercise. I feel better now, and I will put the facts before you as shortly and yet as clearly as I can.

"It is, of course, well known to you that in a successful banking business as much depends upon our being able to find remunerative investments for our funds as upon our increasing our connection and the number of our depositors. One of our most lucrative means of laying out money is in the shape of loans, where the security is unimpeachable. We have done a good deal in this direction during the last few years, and there are many noble families to whom we have advanced large sums upon the security of their pictures, libraries, or plate.

"Yesterday morning I was seated in my office at the bank when a card was brought in to me by one of the clerks. I started when I saw the name, for it was that of none other than--well, perhaps even to you I had better say no more than that it was a name which is a household word all over the earth--one of the highest, noblest, most exalted names in England. I was overwhelmed by the honour and attempted, when he entered, to say so, but he plunged at once into business with the air of a man who wishes to hurry quickly through a disagreeable task.

"'Mr. Holder,' said he, 'I have been informed that you are in the habit of advancing money.'

"'The firm does so when the security is good.' I answered.

"'It is absolutely essential to me,' said he, 'that I should have 50,000 pounds at once. I could, of course, borrow so trifling a sum ten times over from my friends, but I much prefer to make it a matter of business and to carry out that business myself. In my position you can readily understand that it is unwise to place one's self under obligations.'

"'For how long, may I ask, do you want this sum?' I asked.

"'Next Monday I have a large sum due to me, and I shall then most certainly repay what you advance, with whatever interest you think it right to charge. But it is very essential to me that the money should be paid at once.'

"'I should be happy to advance it without further parley from my own private purse,' said I, 'were it not that the strain would be rather more than it could bear. If, on the other hand, I am to do it in the name of the firm, then in justice to my partner I must insist that, even in your case, every businesslike precaution should be taken.'

"'I should much prefer to have it so,' said he, raising up a square, black morocco case which he had laid beside his chair. 'You have doubtless heard of the Beryl Coronet?'

"'One of the most precious public possessions of the empire,' said I.

"'Precisely.' He opened the case, and there, imbedded in soft, flesh-coloured velvet, lay the magnificent piece of jewellery which he had named. 'There are thirty-nine enormous beryls,' said he, 'and the price of the gold chasing is incalculable. The lowest estimate would put the worth of the coronet at double the sum which I have asked. I am prepared to leave it with you as my security.'

"I took the precious case into my hands and looked in some perplexity from it to my illustrious client.

"'You doubt its value?' he asked.

"'Not at all. I only doubt --'

"'The propriety of my leaving it. You may set your mind at rest about that. I should not dream of doing so were it not absolutely certain that I should be able in four days to reclaim it. It is a pure matter of form. Is the security sufficient?'

"'Ample.'

"'You understand, Mr. Holder, that I am giving you a strong proof of the confidence which I have in you, founded upon all that I have heard of you. I rely upon you not only to be discreet and to refrain from all gossip upon the matter but, above all, to preserve this coronet with every possible precaution because I need not say that a great public scandal would be caused if any harm were to befall it. Any injury to it would be almost as serious as its complete loss, for there are no beryls in the world to match these, and it would be impossible to replace them. I leave it with you, however, with every confidence, and I shall call for it in person on Monday morning.'

"Seeing that my client was anxious to leave, I said no more but, calling for my cashier, I ordered him to pay over fifty 1000 pound notes. When I was alone once more, however, with the precious case lying upon the table in front of me, I could not but think with some misgivings of the immense responsibility which it entailed upon me. There could be no doubt that, as it was a national possession, a horrible scandal would ensue if any misfortune should occur to it. I already regretted having ever consented to take charge of it. However, it was too late to alter the matter now, so I locked it up in my private safe and turned once more to my work.

"When evening came I felt that it would be an imprudence to leave so precious a thing in the office behind me. Bankers' safes had been forced before now, and why should not mine be? If so, how terrible would be the position in which I should find myself! I determined, therefore, that for the next few days I would always carry the case backward and forward with me, so that it might never be really out of my reach. With this intention, I called a cab and drove out to my house at Streatham, carrying the jewel with me. I did not breathe freely until I had taken it upstairs and locked it in the bureau of my dressing-room.

"And now a word as to my household, Mr. Holmes, for I wish you to thoroughly understand the situation. My groom and my page sleep out of the house, and may be set aside altogether. I have three maid-servants who have been with me a number of years and whose absolute reliability is quite above suspicion. Another, Lucy Parr, the second waiting-maid, has only been in my service a few months. She came with an excellent character, however, and has always given me satisfaction. She is a very pretty girl and has attracted admirers who have occasionally hung about the place. That is the only drawback which we have found to her, but we believe her to be a thoroughly good girl in every way.

"So much for the servants. My family itself is so small that it will not take me long to describe it. I am a widower and have an only son, Arthur. He has been a disappointment to me, Mr. Holmes-- a grievous disappointment. I have no doubt that I am myself to blame. People tell me that I have spoiled him. Very likely I have. When my dear wife died I felt that he was all I had to love. I could not bear to see the smile fade even for a moment from his face. I have never denied him a wish. Perhaps it would have been better for both of us had I been sterner, but I meant it for the best.

"It was naturally my intention that he should succeed me in my business, but he was not of a business turn. He was wild, wayward, and, to speak the truth, I could not trust him in the handling of large sums of money. When he was young he became a member of an aristocratic club, and there, having charming manners, he was soon the intimate of a number of men with long purses and expensive habits. He learned to play heavily at cards and to squander money on the turf, until he had again and again to come to me and implore me to give him an advance upon his allowance, that he might settle his debts of honour. He tried more than once to break away from the dangerous company which he was keeping, but each time the influence of his friend, Sir George Burnwell, was enough to draw him back again.

"And, indeed, I could not wonder that such a man as Sir George Burnwell should gain an influence over him, for he has frequently brought him to my house, and I have found myself that I could hardly resist the fascination of his manner. He is older than Arthur, a man of the world to his finger-tips, one who had been everywhere, seen everything, a brilliant talker, and a man of great personal beauty. Yet when I think of him in cold blood, far away from the glamour of his presence, I am convinced from his cynical speech and the look which I have caught in his eyes that he is one who should be deeply distrusted. So I think, and so, too, thinks my little Mary, who has a woman's quick insight into character.

"And now there is only she to be described. She is my niece; but when my brother died five years ago and left her alone in the world I adopted her, and have looked upon her ever since as my daughter. She is a sunbeam in my house--sweet, loving, beautiful, a wonderful manager and housekeeper, yet as tender and quiet and gentle as a woman could be. She is my right hand. I do not know what I could do without her. In only one matter has she ever gone against my wishes. Twice my boy has asked her to marry him, for he loves her devotedly, but each time she has refused him. I think that if anyone could have drawn him into the right path it would have been she, and that his marriage might have changed his whole life; but now, alas! it is too late--forever too late!

 

"Now, Mr. Holmes, you know the people who live under my roof, and I shall continue with my miserable story.

"When we were taking coffee in the drawing-room that night after dinner, I told Arthur and Mary my experience, and of the precious treasure which we had under our roof, suppressing only the name of my client. Lucy Parr, who had brought in the coffee, had, I am sure, left the room; but I cannot swear that the door was closed. Mary and Arthur were much interested and wished to see the famous coronet, but I thought it better not to disturb it.

"'Where have you put it?' asked Arthur.

"'In my own bureau.'

"'Well, I hope to goodness the house won't be burgled during the night.' said he.

"'It is locked up,' I answered.

"'Oh, any old key will fit that bureau. When I was a youngster I have opened it myself with the key of the box-room cupboard.'

"He often had a wild way of talking, so that I thought little of what he said. He followed me to my room, however, that night with a very grave face.

"'Look here, dad,' said he with his eyes cast down, 'can you let me have 200 pounds?'

"'No, I cannot!' I answered sharply. 'I have been far too generous with you in money matters.'

"'You have been very kind,' said he, 'but I must have this money, or else I can never show my face inside the club again.'

"'And a very good thing, too!' I cried.

"'Yes, but you would not have me leave it a dishonoured man,' said he. 'I could not bear the disgrace. I must raise the money in some way, and if you will not let me have it, then I must try other means.'

"I was very angry, for this was the third demand during the month. 'You shall not have a farthing from me,' I cried, on which he bowed and left the room without another word.

"When he was gone I unlocked my bureau, made sure that my treasure was safe, and locked it again. Then I started to go round the house to see that all was secure--a duty which I usually leave to Mary but which I thought it well to perform myself that night. As I came down the stairs I saw Mary herself at the side window of the hall, which she closed and fastened as I approached.

"'Tell me, dad,' said she, looking, I thought, a little disturbed, 'did you give Lucy, the maid, leave to go out to-night?'

"'Certainly not.'

"'She came in just now by the back door. I have no doubt that she has only been to the side gate to see someone, but I think that it is hardly safe and should be stopped.'

"'You must speak to her in the morning, or I will if you prefer it. Are you sure that everything is fastened?'

"'Quite sure, dad.'

"'Then. good-night.' I kissed her and went up to my bedroom again, where I was soon asleep.

"I am endeavouring to tell you everything, Mr. Holmes, which may have any bearing upon the case, but I beg that you will question me upon any point which I do not make clear."

"On the contrary, your statement is singularly lucid."

"I come to a part of my story now in which I should wish to be particularly so. I am not a very heavy sleeper, and the anxiety in my mind tended, no doubt, to make me even less so than usual. About two in the morning, then, I was awakened by some sound in the house. It had ceased ere I was wide awake, but it had left an impression behind it as though a window had gently closed somewhere. I lay listening with all my ears. Suddenly, to my horror, there was a distinct sound of footsteps moving softly in the next room. I slipped out of bed, all palpitating with fear, and peeped round the comer of my dressing-room door.

"'Arthur!' I screamed, 'you villain! you thief! How dare you touch that coronet?'

"The gas was half up, as I had left it, and my unhappy boy, dressed only in his shirt and trousers, was standing beside the light, holding the coronet in his hands. He appeared to be wrenching at it, or bending it with all his strength. At my cry he dropped it from his grasp and turned as pale as death. I snatched it up and examined it. One of the gold corners, with three of the beryls in it, was missing.

"'You blackguard!' I shouted, beside myself with rage. 'You have destroyed it! You have dishonoured me forever! Where are the jewels which you have stolen?'

"'Stolen!' he cried.

"'Yes, thief!' I roared, shaking him by the shoulder.

"'There are none missing. There cannot be any missing,' said he.

"'There are three missing. And you know where they are. Must I call you a liar as well as a thief? Did I not see you trying to tear off another piece?'

"'You have called me names enough,' said he, 'I will not stand it any longer. I shall not say another word about this business, since you have chosen to insult me. I will leave your house in the morning and make my own way in the world.'

"'You shall leave it in the hands of the police!' I cried half-mad with grief and rage. 'I shall have this matter probed to the bottom.'

"'You shall learn nothing from me,' said he with a passion such as I should not have thought was in his nature. 'If you choose to call the police, let the police find what they can.'

"By this time the whole house was astir, for I had raised my voice in my anger. Mary was the first to rush into my room, and, at the sight of the coronet and of Arthur's face, she read the whole story and, with a scream, fell down senseless on the ground. I sent the house-maid for the police and put the investigation into their hands at once. When the inspector and a constable entered the house, Arthur, who had stood sullenly with his arms folded, asked me whether it was my intention to charge him with theft. I answered that it had ceased to be a private matter, but had become a public one, since the ruined coronet was national property. I was determined that the law should have its way in everything.

"'At least,' said he, 'you will not have me arrested at once. It would be to your advantage as well as mine if I might leave the house for five minutes.'

"'That you may get away, or perhaps that you may conceal what you have stolen,' said I. And then, realising the dreadful position in which I was placed, I implored him to remember that not only my honour but that of one who was far greater than I was at stake; and that he threatened to raise a scandal which would convulse the nation. He might avert it all if he would but tell me what he had done with the three missing stones.

"'You may as well face the matter,' said I; 'you have been caught in the act, and no confession could make your guilt more heinous. If you but make such reparation as is in your power, by telling us where the beryls are, all shall be forgiven and forgotten.'

"'Keep your forgiveness for those who ask for it,' he answered, turning away from me with a sneer. I saw that he was too hardened for any words of mine to influence him. There was but one way for it. I called in the inspector and gave him into custody. A search was made at once not only of his person but of his room and of every portion of the house where he could possibly have concealed the gems; but no trace of them could be found, nor would the wretched boy open his mouth for all our persuasions and our threats. This morning he was removed to a cell, and I, after going through all the police formalities, have hurried round to you to implore you to use your skill in unravelling the matter. The police have openly confessed that they can at present make nothing of it. You may go to any expense which you think necessary. I have already offered a reward of 1000 pounds. My God, what shall I do! I have lost my honour, my gems, and my son in one night. Oh, what shall I do!"

He put a hand on either side of his head and rocked himself to and fro, droning to himself like a child whose grief has got beyond words.

Sherlock Holmes sat silent for some few minutes, with his brows knitted and his eyes fixed upon the fire.

"Do you receive much company?" he asked.

"None save my partner with his family and an occasional friend of Arthur's. Sir George Burnwell has been several times lately. No one else, I think."

"Do you go out much in society?"

"Arthur does. Mary and I stay at home. We neither of us care for it."

"That is unusual in a young girl."

"She is of a quiet nature. Besides, she is not so very young. She is four-and-twenty."

"This matter, from what you say, seems to have been a shock to her also."

"Terrible! She is even more affected than I."

"You have neither of you any doubt as to your son's guilt?"

"How can we have when I saw him with my own eyes with the coronet in his hands."

"I hardly consider that a conclusive proof. Was the remainder of the coronet at all injured?"

"Yes, it was twisted."

"Do you not think, then, that he might have been trying to straighten it?"

"God bless you! You are doing what you can for him and for me. But it is too heavy a task. What was he doing there at all? If his purpose were innocent, why did he not say so?"

"Precisely. And if it were guilty, why did he not invent a lie? His silence appears to me to cut both ways. There are several singular points about the case. What did the police think of the noise which awoke you from your sleep?"

"They considered that it might be caused by Arthur's closing his bedroom door."

"A likely story! As if a man bent on felony would slam his door so as to wake a household. What did they say, then, of the disappearance of these gems?"

"They are still sounding the planking and probing the furniture in the hope of finding them."

"Have they thought of looking outside the house?"

"Yes, they have shown extraordinary energy. The whole garden has already been minutely examined."

"Now, my dear sir," said Holmes. "is it not obvious to you now that this matter really strikes very much deeper than either you or the police were at first inclined to think? It appeared to you to be a simple case; to me it seems exceedingly complex. Consider what is involved by your theory. You suppose that your son came down from his bed, went, at great risk, to your dressing-room, opened your bureau, took out your coronet, broke off by main force a small portion of it, went off to some other place, concealed three gems out of the thirty-nine, with such skill that nobody can find them, and then returned with the other thirty-six into the room in which he exposed himself to the greatest danger of being discovered. I ask you now, is such a theory tenable?"

"But what other is there?" cried the banker with a gesture of despair. "If his motives were innocent, why does he not explain them?"

"It is our task to find that out," replied Holmes; "so now, if you please, Mr. Holder, we will set off for Streatham together, and devote an hour to glancing a little more closely into details."

My friend insisted upon my accompanying them in their expedition, which I was eager enough to do, for my curiosity and sympathy were deeply stirred by the story to which we had listened. I confess that the guilt of the banker's son appeared to me to be as obvious as it did to his unhappy father, but still I had such faith in Holmes's judgement that I felt that there must be some grounds for hope as long as he was dissatisfied with the accepted explanation. He hardly spoke a word the whole way out to the southern suburb, but sat with his chin upon his breast and his hat drawn over his eyes, sunk in the deepest thought. Our client appeared to have taken fresh heart at the little glimpse of hope which had been presented to him, and he even broke into a desultory chat with me over his business affairs. A short railway journey and a shorter walk brought us to Fairbank, the modest residence of the great financier.

Fairbank was a good-sized square house of white stone, standing back a little from the road. A double carriage-sweep, with a snow-clad lawn, stretched down in front to two large iron gates which closed the entrance. On the right side was a small wooden thicket, which led into a narrow path between two neat hedges stretching from the road to the kitchen door, and forming the tradesmen's entrance. On the left ran a lane which led to the stables, and was not itself within the grounds at all, being a public, though little used, thoroughfare. Holmes left us standing at the door and walked slowly all round the house, across the front, down the tradesmen's path, and so round by the garden behind into the stable lane. So long was he that Mr. Holder and I went into the dining-room and waited by the fire until he should return. We were sitting there in silence when the door opened and a young lady came in. She was rather above the middle height, slim, with dark hair and eyes, which seemed the darker against the absolute pallor of her skin. I do not think that I have ever seen such deadly paleness in a woman's face. Her lips, too, were bloodless, but her eyes were flushed with crying. As she swept silently into the room she impressed me with a greater sense of grief than the banker had done in the morning, and it was the more striking in her as she was evidently a woman of strong character, with immense capacity for self-restraint. Disregarding my presence, she went straight to her uncle and passed her hand over his head with a sweet womanly caress.

"You have given orders that Arthur should be liberated, have you not, dad?" she asked.

"No, no, my girl, the matter must be probed to the bottom."

"But I am so sure that he is innocent. You know what woman's instincts are. I know that he has done no harm and that you will be sorry for having acted so harshly."

"Why is he silent, then, if he is innocent?"

"Who knows? Perhaps because he was so angry that you should suspect him."

"How could I help suspecting him, when I actually saw him with the coronet in his hand?"

"Oh, but he had only picked it up to look at it. Oh, do, do take my word for it that he is innocent. Let the matter drop and say no more. It is so dreadful to think of our dear Arthur in prison!"

"I shall never let it drop until the gems are found--never, Mary! Your affection for Arthur blinds you as to the awful consequences to me. Far from hushing the thing up, I have brought a gentleman down from London to inquire more deeply into it."

"This gentleman?" she asked, facing round to me.

"No, his friend. He wished us to leave him alone. He is round in the stable lane now."

"The stable lane?" She raised her dark eyebrows. "What can he hope to find there? Ah! this, I suppose, is he. I trust, sir, that you will succeed in proving, what I feel sure is the truth, that my cousin Arthur is innocent of this crime."

"I fully share your opinion, and I trust, with you, that we may prove it," returned Holmes, going back to the mat to knock the snow from his shoes. "I believe I have the honour of addressing Miss Mary Holder. Might I ask you a question or two?"

"Pray do, sir, if it may help to clear this horrible affair up."

"You heard nothing yourself last night?"

"Nothing, until my uncle here began to speak loudly. I heard that, and I came down."

"You shut up the windows and doors the night before. Did you fasten all the windows?"

"Yes."

"Were they all fastened this morning?"

"Yes."

"You have a maid who has a sweetheart? I think that you remarked to your uncle last night that she had been out to see him?"

"Yes, and she was the girl who waited in the drawing-room. and who may have heard uncle's remarks about the coronet."

"I see. You infer that she may have gone out to tell her sweetheart, and that the two may have planned the robbery."

"But what is the good of all these vague theories," cried the banker impatiently, "when I have told you that I saw Arthur with the coronet in his hands?"

"Wait a little, Mr. Holder. We must come back to that. About this girl, Miss Holder. You saw her return by the kitchen door, I presume?"

"Yes; when I went to see if the door was fastened for the night I met her slipping in. I saw the man, too, in the gloom."

"Do you know him?"

"Oh, yes! he is the green-grocer who brings our vegetables round. His name is Francis Prosper."

"He stood," said Holmes, "to the left of the door--that is to say, farther up the path than is necessary to reach the door?"

"Yes, he did."

"And he is a man with a wooden leg?"

Something like fear sprang up in the young lady's expressive black eyes. "Why, you are like a magician," said she. "How do you know that?" She smiled, but there was no answering smile in Holmes's thin, eager face.

"I should be very glad now to go upstairs," said he. "I shall probably wish to go over the outside of the house again. Perhaps I had better take a look at the lower windows before I go up."

He walked swiftly round from one to the other, pausing only at the large one which looked from the hall onto the stable lane. This he opened and made a very careful examination of the sill with his powerful magnifying lens. "Now we shall go upstairs," said he at last.

The banker's dressing-room was a plainly furnished little chamber, with a grey carpet, a large bureau, and a long mirror. Holmes went to the bureau first and looked hard at the lock.

"Which key was used to open it?" he asked.

"That which my son himself indicated--that of the cupboard of the lumber-room."

"Have you it here?"

"That is it on the dressing-table."

Sherlock Holmes took it up and opened the bureau.

"It is a noiseless lock," said he. "It is no wonder that it did not wake you. This case, I presume, contains the coronet. We must have a look at it." He opened the case, and taking out the diadem he laid it upon the table. It was a magnificent specimen of the jeweller's art, and the thirty-six stones were the finest that I have ever seen. At one side of the coronet was a cracked edge, where a corner holding three gems had been torn away.

"Now, Mr. Holder," said Holmes, "here is the corner which corresponds to that which has been so unfortunately lost. Might I beg that you will break it off."

The banker recoiled in horror. "I should not dream of trying," said he.

"Then I will." Holmes suddenly bent his strength upon it, but without result. "I feel it give a little," said he; "but, though I am exceptionally strong in the fingers, it would take me all my time to break it. An ordinary man could not do it. Now, what do you think would happen if I did break it, Mr. Holder? There would be a noise like a pistol shot. Do you tell me that all this happened within a few yards of your bed and that you heard nothing of it?"

"I do not know what to think. It is all dark to me."

"But perhaps it may grow lighter as we go. What do you think, Miss Holder?"

"I confess that I still share my uncle's perplexity."

"Your son had no shoes or slippers on when you saw him?"

"He had nothing on save only his trousers and shirt."

"Thank you. We have certainly been favoured with extraordinary luck during this inquiry, and it will be entirely our own fault if we do not succeed in clearing the matter up. With your pemmission, Mr. Holder, I shall now continue my investigations outside."

He went alone, at his own request, for he explained that any unnecessary footmarks might make his task more difficult. For an hour or more he was at work, returning at last with his feet heavy with snow and his features as inscrutable as ever.

"I think that I have seen now all that there is to see, Mr. Holder," said he; "I can serve you best by returning to my rooms."

"But the gems, Mr. Holmes. Where are they?"

"I cannot tell."

The banker wrung his hands. "I shall never see them again!" he cried. "And my son? You give me hopes?"

"My opinion is in no way altered."

"Then, for God's sake, what was this dark business which was acted in my house last night?"

"If you can call upon me at my Baker Street rooms tomorrow morning between nine and ten I shall be happy to do what I can to make it clearer. I understand that you give me carte blanche to act for you, provided only that I get back the gems, and that you place no limit on the sum I may draw."

"I would give my fortune to have them back."

"Very good. I shall look into the matter between this and then. Good-bye; it is just possible that I may have to come over here again before evening."

It was obvious to me that my companion's mind was now made up about the case, although what his conclusions were was more than I could even dimly imagine. Several times during our homeward journey I endeavoured to sound him upon the point, but he always glided away to some other topic, until at last I gave it over in despair. It was not yet three when we found ourselves in our rooms once more. He hurried to his chamber and was down again in a few minutes dressed as a common loafer. With his collar turned up, his shiny, seedy coat, his red cravat, and his worn boots, he was a perfect sample of the class.

"I think that this should do," said he, glancing into the glass above the fireplace. "I only wish that you could come with me, Watson, but I fear that it won't do. I may be on the trail in this matter, or I may be following a will-o'-the-wisp, but I shall soon know which it is. I hope that I may be back in a few hours." He cut a slice of beef from the joint upon the sideboard, sandwiched it between two rounds of bread, and thrusting this rude meal into his pocket he started off upon his expedition.

I had just finished my tea when he returned, evidently in excellent spirits, swinging an old elastic-sided boot in his hand. He chucked it down into a corner and helped himself to a cup of tea.

"I only looked in as I passed," said he. "I am going right on."

"Where to?"

"Oh, to the other side of the West End. It may be some time before I get back. Don't wait up for me in case I should be late."

"How are you getting on?"

"Oh, so so. Nothing to complain of. I have been out to Streatham since I saw you last, but I did not call at the house. It is a very sweet little problem, and I would not have missed it for a good deal. However, I must not sit gossiping here, but must get these disreputable clothes off and return to my highly respectable self."

I could see by his manner that he had stronger reasons for satisfaction than his words alone would imply. His eyes twinkled, and there was even a touch of colour upon his sallow cheeks. He hastened upstairs, and a few minutes later I heard the slam of the hall door, which told me that he was off once more upon his congenial hunt.

I waited until midnight, but there was no sign of his return, so I retired to my room. It was no uncommon thing for him to be away for days and nights on end when he was hot upon a scent, so that his lateness caused me no surprise. I do not know at what hour he came in, but when I came down to breakfast in the morning there he was with a cup of coffee in one hand and the paper in the other, as fresh and trim as possible.

"You will excuse my beginning without you, Watson," said he, "but you remember that our client has rather an early appointment this morning."

"Why, it is after nine now," I answered. "I should not be surprised if that were he. I thought I heard a ring."

It was, indeed, our friend the financier. I was shocked by the change which had come over him, for his face which was naturally of a broad and massive mould, was now pinched and fallen in, while his hair seemed to me at least a shade whiter. He entered with a weariness and lethargy which was even more painful than his violence of the morning before, and he dropped heavily into the armchair which I pushed forward for him.

"I do not know what I have done to be so severely tried," said he. "Only two days ago I was a happy and prosperous man, without a care in the world. Now I am left to a lonely and dishonoured age. One sorrow comes close upon the heels of another. My niece, Mary, has deserted me."

"Deserted you?"

"Yes. Her bed this morning had not been slept in, her room was empty, and a note for me lay upon the hall table. I had said to her last night, in sorrow and not in anger, that if she had married my boy all might have been well with him. Perhaps it was thoughtless of me to say so. It is to that remark that she refers in this note:

"'My Dearest Uncle:--I feel that I have brought trouble upon you, and that if I had acted differently this terrible misfortune might never have occurred. I cannot, with this thought in my mind, ever again be happy under your roof, and I feel that I must leave you forever. Do not worry about my future, for that is provided for; and, above all, do not search for me, for it will be fruitless labour and an ill-service to me. In life or in death, I am ever your loving MARY.'

"What could she mean by that note, Mr. Holmes? Do you think it points to suicide?"

"No, no, nothing of the kind. It is perhaps the best possible solution. I trust, Mr. Holder, that you are nearing the end of your troubles."

"Ha! You say so! You have heard something, Mr. Holmes; you have learned something! Where are the gems?"

"You would not think 1000 pounds apiece an excessive sum for them?"

"I would pay ten."

"That would be unnecessary. Three thousand will cover the matter. And there is a little reward, I fancy. Have you your check-book? Here is a pen. Better make it out for 4000 pounds."

With a dazed face the banker made out the required check. Holmes walked over to his desk, took out a little triangular piece of gold with three gems in it, and threw it down upon the table.

With a shriek of joy our client clutched it up.

"You have it!" he gasped. "I am saved! I am saved!"

The reaction of joy was as passionate as his grief had been, and he hugged his recovered gems to his bosom.

"There is one other thing you owe, Mr. Holder," said Sherlock Holmes rather sternly.

"Owe!" He caught up a pen. "Name the sum, and I will pay it."

"No, the debt is not to me. You owe a very humble apology to that noble lad, your son, who has carried himself in this matter as I should be proud to see my own son do, should I ever chance to have one."

"Then it was not Arthur who took them?"

"I told you yesterday, and I repeat today, that it was not."

"You are sure of it! Then let us hurry to him at once to let him know that the truth is known."

"He knows it already. When I had cleared it all up I had an interview with him, and finding that he would not tell me the story, I told it to him, on which he had to confess that I was right and to add the very few details which were not yet quite clear to me. Your news of this morning, however, may open his lips."

"For heaven's sake, tell me, then, what is this extraordinary mystery !"

"I will do so, and I will show you the steps by which I reached it. And let me say to you, first, that which it is hardest for me to say and for you to hear: there has been an understanding between Sir George Burnwell and your niece Mary. They have now fled together."

"My Mary? Impossible!"

"It is unfortunately more than possible; it is certain. Neither you nor your son knew the true character of this man when you admitted him into your family circle. He is one of the most dangerous men in England--a ruined gambler, an absolutely desperate villain, a man without heart or conscience. Your niece knew nothing of such men. When he breathed his vows to her, as he had done to a hundred before her, she flattered herself that she alone had touched his heart. The devil knows best what he said, but at least she became his tool and was in the habit of seeing him nearly every evening."

"I cannot, and I will not, believe it!" cried the banker with an ashen face.

"I will tell you, then, what occurred in your house last night. Your niece, when you had, as she thought, gone to your room. slipped down and talked to her lover through the window which leads into the stable lane. His footmarks had pressed right through the snow, so long had he stood there. She told him of the coronet. His wicked lust for gold kindled at the news, and he bent her to his will. I have no doubt that she loved you, but there are women in whom the love of a lover extinguishes all other loves, and I think that she must have been one. She had hardly listened to his instructions when she saw you coming downstairs, on which she closed the window rapidly and told you about one of the servants' escapade with her wooden-legged lover, which was all perfectly true.

"Your boy, Arthur, went to bed after his interview with you but he slept badly on account of his uneasiness about his club debts. In the middle of the night he heard a soft tread pass his door, so he rose and, looking out, was surprised to see his cousin walking very stealthily along the passage until she disappeared into your dressing-room. Petrified with astonishment the lad slipped on some clothes and waited there in the dark to see what would come of this strange affair. Presently she emerged from the room again, and in the light of the passage-lamp your son saw that she carried the precious coronet in her hands. She passed down the stairs, and he, thrilling with horror, ran along and slipped behind the curtain near your door, whence he could see what passed in the hall beneath. He saw her stealthily open the window, hand out the coronet to someone in the gloom, and then closing it once more hurry back to her room, passing quite close to where he stood hid behind the curtain.

"As long as she was on the scene he could not take any action without a horrible exposure of the woman whom he loved. But the instant that she was gone he realised how crushing a misfortune this would be for you, and how all-important it was to set it right. He rushed down, just as he was, in his bare feet, opened the window, sprang out into the snow, and ran down the lane, where he could see a dark figure in the moonlight. Sir George Burnwell tried to get away, but Arthur caught him, and there was a struggle between them, your lad tugging at one side of the coronet, and his opponent at the other. In the scuffle, your son struck Sir George and cut him over the eye. Then something suddenly snapped, and your son, finding that he had the coronet in his hands, rushed back, closed the window, ascended to your room, and had just observed that the coronet had been twisted in the struggle and was endeavouring to straighten it when you appeared upon the scene."

"Is it possible?" gasped the banker.

"You then roused his anger by calling him names at a moment when he felt that he had deserved your warmest thanks. He could not explain the true state of affairs without betraying one who certainly deserved little enough consideration at his hands. He took the more chivalrous view, however, and preserved her secret."

"And that was why she shrieked and fainted when she saw the coronet," cried Mr. Holder. "Oh, my God! what a blind fool I have been! And his asking to be allowed to go out for five minutes! The dear fellow wanted to see if the missing piece were at the scene of the struggle. How cruelly I have misjudged him!'

"When I arrived at the house," continued Holmes, "I at once went very carefully round it to observe if there were any traces in the snow which might help me. I knew that none had fallen since the evening before, and also that there had been a strong frost to preserve impressions. I passed along the tradesmen's path, but found it all trampled down and indistinguishable. Just beyond it, however, at the far side of the kitchen door, a woman had stood and talked with a man, whose round impressions on one side showed that he had a wooden leg. I could even tell that they had been disturbed, for the woman had run back swiftly to the door, as was shown by the deep toe and light heel marks, while Wooden-leg had waited a little, and then had gone away. I thought at the time that this might be the maid and her sweetheart, of whom you had already spoken to me, and inquiry showed it was so. I passed round the garden without seeing anything more than random tracks, which I took to be the police; but when I got into the stable lane a very long and complex story was written in the snow in front of me.

"There was a double line of tracks of a booted man, and a second double line which I saw with delight belonged to a man with naked feet. I was at once convinced from what you had told me that the latter was your son. The first had walked both ways, but the other had run swiftly, and as his tread was marked in places over the depression of the boot, it was obvious that he had passed after the other. I followed them up and found they led to the hall window, where Boots had worn all the snow away while waiting. Then I walked to the other end, which was a hundred yards or more down the lane. I saw where Boots had faced round, where the snow was cut up as though there had been a struggle, and, finally, where a few drops of blood had fallen, to show me that I was not mistaken. Boots had then run down the lane, and another little smudge of blood showed that it was he who had been hurt. When he came to the highroad at the other end, I found that the pavement had been cleared, so there was an end to that clew.

"On entering the house, however, I examined, as you remember, the sill and framework of the hall window with my lens, and I could at once see that someone had passed out. I could distinguish the outline of an instep where the wet foot had been placed in coming in. I was then beginning to be able to form an opinion as to what had occurred. A man had waited outside the window; someone had brought the gems; the deed had been overseen by your son; he had pursued the thief; had struggled with him; they had each tugged at the coronet, their united strength causing injuries which neither alone could have effected. He had returned with the prize, but had left a fragment in the grasp of his opponent. So far I was clear. The question now was, who was the man and who was it brought him the coronet?

"It is an old maxim of mine that when you have excluded the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth. Now, I knew that it was not you who had brought it down, so there only remained your niece and the maids. But if it were the maids, why should your son allow himself to be accused in their place? There could be no possible reason. As he loved his cousin, however, there was an excellent explanation why he should retain her secret--the more so as the secret was a disgraceful one. When I remembered that you had seen her at that window, and how she had fainted on seeing the coronet again, my conjecture became a certainty.

"And who could it be who was her confederate? A lover evidently, for who else could outweigh the love and gratitude which she must feel to you? I knew that you went out little, and that your circle of friends was a very limited one. But among them was Sir George Burnwell. I had heard of him before as being a man of evil reputation among women. It must have been he who wore those boots and retained the missing gems. Even though he knew that Arthur had discovered him, he might still flatter himself that he was safe, for the lad could not say a word without compromising his own family.

"Well, your own good sense will suggest what measures I took next. I went in the shape of a loafer to Sir George's house, managed to pick up an acquaintance with his valet, learned that his master had cut his head the night before, and, finally, at the expense of six shillings, made all sure by buying a pair of his cast-off shoes. With these I journeyed down to Streatham and saw that they exactly fitted the tracks."

"I saw an ill-dressed vagabond in the lane yesterday evening," said Mr. Holder.

"Precisely. It was I. I found that I had my man, so I came home and changed my clothes. It was a delicate part which I had to play then, for I saw that a prosecution must be avoided to avert scandal, and I knew that so astute a villain would see that our hands were tied in the matter. I went and saw him. At first, of course, he denied everything. But when I gave him every particular that had occurred, he tried to bluster and took down a life-preserver from the wall. I knew my man, however, and I clapped a pistol to his head before he could strike. Then he became a little more reasonable. I told him that we would give him a price for the stones he held. 1000 pounds apiece. That brought out the first signs of grief that he had shown. 'Why, dash it all!' said he, 'I've let them go at six hundred for the three!' I soon managed to get the address of the receiver who had them, on promising him that there would be no prosecution. Off I set to him, and after much chaffering I got our stones at 1000 pounds apiece. Then I looked in upon your son, told him that all was right, and eventually got to my bed about two o'clock, after what I may call a really hard day's work."

"A day which has saved England from a great public scandal," said the banker, rising. "Sir, I cannot find words to thank you, but you shall not find me ungrateful for what you have done. Your skill has indeed exceeded all that I have heard of it. And now I must fly to my dear boy to apologise to him for the wrong which I have done him. As to what you tell me of poor Mary, it goes to my very heart. Not even your skill can inform me where she is now."

"I think that we may safely say," returned Holmes, "that she is wherever Sir George Burnwell is. It is equally certain, too, that whatever her sins are, they will soon receive a more than sufficient punishment."



 

Das Abenteuer mit dem Diadem aus Beryll
Von Arthur Conan Doyle      

"Holmes", sagte ich, als ich eines Morgens in unserem Erkerfenster stand und die Straße hinunterschaute, "da kommt ein Verrückter. Es scheint nicht gut, dass ihm seine Verwandten erlauben, alleine auf die Straßen zu gehen."

Mein Freund erhob sich gemächlich aus seinem Sessel und schaute mir, die Hände in den Taschen seines Morgenmantels, über die Schulter. Es war ein strahlender, makelloser Februarmorgen und der Schnee vom Vortag lag noch prächtig schimmernd in der Wintersonne auf dem  Boden. Mehr in der Mitte der Baker Street war er durch den Verkehr zu einem braunen, krümeligen Band gepflügt worden, doch an beiden aufgetürmten Rändern der Gehwege lag er noch lag er noch so weiß, wie er gefallen war. Der graue Boden war gereinigt und geräumt worden, war aber immer noch gefährlich rutschig, so dass weniger Fußgänger als sonst dort unterwegs waren. Tatsächlich kam aus der Richtung der Metropolitan Station niemand, außer dem Gentlemant, dessen exzentrisches Verhalten meine Neugierde erweckt hatte.

Er war ein Mann von ungefähr fünfzig, groß, korpulent und beeindruckend, mit einem massiven, markanten Gesicht und einer gebieterischen Art. Er war dunkel, aber teuer gekleidet, mit einem schwarzen Gehrock, einem leuchtenden Hut, braunen Gamaschen und einer perlgrauen, gutgeschnittenen Hose. Sein Verhalten jedoch kontrastierte auf eine absurde Art und Weise mit seiner würdevollen Kleidung und seinem Aussehen, denn er bewegte sich hastig, machte von Zeit zu Zeit kleine Sprünge, wie ein müder Mann das tut, der nicht gewohnt war, seinen Beinen etwas abzuverlangen. Während er rannte, zuckte er mit den Armen auf und ab, wackelte mit dem Kopf und verzerrte sein Gesicht zu allen möglichen Grimassen.

"Was um alles in der Welt mag ihm zugestoßen sein?", fragte ich. "Er schaut auf die Hausnummern."

"Ich denke er kommt hierher", sagte Holmes und rieb sich die Hände.

"Hierher?"

"Ja. Ich denke er kommt, um nich wegen beruflichen Dingen um Rat zu fragen. Ich denke ich habe die Symptome wiedererkannt. Ha! Hab ich es Ihnen nicht gesagt?" Noch während er sprach, eilte der Mann prustend und schnaubend zu unserer Tür, zog die Klingelschnur bis das ganze Haus von dem Scheppern hallte.

Wenige Augenblicke später war er, noch immer schnaubend, noch immer herumfuchtelnd, in unserem Zimmer. In seinem Blick lag jedoch soviel Pein und Verzweiflung, dass unsere Lächeln schlagartig in Entsetzen und Mitleid umschlug. Eine Zeitlang brachte er kein Wort hervor, sondern schaukelte mit seinem Körper und raufte sich, wie jemand, der Nahe daran ist, den Verstand zu verlieren, die Haare. Dann sprang er plötzlich auf die Füße und schlug mit dem Kopf so heftig gegen die Wand, dass wir uns beide auf ihn stürtzten und ihn in die Mitte des Zimmers zurückzogen. Sherlock Holmes drückte ihn in den Sessel, setzte sich neben ihn, tätschelte seine Hand und redete, was er gut konnte, sanft und beruhigend auf ihn ein.

"Sie sind hierher gekommen, um ihr Geschichte zu erzählen, ist es nicht so?", sagte er. "Ihre Eile hat sie erschöpft. Ich bitte Sie, sich auszuruhen, bis Sie sich erholt haben und dann werde ich mich glücklich schätzen, mich um das kleine Problem, das Sie mir darlegen werden, zu kümmern."

Der Mann saß eine Minute oder mehr mit keuchender Brust da und kämpfte mit seinen Gefühlen. Dann fuhr er sich mit einem Taschentuch über seine Augenbrauen, spitzte die Lippen und wandte uns sein Gesicht zu.

"Kein Zweifel. Halten Sie mich für verrückt?", sagte er.

"Ich sehe, dass sie ein großes Problem hatten", antwortete Holmes.

"Gott weiß, dass ich das habe! Schwierigkeiten, die mich fast um den Verstand bringen, so unvermutet und schrecklich sind sie. Obwohl ich jemand mit makelosem Ruf bin, droht mir jetzt öffentliche Schande. Private Schicksalschläge sind das Los eines jeden, bei mir jedoch sind beide zusammen gekommen, dazu noch in so einer furchtbaren Art. Das war zuviel für mein Gemüt. Auch geht es nicht nur um mich. Der Edelste des Landes wird ebenfalls leiden, wenn nicht ein Weg aus der schrecklichen Angelegenheit gefunden wird."

"Bitte beruhigen Sie sich", sagte Holmes, "und schildern Sie mir ausführlich, wer Sie sind und was Ihnen zugestoßen ist."

"Mein Name ist Ihnen ", antwortete unser Besucher, " vermutlich bereits zu Ohren gekommen.Ich bin Alexander Holder von der Holder & Stevenson Bank in der Threadneedle Street."
 
Der Name war uns tatsächlich wohlbekannt, da er zum Seniorpartner des zweitgrößten Bankenkonzerns in der City von London gehörte. Was konnte also vorgefallen sein, um einen der herausragendsten Bürger Londons in eine solch bemitleidenswerte Situation zu bringen? Wir warteten gespannt, bis er sich zusammenriss und uns die Geschichte erzählte.

"Ich spüre, dass nur noch wenig Zeit bleibt", sagte er. "Deshalb bin ich hierher geeilt, als der Polizeiinspektor riet, mich ihrer Mithilfe zu versichern. Ich bin mit der Metro zur Baker Street gefahren und von dort zu Fuß weitergegangen, denn die Kutschen kommen bei diesem Schnee nur langsam voran. Deshalb war ich so außer Atem, denn ich bin ein Mann, der sich selten bewegt. Jetzt fühle ich mich besser und werde Ihnen so kurz und knapp wie ich kann, die Fakten erzählen.

Es ist Ihnen sicher bekannt, dass der Erfolg einer Bank sowohl davon abhängt, ob es gelingt attraktive Investitionen für die Einlagen zu finden, wie auch davon, ob wir unsere Geschäftbeziehungen erweitern und die Anzahl der Anleger erhöhen können. Eine unserer interessantesten Geldanlagen ist in Form von Darlehen, deren Sicherheit untadelig ist. Wir haben in den letzten Jahren auf diesem Feld große Fortschritte gemacht und vielen wohlhabenden Familien große Summen an Geld ausgeliehen, die durch ihre Bilder, Büchereien oder Silber gesichert waren.

Gestern Morgen saß ich in meinem Büro, als einer der Büroangestellten mir einen Brief hereinreichte. Ich fuhr auf, als ich den Namen sah, denn es war kein anderer....Ihnen gegenüber reicht es, wenn ich sage, dass es ein Name war, der in allen Familien dieser Welt alltäglich ist, einer der höchsten, edelsten und überragendsten Namen in England. Ich war überwältigt von dieser Ehre und versuchte, als er hereinkam, dies zu sagen, doch er ging sofort, wie ein Mann, der eine unangenehme Aufgabe schnell hinter sich bringen will, zum Geschäftlichen über.

„Mr. Holder', sagte er, 'man sagte mir, dass sie Geld leihen.“

„Das Unternehmen tut dies, wenn ausreichend Sicherheiten vorhanden sind“, antwortete ich.

„Es ist von höchster Wichtigkeit für mich“, sagte er, „dass ich sofort 50 000 Pfund erhalte. Ich könnte eine so geringe Summe natürlich auch von meinen Freunden ausleihen, doch ich ziehe es vor, ein normales Geschäft daraus zu machen und es selbst abzuwickeln. Sie verstehen, dass es in meiner Position nicht klug ist, sich irgend jemandem gegenüber verpflichtet zu fühlen.“

„Darf ich fragen, für wie lange Sie dieses Geld haben wollen?“, fragte ich.

„Am kommenden Montag schuldet mir jemand eine große Summe und dann denke ich zurückzuzahlen, was Sie mir leihen und alle hierauf entfallenen Zinsen, die sie erheben. Es ist jedoch entscheidend für mich, dass das Geld sofort ausgezahlt wird.“

„Ich wäre glücklich, es ohne weiteres aus meinem Privatvermögen vorzustrecken“, antwortete ich, „wenn die Summe meine Möglichkeiten nicht überstiege. Wenn ich es aber im Namen der Firma machen soll, dann muss ich, aus Rücksicht auf meinen Partner, darauf beharren, auch in Ihrem Fall, dass die geschäftsüblichen Vorsichtsmaßnahmen eingehalten werden.“

„Ich wünsche doch sehr, dass es so gemacht wird“, sagte er und hielt eine quadratische, schwarze mit feinem Ziegenleger bezogene Schachtel in die Höhe, die er neben sich auf den Stuhl legte. „Sie haben sicherlich von dem Beryll Diadem gehört?“ (Beryll: Gruppe von Silicat Mineralien, darunter auch Smaragd, Aquamarin.

„Genau.“ Er öffnete die Schachtel und darin lag, eingebettet in fleischfarbenen Samt, das herrliche Schmuckstück, welches er genannt hatte. „Es befinden sich neununddreißig riesige Berylls darauf“, sagte er, „und der Preis der Goldfassung ist unermesslich. Die vorsichtigste Schätzung würde auf einen Wert kommen, die dem Doppelten dessen entspricht, was ich brauche. Ich bin bereit, es Ihnen als Sicherheit zu überlassen.“

Ich nahm die kostbare Schachtel in meine Hand und mein Blick wanderte von dem Kästchen zu meinem illustren Gast.

„Sie zweifeln an seinem Wert?“, fragte er.

"Absolut nicht. Ich zweifle nur....“

"Ob es angemessen ist. Sie können beruhigt sein. Ich würde nicht mal davon träumen, das zu tun, wenn ich nicht absolut sicher wäre, dass ich es in vier Tagen wieder zurückfordern kann. Es handelt sich um eine reine Formalität. Reicht das als Sicherheit aus?"

"Bei weitem."

"Sie verstehen Mr. Holders, dass ich Ihnen sehr viel Vertrauen entgegen bringe. Dieses ist begründet in dem, was ich über Sie gehört habe. Ich verlasse mich nicht nur darauf, dass Sie die Angelegenheit diskret behandeln, sondern auch darauf, dass Sie sich aus allem Tratsch über die Angelegenheit heraushalten. Vor allem aber, dass Sie das Diadem mit äußerster Vorsicht hüten. Es ist wohl nicht nötig, zu sagen, dass es ein großer öffentlicher Skandal wäre, wenn ihm ein Schaden zugefügt würde. Jeder Schaden wäre fast so schlimm, wie ein kompletter Verlust, denn es gibt keine Berylls auf der ganzen Welt, die diesen gleichen. Es wäre also unmöglich, sie zu ersetzen. Ich übergebe es Ihnen, setze jedoch mein ganzes Vertrauen in Sie und werde es persönlich am Montag Morgen abholen."

"Da ich sah, dass es meinen Kunden drängte, zu gehen, sagte ich nichts mehr, rief meinen Kassierer und veranlasste ihn, fünfzig 1000 Pfund Noten auszuzahlen. Als ich aber wieder alleine war und die wertvolle Schachtel vor mir auf dem Tisch lag, drehten sich all meine Gedanken mit einem unguten Gefühl um die enorme Verantwortung, welche sie mir aufbürdete. Es bestand kein Zweifel darüber, dass es sich um etwas von nationaler Bedeutung handelte, dass es ein schrecklicher Skandal wäre, wenn ihm irgendein Unglück zustoßen würde. Ich bedauerte bereits, dass ich mich bereit erklärt hatte, die Verantwortung dafür zu übernehmen. Nun war es jedoch zu spät, um noch etwas daran zu ändern. Ich schloss es also in meinen Privatsafe ein und kehrte wieder zu meiner Arbeit zurück.

Als es Abend wurde, dachte ich, dass es unklug wäre, etwas so Wertvolles im Büro zurückzulassen. Schon der Banktresor war einmal aufgebrochen worden, warum sollte das nicht auch mit meinem Privatsafe passieren? Wenn das passieren würde, in welch entsetzlicher Position befände ich mich dann! Ich beschloss also, die Schachtel in den nächsten Tagen immer mit mir hin- und herzutragen, so dass sie nie außer Reichweite sein würde. Mit dieser Absicht rief ich eine Kutsche und fuhr, das Schmuckstück mit mir führend, zu mir nach Hause nach Streatham. Ich konnte nicht frei atmen, bevor ich es nicht ins obere Stockwerk gebracht und in der Kommode in meinem Anziehraum eingeschlossen hatte.

Lassen Sie mich noch ein paar Worte zu meinem Haushalt sagen, Mr. Holmes, denn ich wünsche, dass Sie die Situation vollkommen erfassen. Mein Strallbursche und mein Page schlafen außerhalb des Hauses, sie kommen ganz und gar nicht in Betracht. Ich habe drei Hausmädchen, die schon viele Jahre bei mir sind und deren absolute Zuverlässigkeit außer Frage steht. Eine andere, Lucy Parr, die zweite Kammerjungfer, ist erst seit ein paar Monaten in meinen Diensten. Sie hat jedoch einen exzellenten Charakter und ich war immer mit ihr zufrieden. Sie ist ein sehr schönes Mädchen und hat unter den Besuchern, die sich zufällig dort einfanden, Bewunderer gefunden. Das ist der einzige Mangel, den wir an ihr haben finden können, doch wir glauben, dass sie durch und durch und in jeder Hinsicht ein gutes Mädchen ist.

Soviel zu den Bediensteten. Mein Familie selbst ist nicht sehr groß, so dass ich nicht allzu lange brauchen werde, um sie zu beschreiben. Ich bin Witwer und habe nur einen Sohn, Arthur. Er war eine Entäuschung für mich, Mr.Holmes, eine ernste Enttäuschung. Ich habe keinen Zweifel daran, dass ich selbst Schuld daran trage. Man sagt mir, ich habe ihn verzogen. Wahrscheinlich habe ich das. Als meine geliebte Frau starb, war er der Einzige, den ich liebte. Ich konnte es nicht ertragen, wenn das Lächeln auch nur einen Moment aus seinem Gesicht schwand. Ich habe ihm nie einen Wunsch abgeschlagen. Vielleicht wäre es besser für uns beide gewesen, wenn ich unnachgiebiger gewesen wäre, doch ich habe es nur gut gemeint.
 
Es war natürlich mein Wunsch, dass er in mein Unternehmen eintritt, doch er erwies sich für geschäftliche Dinge als ungeeignet. Er war wild, eigenwillig und, um die Wahrheit zu sagen, ich konnte ihm keine großen Summen Geld anvertrauen. Als er jung war, wurde er Mitglied eines aristokratischen Clubs und schloss dort, aufgrund seines einnehmenden Wesens, Freundschaft mit ein paar Männern der Aristokratie, die große Geldbörsen und einen aufwendigen Lebensstil hatten. Er gewöhnte sich an, extensiv Karten zu spielen und sein Geld sinnlos zu verprassen, so dass er mich immer wieder um einen Vorschuss bitten musste, um seine Ehrenschulden zu bezahlen. Er versuchte mehr als einmal, sich von der gefährlichen Gesellschaft, mit der er Umgang hatte, zu lösen, doch jedesmal war der Einfluss seines Freundes George Burnwell groß genug, um ihn davon abzuhalten.

Tatsächlich konnte es mich auch nicht verwundern, dass ein Mann wie Sir George Burnwell Einfluss auf ihn bekam, denn er hatte ihn oft nach Hause mitgebracht und ich musste feststellen, dass ich seiner faszinierenden Art nicht widerstehen konnte. Er ist älter als Arthur, ein Mann von Welt bis in die Fingerspitzen. Jemand der überall gewesen ist, alles gesehen hat, ein brillianter Redner und sehr gut aussehend. Doch denke ich nüchtern über ihn nach, ohne seine Anziehungskraft vor Augen zu haben, dann bin ich, denke ich an seine zynischen Bemerkungen und den Blick, den ich in seinen Augen gesehen habe, dass es jemand ist, dem man misstrauen sollte. Das ist, was ich, wie auch meine kleine Mary, die ihn mit ihrer weiblichen Intuition schnell durchschaute, über ihn denke.  

Nun muss man nur noch sie beschreiben. Sie ist meine Nichte. Doch als mein Bruder vor fünf Jahren starb und sie alleine auf der Welt zurückließ, adoptierte ich sie und habe mich um sie wie um eine Tochter gekümmert. Sie ist der Sonnenschein meines Hauses, anmutig, liebevoll, schön, eine wunderbarere Verwalterin und Haushälterin, so zärtlich, ruhig und nett wie eine Frau nur sein kann. Sie ist meine rechte Hand. Ich wüsste nicht, was ich ohne sie täte. Nur in einer Sache, handelte sie nicht, wie ich es mir gewünscht hätte. Zweimal schon bat sie mein Sohn, sie zu heiraten, denn er liebt sie innig, doch jedesmal hat sie ihn zurückgewiesen. Ich denke, dass wenn irgendjemand ihn auf den rechten Weg zurückbringen kann, dann ist sie es und eine Heirat mit ihr würde sein ganzes Leben verändern. Doch nun, ist es zu spät, für immer zu spät!

Sie kennen nun die Leute, die unter meinem Dach leben und ich werde mit meiner schrecklichen Geschichte fortfahren.

Als wir an diesem Abend im Salon Kaffee tranken, erzählte ich Arthur und Mary, was ich erlebt hatte und von dem Schmuckstück, dass sich unter unserem Dach befand, verschwieg dabei nur den Namen unseres Kunden. Lucy Parr, die den Kaffee brachte, hatte, dessen bin ich mir sicher, den Raum bereits verlassen, obwohl ich nicht schwören könnte, dass die Tür geschlossen war. Mary und Arthur waren sehr interessiert und wünschten das berühmte Diadem zu sehen, doch ich glaubte, es sei besser, es nicht zu stören.“

"Wo verwahrst du es?", fragte Arthur.

"In meinem Büro."

"Dann hoffe ich, dass heute Nacht nicht eingebrochen wird", sagte er.

"Es ist verschlossen", antwortete ich.

"Oh, jeder alte Schlüssel passt für die Kommode. Als ich ein Junge war, habe ich sie mit dem Schlüssel der Abstellkammer geöffnet."

"Er redete öfters unbeherrscht vor sich hin, so dass ich dem, was er sagte, nur wenig Beachtung schenkte. Diese Nacht jedoch folgte er mir mit ernster Miene in mein Zimmer.“

"Hör mal Vater", sagte er mit gesenktem Blick, "kannst du mir 200 Pfund leihen?"

"Nein, kann ich nicht!", antwortete ich scharf. "Ich bin, was das Geld angeht, zu großzügig mit dir gewesen."

"Du warst sehr freundlich", sagte er, "doch ich brauche dieses Geld, andernfalls kann ich mein Gesicht im Club nicht mehr zeigen."

"Gut so!", schrie ich.

"Ja, aber du willst doch sicher nicht, dass ich ihn als entehrter Mann verlasse", sagte er. "Ich könnte die Schande nicht ertragen. Ich muss das Geld irgendwie aufbringen und wenn du es mir nicht leihst, dann muss ich andere Mittel finden."

Ich war sehr verärgert, denn es war die dritte Frage in diesem Monat. "Du wirst nicht einen Heller von mir bekommen", schrie ich. Daraufhin verneigte er sich und verließ den Raum ohne ein weiteres Wort.

Als er aus dem Raum gegangen war, schloss ich die Kommode auf, überprüfte, ob mein Schatz sicher war und schloss sie wieder. Dann ging ich um das Haus herum und überprüfte, ob alles sicher war. Eine Aufgabe, die ich gewöhnlich Mary überließ, die ich aber diese Nacht selber erledigen wollte. Als ich die Stufen herunterkam, sah ich Mary am pagina nfenster der Halle, welches sie, als ich näherkam schloss und zumachte.

"Vater, hast du Lucy, dem Hausmädchen", sagte sie, wobei ihr Blick verriet, so schien es mir, dass ich sie bei etwas gestört hätte, "heute Freigang gegeben?"

"Sicherlich nicht."

"Sie kam gerade durch die Hintertür. Ich bin mir völlig sicher, dass sie an der pagina ntür war, um irgendjemanden zu sehen, doch ich denke kaum, dass das sicher ist. Man sollte ihr Einhalt gebieten."

"Du musst morgen mit ihr sprechen oder ich, wenn du das willst. Bist du sicher, dass alles geschlossen ist?"

"Absolut sicher, Vater."

"Dann gute Nacht." Ich küsste sie und ging wieder in mein Schlafzimmer, wo ich dann alsbald einschlief.

„Ich bemühe mich, Ihnen alles zu erzählen, Mr. Holmes, was für den Fall irgendwie von Bedeutung sein könnte, bitte Sie jedoch, dass Sie nachfragen, wenn ich bei irgendwas nicht deutlich war."

"Ganz im Gegenteil, Ihre Aussagen sind bemerkenswert klar."

"Ich komme nun zu dem parte meiner Geschichte, wo ich besonders wünsche, dies zu sein. Ich habe keinen tiefen Schlaf und die Sorge, die meinen Geist beschäftigte, sorgte dafür, dass er es noch weniger war als sonst. Etwa um zwei Uhr morgens wurde ich durch ein Geräusch im Haus geweckt. Bevor ich ganz erwachte, hatte es aufgehört, jedoch den Eindruck hinterlassen, als ob ein Fenster irgendwo vorsichtig geschlossen worden wäre. Ich blieb mit gespitzten Ohren liegen. Plötzlich waren zu meinem Entsetzen sehr klar Schritte vernehmbar, die sich langasm auf den anliegenden Raum zubewegten. Ich schlüpfte, vor Angst zitternd, aus dem Bett und äugte um die Ecke der Tür meines Ankleideraumes.

"Arthur", schrie ich, "Schurke! Dieb! Wie kannst du es wagen, dich an dem Diadem zu vergreifen?"

Die Gaslampe war halb aufgedreht, so wie es war, als ich den Raum verlassen hatte und mein unglücklicher Junge, nur mit einem Hemd und einer Hose bekleidet, stand neben dem Licht und hielt das Diadem in Händen. Es schien, als würde er daran reissen oder es mit aller Kraft festhalten zu wollen. Als er meinen Schrei hörte, ließ er locker und wurde blass wie der Tod. Ich schnappte es und untersuchte es. Eine der goldenen Kronen mit mit drei Berylls fehlte.

"Du Schuft", rief ich außer mir vor Wut. "Du hast es zerstört! Du hast mich für immer entehrt! Wo sind die Juwelen, die du gestohlen hast?"

"Gestohlen!", schrie er.

"Ja! Dieb!", brüllte ich und schüttelte ihn an den Schultern.

"Kein einziger fehlt. Es kann nicht sein, dass einer fehlrt", sagte er.

"Es fehlen drei. Und du weißt, wo sie sind. Muss ich dich nicht nur einen Dieb, sondern auch einen Lügner nennen? Hab ich nicht gesehen, dass du versucht hast, auch noch ein anderes Stück rauszureissen?"

"Du hast mich nun mit genug Schimpfwörtern betitelt", sagte er, "ich werde das nicht mehr dulden. Ich sage nichts mehr über die Angelegenheit, da du beschlossen hast, mich zu beschimpfen. Ich verlasse dieses Haus noch heute Morgen und mache meinen Weg."

"Du wirst es verlassen und bei der Polizei landen". Ich schrie halbverrückt vor Schmerz und Wut. "Ich werde der Sache auf den Grund gehen."

"Du werden nichts von mir erfahren", sagte er mit einer Leidenschaft, von der ich nicht geglaubt hätte, dass er dazu fähig wäre.

Zu diesem Zeitpunkt war das ganze Haus wach, denn vor lauter Wut hatte ich geschrien. Mary war die Erste, die in den Raum eilte und fiel, beim Anblick des Diadems und Arthurs Gesicht, woraus sie sich alles zusammenreimen konnte, bewusstlos zu Boden. Ich schickte das Hausmädchen zur Polizei und überließ ihr sofort die Ermittlungen. Als der Inspektor und der Wachtmeister das Haus betraten, fragte mich Arthur, der mürrisch und mit verschränkten Armen dastand, ob es meine Absicht sei, ihn des Diebstahls anzuklagen. Ich antwortete ihm, dass es nun keine Privatangelegenheit mehr sei, sondern eine öffentliche, denn das beschädigte Diadem sei öffentlicher Besitz. Ich war entschlossen, das Gesetz in allen Belangen walten zu lassen.“

"Zumindest", sagte er, "wirst du mich nicht gleich verhaften lassen. Es wäre zu deinem wie zu meinem Vorteil, wenn ich das Haus für fünf Minuten verließe."

"Damit du flüchten oder damit du das, was du gestohlen hast verstecken kannst", sagte ich. Dann bat ich ihn, als mir die schreckliche Lage, in der ich mich befand, bewusst wurde, sich daran zu erinnern, dass nicht nur meine Ehre, sondern auch die von jemand, der viel grandezzar war als ich, auf dem Spiel stand, und dass er einen Skandal heraufbeschwor, der die Nation erschüttern wird. Er könnte all das verhindern, wenn er mir sagen würde, was er mit den drei fehlenden Steinen gemacht hatte.

"Du kannst ruhig alles zugeben", sagte ich. "Du bist in flagranti erwischt worden und ein Eingeständnis kann deine Schuld nicht grässlicher machen. Wenn du aber zumindest das, was du wieder gutmachen kannst, wieder gut machst, indem du uns sagst, wo die Berylle sind, dann wird alles vergeben und vergessen und sein."

"Bewahr deine Vergebung für die auf, die danach fragen", antwortete er und wandte sich mit einem spöttischen Grinsen von mir ab. Ich sah, dass er zu stur war, um in irgendeiner Weise durch mein Zureden beeinflusst werden zu können. Es gab nur einen Weg. Ich rief den Inspektor und ließ ihn festnehmen. Sofort wurde alles durchsucht, nicht nur seine Person, sondern auch sein Zimmer und jede Ecke des Hauses, wo er die Juwelen versteckt haben könnte, doch weder wurde eine Spur von ihnen gefunden, noch öffnete der starrköpfige Junge, egal wie wir ihm zuredeten oder drohten, seinen Mund. Heute Morgen wurde er in eine Zelle gebracht und ich bin, nachdem ich alle Formalitäten bei der Polizei erledigt hatte, zu Ihnen geeilt, um Sie zu bitten, Ihre Fähigkeiten einzusetzen, um die Angelegenheit zu klären. Die Polize hat mir offen gestanden, dass sie gegenwärtig nichts tun können. Sie können soviel verlangen, wie sie wollen. Ich habe schon eine Belohnung von 1000 Pfund ausgesetzt. Gott weiß, was ich alles tun würde! Ich habe in einer Nacht meine Ehre verloren, meine Juwelen und meinen Sohn. Was soll ich tun!"

Er nahm seinen Kopf zwischen seine beiden Hände und schaukelte hin und her, brummte wie ein Kind, das für sein Leid keine Worte findet.

Sherlock Holmes saß einige Minuten schweigend das, mit gerunzelten Augenbrauen und die Augen starr auf das Feuer gerichtet.

"Haben Sie viel Besuch?", fragte er.

"Außer meinem Partner und seiner Familie und zufällige Freunde von Arthur niemanden. Sir George Burnwell war in letzter Zeit mehrere Male da. Niemand sonst, denke ich."

"Gehen Sie oft aus?"

"Arthur tut das. Mary und ich bleiben zu Hause. Keiner von uns macht sich viel daraus."

"Das ist ungewöhnlich, für ein junges Mädchen."

"Sie ist von Natur aus sehr ruhig. Abgesehen davon ist sie nicht so jung. Sie ist vierundzwanzig."

"Folgt man Ihren Aussagen, war die ganze Angelegenheit auch ein Schock für sie."

"Schrecklich! Sie ist noch betrübter, als ich es bin."

"Keiner von Ihnen hegt irgendeinen Zweifel an der Schuld Ihres Sohnes?"

"Wie könnten wir das, wo ich ihn doch mit eigenen Augen gesehen habe, wie er das Diadem hielt."

"Das kann ich kaum als eindeutigen Beweis anerkennen. War das, was von dem Diadem übrig blieb, beschädigt?"

"Ja, es war verbogen."

"Glauben Sie nicht, dass er versucht haben könnte, es wieder gerade zu biegen?"

"Gott segne Sie! Sie tun, was Sie für ihn und mich tun können, doch es ist eine schwere Aufgabe. Was hatte er dort verloren? Wenn seine Absichten lauter waren, warum sagte er es dann nicht?"

"Genau. Und wenn er schuldig ist, warum hat er sich dann keine Lüge ausgedacht? Sein Schweigen scheint mir so oder so keinen Sinn zu ergeben. Es gibt einige merkwürdige Aspekte in dieser Angelegenheit. Was denkt die Polizei bezüglich des Lärms, der Sie geweckt hat?"

"Sie denken, dass er entstanden ist, als Arthur die Schlafzimmertür schloss."

"Eine sehr wahrscheinliche Annahme! Ganz so, als ob ein Mann, der vorhat, ein Verbrechen zu begehen, die Tür zuknallt, damit das ganze Haus wach wird. Was sagen Sie bezüglich des Verschwindens der Juwelen?"

"Sie untersuchen immer noch die Planken und durchsuchen die Möbel in der Hoffnung, sie zu finden."

"Haben Sie daran gedacht außerhalb des Hauses zu suchen?"

"Ja, sie haben eine ungewöhnlich Tatkraft an den Tag gelegt. Der ganze Garten ist bereit minutiös untersucht worden."

"Nun mein Herr", sagte Holmes, "ist es nicht offensichtlich für Sie, dass die Sache sehr viel tiefer reicht, als Sie oder die Polizei anfänglich geneigt waren zu glauben? Ihnen erschien es als ein klarer Fall, mir erscheint es sehr kompliziert. Bedenken Sie einmal, was Ihre Theorie für Implikationen hat. Sie nehmen an, dass Ihr Sohn sein Bett verlassen hat, dann, ein großes Risiko in Kauf nehmend, zu Ihrem Ankleidezimmer gegangen ist, Ihre Kommode geöffnet hat, dann mit großer Kraft einen kleinen parte davon herausgebrochen hat, dann irgendwoanders hingegangen ist, die drei Juwelen von den neununddreißig versteckt hat, und zwar so geschickt, dass niemand sie finden kann, dass er dann mit den anderen sechunddreißig in den Raum zurückgekommen ist, wo er sich selbst dem großen Risiko aussetzte, entdeckt zu werden. Ich frage Sie nun, ist das eine stimmige Theorie?"

"Doch welche andere kann es geben?", rief der Banker mit einer Geste, die seine Verzweiflung ausdrückte. "Wenn seine Motive lauter sind, warum erklärt er sie dann nicht?"

"Es ist unsere Ausgabe, das herauszufinden", antwortete Holmes. "Wenn Sie also die Güte haben, Mr. Holder, dann machen wir uns jetzt gemeinsam auf den Weg nach Streatham und beschäftigen uns eine Stunde damit, uns die Details ein bisschen näher anzuschauen."

Mein Freund beharrte darauf, dass ich sie auf ihrem Ausflug begleite, was ich sehr gerne tat, denn meine Neugierde und mein Interesse waren durch die Geschichte, die wir gehört hatten, geweckt. Ich bekenne, dass es für mich so klar wie für seinen Vater war, dass der Sohn schuldig ist. Doch mein Vertrauen in Holmes Urteilskraft war so groß, dass ich glaubte, dass, solange wie er mit der gegebenen Erklärungn nicht zufrieden war, noch Hoffnung bestand. Er sprach auf dem Weg zu dem südlichen Stadtteil kaum ein Wort. Er saß nur da, mit dem Kinn auf der Brust und mit dem Hut über die Augen gezogen, in tiefe Gedanken versunken. Unser Kunde schien durch den Funken Hoffnung, der sich ihm gezeigt hatte, wieder Mut gefasst zu haben und er begann mit mir sogar ein belangloses Gespräch über seine geschäftlichen Aktivitäten. Eine kurze Fahrt mit der Eisenbahn und ein noch kürzerer Fußmarsch brachte uns zu der bescheidenen Residenz des großen Financiers.  

Fairbank war ein recht großes, quadratischen Haus aus weißem Stein, nicht weit von der Straße gelegen. Eine zweispurige Zufahrt, mit einer schneebedeckten Rasenfläche, führte zu zwei großen Eisentoren, die den Zugang versperrten. Rechts war ein kleines, holziges Dickicht, das zu einem schmalen Pfad führte, dem Lieferanteneingang, der von zwei gestutzten Hecken umfasst war und die Straße mit der Küchentür verband. Links war ein Weg, der zu den Ställen führte. Dieser gehörte nicht mehr zum Anwesen, denn er war ein öffentlich zugänglicher, wenn auch selten benutzter, Durchgangsweg. Holmes verließ uns an der Tür und ging langsam um das Haus herum, an der Frontseite vorbei, durch den Garten, zu der Stallzufahrt. Er blieb so lange aus, dass Mr. Holder und ich ins Esszimmer gingen und am Feuer warteten, bis er zurückkäme. Wir saßen schweigend da, als sich die Tür öffnete und eine junge Frau hereinkam. Sie ein bisschen grandezzar als der Durchscnitt, mit schwarzem Haar und Augen, die noch dunkler erschienen, weil sie sich von der völligen Bläse der Haut absetzten. Ich glaube nicht, dass ich jemals eine solche Totenblässe bei einer Frau gesehen habe. Auch ihre Lippen waren blutleer. Ihre Augen verweint. Als sie leise in den Raum glitt, berührte mich ihr Leiden mehr als das den Bankers am Morgen. Da sie offensichtlich eine Frau mit starkem Charakter war, mit einer großen Selbstbeherrschung, berührte ihr Schmerz umso mehr. Ohne auf mich zu achten, ging sie direkt zu ihrem Onkel und strich ihm, mit einer sanften, weiblichen Zärtlichkeit über den Kopf.

"Du hast veranlasst, dass Arthur freigelassen wird. Hast du das, Vater?", fragte sie.

"Nein, nein mein Mädchen, die Angelegenheit muss vollkommen aufgeklärt werden."

"Ich bin mir jedoch so sicher, dass er unschuldig ist. Du weißt, was weibliche Intuitiion ist. Ich weiß, dass er nichts Böses getan hat, und dass du bereuen wirst, ihn so schlecht behandelt zu haben."

"Warum schweigt er, wenn er unschuldig ist?"

"Wer weiß? Vielleicht, weil er so verärgert darüber ist, das du ihn verdächtigst."

"Wie kann ich ihn nicht verdächtigen, wenn ich ihn doch mit dem Diadem in seiner Hand gesehen habe?"

"Aber er hat es nur herausgenommen, um es sich anzuschauen. So glaub mir doch, dass er unschuldig ist. Lass die Angelegenheit auf sich beruhen und sprich nicht mehr darüber. Es ist so schrecklich, daran zu denken, dass unser lieber Arthur im Gefängnis sitzt."

"Ich were die Angelegenheit solange nicht auf sich beruhen lassen, bis die Juwelen gefunden werden, nie, Mary! Deine Zuneigung für Arthur macht dich blind für die Konsequenzen, die sich daraus ergeben. Weit davon entfernt, die Dinge zu verschweigen, habe ich einen Gentleman von London geholt, der sie noch eingehender untersuchen wird."

"Diesen Gentleman?", fragte sie und richtete ihren Blick auf mich.

"Nein, seinen Freund. Er wünschte, dass wir ihn alleine ließen. Er ist jetzt auf der Zufahrt zu den Ställen."

"Der Zufahrt zu den Ställen?" Sie zog ihre schwarzen Augenbrauen nach oben. "Was hofft er dort zu finden? Ah! Ich vermute, der da ist es. Ich hoffe Sir, dass es Ihnen gelingen wird, das zu beweisen, dessen ich mir sicher bin, nämlich dass mein Cousin Arthur mit dem Verbrechen nichts zu tun hat."

"Ich teile Ihre Meinung vollkommen und ich vertraue wie Sie darauf, dass wir das auch werden beweisen können", erwiderte Holmes und ging zurück zur Fußmatte, um sich den Schnee von den Schuhen abzuklopfen. "Ich denke, ich habe die Ehre, mit Frau Mary Holder zu sprechen. Kann ich Sie ein zwei Dinge fragen?"

"Ich bitte Sie darum Sir. Wenn es dazu dient, diese schreckliche Angelegenheit aufzuklären."

"Haben Sie selbst letzte Nacht nichts gehört?"

"Nichts, bis mein Onkel zu schreien begann. Als ich es hörte, kam ich herunter."

"Sie haben am Abend zuvor die Fenster geschlossen. Haben Sie alle Fenster geschlossen?"

"Ja."

"Waren Sie heute Morgen noch alle geschlossen?"

"Ja."

"Sie haben ein Hausmädchen, das einen Geliebten hat? Mir ist bekannt, dass Sie gegenüber Ihrem Onkel bemerkten, dass sie hinausgegangen ist, um ihn zu sehen?"

"Ja. Sie war es auch, die im Wohnzimmer war und vielleicht die Bemerkung meines Onkels über das Diadem gehört hat."

"Ich sehe. Sie deuten an, dass sie hinausgegangen ist, um ihrem Geliebten alles zu erzählen und die zwei den Diebstahlt planten."

"Was sollen alle diese vagen Theorien", rief der Banker ungeduldig, "wo ich Ihnen doch erzählt habe, dass ich Arthur mit dem Diadem in der Hand gesehen habe?"

"Warten Sie ein bisschen, Mr. Holder. Wir werden darauf zurückkommen. Nochmal zurück zu diesem Mädchen, Miss Holder. Sie sahen, wie sie durch die Küchentür wieder hereinkam, vermute ich?"

"Ja. Als ich nachschaute, ob das Fenster für die Nacht geschlossen ist, sah ich, wie sie hereinschlich. Auch den Mann habe ich in der Dunkelheit erkannt."

"Kennen Sie ihn?"

"Oh ja! Er ist der Gemüsehändler, der uns das Gemüse vorbei bringt. Er heißt Francis Prosper."

"Er stand", sagte Holmes, "links von der Tür, also weiter vom Weg entfernt als nötig wäre, um die Tür zu erreichen?"

"Ja, das tat er."

"Und er hat ein Holzbein?"

Etwas wie Angst leuchtete in den ausdrucksstarken  Augen der jungen Lady auf. "Warum, Sie sind ja fast ein Zauberer", sagte Sie. "Woher wissen Sie das?" Sie lächelte, doch im ernsten Gesicht Holmes war kein Lächeln, welches das ihrige erwiderte.

"Ich wäre nun sehr erfreut, wenn wir uns ins erste Stockwerk begeben könnten", sagte er. "Vielleicht muss ich dann nochmal um das Haus herumgehen. Ich hätte vielleicht besser einen Blick auf die unteren Fenster geworfen, bevor ich nach oben ging."

Er ging eilig von einem zum anderen. Nur an dem großen Fenster, das von der Halle auf die Zufahrt zu den Ställen gerichtet war, hielt er inne. Dieses öffnete er und untersuchte mit seinem mächtigen Vergrandezzarungsglas sorgfältig die Fensterbank. "Nun können wir nach oben gehen", sagte er schlussendlich.

Das Ankleidezimmer des Bankers war ein vollständig möbliertes kleines Zimmer, mit einem grauen Teppich, einer großen Kommode und einem langen Spiegel. Holmes ging zuerst zur Kommode und schaute sich das Schloss genau an.

"Welcher Schlüssel wurde verwendet, um es zu öffnen?", fragte er.

"Der, von dem schon mein Sohn sprach, der vom Schrank der Rumpelkammer.

"Haben Sie ihn hier?"

Sherlock Holmes nahm ihn und öffnete die Kommode.

"Das ist ein geräuschloses Schloss", sagte er. "Es ist kein Wunder, dass Sie nicht aufgewacht sind. In dieser Schachtel befindet sich, vermute ich, das Diadem. Wir müssten es uns mal anschauen." Er öffnete die Schachtel, nahm das Diadem heraus und legte es auf den Tisch. Es war ein wunderbares Beispiel der Goldschmiedekunst und die sechsunddreißig Steine waren die Prächtigsten, die ich jemals gesehen hatte. An einer Ecke war das Diadem beschädigt und drei Juwelen waren herausgebrochen worden.

"Nun Mr. Holder", sagte Holmes, "diese Ecke entspricht der, die unglücklicherweise verloren gegangen ist. Dürfte ich Sie bitten, sie herauszubrechen."

Der Banker sprang entsetzt auf. "Ich sollte nicht mal davon träumen, das zu tun", sagte er.

"Dann mach ich es". Holmes beugte sich mit aller Kraft darüber, doch ohne jedes Ergebnis. "Ich habe den Eindruck, es gibt ein bisschen nach", sagte er, "doch obwohl ich ausgeprochen kräftige Finger habe, bräuchte ich lange, um es aufzubrechen. Ein gewöhnlicher Mann kann das nicht schaffen. Was aber denken Sie, Mr. Holder, was passieren würde, wenn ich es schaffen würde? Es gäbe einen Knall wie ein Pistolenschuss. Glauben Sie wirklich, dass all das nur wenige Yards von ihrem Bett sich ereignet hat und Sie nichts gehört haben?"

"Ich weiß nicht, was ich denken soll. Es ist mir alles sehr rätselhaft."

"Vielleicht wird es klarer, wenn wir weiter voranschreiten. Was denken Sie, Miss Holder?"

"Ich gestehe, dass ich so verwirrt bin wie mein Onkel."

"Ihr Sohn hatte keine Schuhe oder Slipper an, als Sie ihn sahen?"

"Er hatte nichts an, nur eine Hose und ein Hemd."

"Danke. Wir waren bei unserer Untersuchung sicherlich vom Glück begünstigt und es wird allein Ihr Fehler sein, wenn wir es nicht schaffen, die Angelegenheit aufzuklären. Mit Ihrer Erlaubnis, werde ich jetzt meine Untersuchung draußen fortsetzen."

Er ging alleine, so wünschte er es, denn, wie er erklärte, jede weitere Fußspur hätte die Aufgabe erschwert, hinaus. Er arbeitete mehr als eine Stunde und kehrte schließlich mit schneebeladenem Schuhen und so undurchschaubar in seinem Benehmen wie immer, zurück.

"Ich denke, dass wir nun alles gesehen haben, was es zu sehen gibt, Mr. Holder", sagte er. "Ich diene Ihnen am besten, wenn ich nach Hause zurückkehre."

"Doch die Juwelen, Mr. Holms. Wo sind sie?"

"Das kann ich nicht sagen."

Die Hände des Bankers krampften sich zusammen. "Ich werde sie nie mehr wiedersehen", schrie er. "Und mein Sohn? Können Sie mir Hoffnung machen?"

"Meine Meinung hat sich nicht geändert."

"Was war es dann, um Gottes Willen, für ein düsteres Geschäft, das letzte Nacht in meinem Haus abgewickelt wurde?"

"Wenn Sie mich morgen in Baker Street zwischen neun und zehn Uhr besuchen, dann werde ich mich glücken schätzen, alles zu tun, um es zu klären. Ich gehe davon aus, dass Sie mir Vollmacht erteilen, in Ihrem Sinne zu handeln, vorausgesetzt, ich bringe die Juwelen zurück und sie keine Begrenzung auf die Summe setzen, die ich verlangen werde."

"Ich würde mein ganzes Vermögen hingeben, um sie wiederzuerlangen."

"Sehr gut. Ich werde mich umgehend um die Angelegenheit kümmern. Auf Wiedersehen. Gut möglich, dass ich vor dem Abend nochmal hierher zurückkehren muss."

Es war für mich offensichtlich, dass mein Freund sich ein Urteil über die Angelegenheit gebildet hatte, wenn ich auch bezüglich seiner Schlussfolgerungen vollkommen im Dunkeln tappte. Ich versuchte während der Heimfahrt mehrere Male, ihm etwas über die Angelegenheit zu entlocken, doch er wich aus und lenkte das Gespräch auf ein anderes Thema, bis ich schließlich aufgab. Es war kurz vor drei, als wir wieder zu Hause anlangten. Er eilte in sein Zimmer und kam einige Minuten später als ein gewöhnlicher Gammler zurück. Mit seinem hochgeschlagenen Kragen, seinem speckigen, schäbigen Mantel, seinem roten Halstuch, seinen ausgelatschten Stiefeln, war er ein perfektes Exemplar dieser Spezies.

"Ich denke, so geht es", sagte er und schaute in den Spiegel über dem Kamin. "Ich wünschte, Sie könnten mich begleiten, Watson, doch ich glaube, dass dies nicht gut wäre. Vielleicht bin ich auf einer heißen Spur oder vielleicht jage ich einem Irrlicht hinterher. Ich werde es bald wissen. Ich hoffe, ich bin in ein paar Stunden zurück." Er schnitt ein Stück von dem Rinderbraten ab, das sich auf der Anrichte befand, legte es zwischen zwei Scheiben Brot, stopfte dieses einfache Mal in seine Tasche und machte sich auf den Weg.

Ich war gerade mit dem Tee fertig, als er, offensichtlich in bester Laune, seine alten Schuhe mit elastischem Oberteil in der Hand schwenkend, zurückkam. Er warf sie in eine Ecke und servierte sich selber eine Tasse Tee.

"Ich bin nur im Vorübergehen kurz hereingekommen", sagte er. "Ich gehe gleich wieder."

"Wohin?"

"Oh, auf die andere pagina von West End. Es wird wohl eine  Weile dauern, bis ich zurück bin. Warten Sie nicht auf mich, wenn es spät wird."

"Wie geht es voran?"

"Oh, so weit ganz gut. Kann mich nicht beklagen. Ich war in Streatham, seit ich Sie das letzte Mal sah, aber ich habe das Haus nicht betreten. Es ist ein süßes kleines Problem und es wäre sehr schade, wenn ich es verpassen würde. Ich soll hier aber nicht rumsitzen und schwatzen, sondern diese verrufenen Kleider loswerden und zu meinem hoch ehrenwerten Ich zurückkehren."

Ich entnahm seinem Verhalten, dass er ernstere Gründe für seine Zufriedenheit hatte, als seine Worte vermuten ließen. Seine Augen funkelten und seine Wangen waren sogar leicht gerötet. Er rannte die Treppe hinauf und ein paar Minuten später hörte ich, wie die Haustür zugeschlagen wurde, woraus ich entnahm, dass er wieder auf seiner angenehmen Jagd war.

Ich wartete bis Mitternacht, doch noch war nichts von ihm zu sehen. Ich zog mich also in mein Zimmer zurück. Es war nicht ungewöhnlich für ihn, dass er ohne Unterbrechung ein paar Tage und Nächte wegblieg, wenn er auf einer heißen Spur war, so dass mich sein spätes Eintreffen nicht überraschte. Ich weiß nicht, wann er zurückgekommen ist, aber als ich herunterkam, um zu frühstücken, da saß er schon da mit einer Tasse Kaffee in der einen Hand und der Zeitung in der anderen, so ausgeruht und ordentlich wie nur möglich.

"Sie werden entschuldigen, dass ich ohne Sie begonnen habe, Watson", sagte er, "aber Sie erinnern sich, dass unser Kunde heute eine frühe Verabredung hat."

"Es ist jetzt kurz nach neun Uhr", sagte ich. "Ich wäre nicht überrascht, wenn er es wäre. Ich glaubte ein Klingeln zu hören."

Es war tatsächlich unser Freund, der Financier. Ich war erschrocken über die Wandlung, die er durchgemacht hatte.
Sein Gesicht, welches normalerweise breit und massiv war, war nun verhärmt und eingefallen und sein Haar, so schien es mir, war mindestens eine Schattierung weißer. Sein ganzes Erscheinungsbild zeugte von einer Müdigkeit und Erschöpfung, die noch mitleiderregender war, als die Erregtheit des Vortages. Er ließ sich in einen Sessel fallen, welchen ich für ihn zurechtgeschoben hatte.

"Ich weiß nicht, was ich getan habe, um so geprüft zu werden", sagte er. "Noch vor zwei Tagen war ich ein glücklicher und wohlhabender Mann, ohne irgendwelche Sorgen. Jetzt habe ich eine einsame und schändliche Zeit vor mir. Ein Jammer folgt dem anderen auf den Fersen. Meine Nichte, Mary, hat mich verlassen."

"Hat Sie verlassen?"

"Ja. Ihr Bett war heute unberührt, der Raum leer und ein Brief für mich lag auf dem Tisch. Ich hatte ihr letzte Nacht gesagt, vor lauter Kummer und nicht aus Ärger, dass wenn sie meinen Jungen geheiratet hätte, dann wäre mit ihm alles in Ordnung gewesen. Vielleicht war es gedankenlos von mir, so etwas zu sagen. Es ist diese Bemerkung, auf die sich der Brief bezieht.

"Mein lieber Onkel: Ich sehe, dass ich Sie in Schwierigkeiten gebracht habe, und dass dieses Unglück vielleicht nie geschehen wäre, wenn ich anders gehandelt hätte. Mit diesen Gedanken in meinem Kopf, kann ich in ihrem Haus nicht mehr glücklich sein und ich denke, es ist das Beste, wenn ich Sie für immer verlasse. Sorgen Sie sich nicht um meine Zukunft, denn hierfür ist gesorgt. Suchen Sie vor allem nicht nach mir, denn es wäre eine sinnlose Anstrengung und würde mir schaden. Lebend oder tot, werde ich Sie immer lieben, Mary."

"Was meint sie mit diesem Brief, Mr. Holmes? Denken Sie, dass sie auf einen Selbstmord anspielt?"

"Nein, nichts in der Art. Es ist vielleicht die beste Lösung. Ich bin überzeugt, dass sich das Ende Ihrer Probleme naht."

"Ha! Da sagen Sie aber was! Sie haben etwas gehört, Mr. Holmes. Sie haben etwas in Erfahrung gebracht. Wo sind die Juwelen?"

"Halten Sie 1000 Pfund das Stück für eine übertriebene Summe?"

"Ich würde 10000 Pfund bezahlen."

"Das ist nicht nötig. Dreitausend sind genug. Und es gibt eine kleine Belohnung, denke ich. Haben Sie ein Chequeheft? Hier ist ein Stift. Stellen Sie ihn besser auf 4000 Pfund aus."

Mit einem Gesicht wie betäubt füllte der Banker den Cheque aus. Holmes ging zu seinem Tisch, nahm ein kleines dreieckiges Stück Gold mit drei Edelsteinen heraus und warf es auf den Tisch.

Mit einem Freudenschrei umklammerte es unser Kunde.

"Sie haben es!", keuchte er. "Ich bin gerettet! Ich bin gerettet!"

Die Freude war so groß, wie es vorher sein Leiden gewesen war. Er drückte die Juwelen an seine Brust."

"Das gibt es noch etwas, was sie schulden, Mr. Holder", sagte Sherlock Holmes ernst.

"Schulden!" Er nahm einen Stift. "Nennen Sie mir die Summe und ich werde sie bezahlen."

"Nein, nicht mir schulden sie das. Sie schulden diesem noblen Burschen, Ihrem Sohn, der sich in dieser Geschichte so verhalten hat, dass ich stolz auf ihn wäre, wenn es mein eigener Sohn wäre, sollte ich jemals das Glück erfahren, einen zu haben."

"Es war also nicht Arthur, der sie genommen hat?"

"Ich sagte Ihnen bereits gestern, und wiederhole es heute, dass er es nicht war."

"Sind Sie sicher! Dann lassen Sie uns sofort zu ihm eilen, um ihm zu sagen, dass die Wahrheit nun bekannt ist."

"Er weiß es bereits. Als ich alles geklärt hatte, hatte ich ein Gespräch mit ihm. Ich sah aber, dass er mir die Geschichte nicht erzählen würde. Deshalb sagte ich ihm, was vorgefallen war, worauf er zugeben musste, dass ich Recht hatte. Er teilte mir dann noch die wengien Einzelheiten mit, die mir noch unklar waren. Die Neuigkeiten, die Sie ihm heute überbringen werden, werden seine Lippen öffnen."

"Um Gottes willen, dann erzählen Sie mir, worin das ungewöhnliche Geheimnis besteht!"

"Das werde ich tun und ich werde Ihnen auch die einzelnen Schritte erklären, die mich zu meinen Schlussfolgerungen führten. Und lassen Sie mich zuerst das sagen, was mir am schwersten fällt, zu sagen und für Sie das Schwerste sein wird, zu hören. Es gab eine Absprache zwischen Sir George Burnwell und ihrer Nichte Mary. Sie sind nun zusammen geflohen."

"Meine Mary? Unmöglich1!"

"Unglücklicherweise ist dies mehr als nur eine Möglichkeit. Es ist sicher. Weder Sie noch Ihr Sohn kannten den wahren Charakter dieses Mannes, als Sie ihn in ihre Familie einließen. Er ist einer der gefährlichsten Männer Englands, ein ruinierter Spieler, ein völlig verzweifelter Schurke, ein Mann ohne Herz oder Gewissen. Ihre Nichte wusste nichts von ihm. Als er seine Schwüre hauchte, wie er es schon tausend Mal vor ihr gemacht hatte, schmeichelte es ihr, dass allein sie sein Herz berührt hatte. Allein der Teufel weiß, was er gesagt hat, doch schließlich wurde sie sein Werkzeug und sah ihn fast jeden Abend."

"Ich kann das nicht und ich will das nicht glauben!", schrie der Banker mit aschfahlem Gesicht.

"Ich erzähle Ihnen, was letzte Nacht in Ihrem Haus vorgefallen ist. Ihre Nichte schlüpfte, als sie dachte, dass Sie ihn ihr Zimmer gegangen seien, hinunter und spach mit ihrem Liebhaber durch das Fenster, das der Zufahrt zu den Ställen zugewendet ist. Seine Fußstapfen haben sich tief in den Schnee eingedrückt, so lange stand er da. Sie erzählte ihm von dem Diadem. Sein böse Gier nach Gold entfachte bei dieser Nachricht und er unterwarf sie seinem Willen. Ich zweifle nicht daran, dass sie Sie liebt, doch es gibt Frauen, deren Liebe zu allen anderen verstummt, wenn sie einen Liebhaber haben und ich denke eine solche Frau ist sie. Kaum hatte er ihr erklärt, was er von ihr wollte, da sah sie Sie die Treppe herunterkommen. Sie schloss schnell das Fenster und erzählte Ihnen von den Eskapaden des Dienstmädchens mit dem Liebhaber, der ein Holzbein hat, was vollkommen richtig war.

"Ihr Sohn Arthur ging nach dem Gespräch mit Ihnen zu Bett, schlief jedoch, aufgrund der Unruhe, die ihm seine Schulden machten, schlecht. Mitten in der Nacht hörte er leise Schritte an seiner Tür. Er stand also auf und schaute hinaus. Er war überrascht, als er seine Cousine sehr verstohlen den Gang entlang gehen und in Ihrem Ankleideraum verschwinden sah. Vor Erstaunen wie erstarrt, schlüpfte der Bursche in die Kleider und wartete in der Dunkelheit, wie diese merkwürdige Geschichte enden würde. Plötzlich verließ sie den Raum wieder und im Licht der Flurlampe sah ihr Sohn, dass sie das kostbare Diadem in Händen hielt. Sie ging die Treppen hinunter. Er, vom Entsetzen gepackt, lief herbei und schlüpfte hinter den Vorhang in der Nähe Ihrer Tür, von wo aus er sehen konnte, was in der Halle unten geschah. Er sah, wie sie vorsichtig das Fenster öffnete und das Diadem irgendjemandem in der Dunkelheit übergab. Dann schloss sie es wieder und eilte zurück in ihr Zimmer, wobei sie ganz nahe an der Stelle vorbeiglitt, wo er hinter dem Vorhang stand.

"So lange sie noch da war, konnte er nichts tun, ohne die Frau, die er liebte, auf das grausamste zu entblößen. Doch in dem Moment, als sie weg war, wurde ihm klar, welch ein vernichtendes Unglück es für Sie bedeuten würde und wie wichtig es war, alles wieder in Ordnung zu bringen. So wie er war, rannte er hinunter, mit nackten Füßen, machte das Fenster auf und rannte die Zufahrt hinunter, wo er eine dunkle Gestalt im Mondschein sah. Sir George Burnwell versuchte zu entkommen, doch Arthur erwischte ihn. Sie kämpften miteinander. Ihr Bursche zog an einem Ende des Diadems und der Gegener am anderen. In dem Handgemenge traf Ihr Sohn Sir George am Kopf und verletzte ihn über dem Auge. Dann knackte plötzlich etwas und ihr Sohn hatte das Diadem in der Hand. Er rannte zurück und schloss das Fenster, ging hinauf zu ihrem Zimmer. Just in dem Moment, als er merkte, dass das Diadem im Handgemenge beschädigt worden war und als er versuchte, es geradezubiegen, erschienen Sie."

"Ist das möglich?", keuchte der Banker.

"Als Sie ihn nun, zu einem Zeitpunkt, als er der Meinung war, dass Sie ihm zu Dank verpflichtet seien, anfingen ihn zu beschimpfen, erregten Sie seinen Zorn. Er konnte nicht schildern, was tatsächlich vorgefallen war, ohne die verraten, die eigentlich keine Rücksicht verdient hätte. Er jedoch nahm einen ritterlichen Standpunkt ein, und behielt das Geheimnis für sich."

"Und deshalb schrie sie auf und wurde ohnmächtig, als sie das Diadem sah", schrie Mr. Holder.
"Oh mein Gott, was war ich für ein blinder Narr. Und als er fragte, ob er fünf Minuten rausgehen könne, wollte der liebe Junge auf dem Schauplatz des Kampfes nach dem fehlenden Stück schauen. Wir grausam hab ich ihn verkannt!"

"Als ich ankam", fuhr Holmes fort, "ging ich sofort um das Haus herum, um zu schauen, ob es irgendwelche Spuren im Schnee gäbe, die mir helfen könnte. Ich wusste, dass seit dem Abend vorher keiner mehr gefallen war und auch, dass es einen strengen Frost gegeben hatte, der die Abdrücke erhalten hat. Ich ging den Lieferantenweg hoch, doch dort war alles niedergetrampelt und ununterscheidbar. Etwas davon entfernt jedoch, auf der anderen pagina der Küchentür, hatte eine Frau mit einem Mann gesprochen, dessen runder Abdruck auf der einen pagina zeigte, dass er einen Holzfuß hatte. Man konnte dem sogar entnehmen, dass sie gestört worden waren, denn die Frau war eilig zur Tür zurückgerannt, wie man den tiefen Abdrücken der Zehen und den flachen der Ferse entnehmen konnte, während das Holzbein noch eine Weile gewartet hatte und sich dann entfernt hatte. Ich wusste zu diesem Zeitpunkt schon, dass dies das Dienstmädchen und ihr Geliebter sein müssten, von denen Sie mir bereits gesprochen hatten. Ich ging um das Haus herum und sah nichts mehr, außer zufällige Spuren, die ich für die der Polizei hielt. Als ich jedoch zur Zufahrt zu den Ställen kam, sah ich eine lange und komplexe Geschichte in den Schnee vor mir geschrieben.

Da war die doppelte Spur eines Mannes, der Stiefel trug und eine zweite doppelte Spur eine Mannes, der, wie ich zu meiner Freude feststelle, barfuß ging. Ich war sofort davon überzeugt, nach dem, was Sie mir erzählt hatten, dass es sich um Ihren Sohn handelte. Der erste war hin und wieder zurückgelaufen, der andere jedoch war gerannt und da seine Abdrücke sich manchmal über denen des anderen befanden, war klar, dass er ihm hinterher gelaufen war. Ich folgte ihnen und stellte fest, dass sie zum Fenster der Halle führten, wo die Stiefel, während sie warteten den Schnee platt getreten hatten. Dann bin ich zum anderen Ende der Zufahrt, welches etwas hundert Yards davon entfernt war, gegangen. Ich sah, dass sich die Stiefel umgedreht hatten, dass der Schnee aufgewühlt war, als ob ein Kampf stattgefunden hätte und dann, an der Stelle, wo ein paar Blutstropfen heruntergefallen waren, dass ich mich nicht geirrt hatte. Die Stiefel waren dann die Zufahrt hinuntergerannt und ein paar andere Tropfen zeigten, dass es derjenige war, der verletzt worden war. Als er an der Hauptstraße angekommen war, sah ich, dass die Straße geräumt worden war, so dass die Spur hier endete.

Als ich jedoch das Haus betrat, habe ich, wie Sie bemerkt haben, die Fensterbank und den Fensterrahmen mit meiner Linse  untersucht und ich konnte sofort erkennen, dass jemand nach draußen geschlüpft ist. Ich konnte da, wo der nasse Fuß aufgesetzt worden war, als jemand hereinkam, die Umrisse einer Fußsohle erkennen. Da begann ich zu verstehen, was vorgefallen war. Ein Mann hatte außerhalb des Fenster gewartet, jemand hatte die Juwelen gebracht. Die Tat wurde von ihrem Sohn beobachtet. Er verfolgte den Dieb, kämpfte mit ihm, beide zogen an dem Diadem und die Kraft der beiden zusammen verursachte den Schaden, den einer alleine nie hätte verursachen können. Er kehrte mit der Trophäe zurück, doch ein Stück hatte er in der Hand seines Gegners gelassen. Soweit war mir alles klar. Die Frage war nun, wer der Mann war und wer ihm das Diadem gebracht hatte.

Es ist eine alte Maxime von mir, dass das, was übrigbleibt, nachdem das Unmögliche ausgeschlossen worden ist, so unwahrscheinlich es auch sein möge, die Wahrheit sein muss. Da ich wusste, dass nicht Sie es waren, der es nach unten gebracht hatte, verblieben nur noch Ihre Nichte und das Dienstmädchen. Wenn es aber das Dienstmädchen war, warum hätte dann Ihr Sohn zugelassen, dass man ihn anstatt sie beschuldigt? Hierfür ließ sich kein vernünftiger Grund nennen. Da er aber seine Cousine liebte, gab es einen sehr guten Grund, warum er das Geheimnis für sich behalten sollte und zwar umso mehr, je mehr dieses Geheimnis eine Schande verbarg. Als ich mich erinnerte, dass Sie sie am Fenster gesehen hatten, und wie blass sie wurde, als sie das Diadem wieder sah, da wurde meine Vermutung zur Gewissheit.

Doch wer konnte ihr Verbündeter sein? Sicherlich ein Liebhaber, denn wer sonst hätte die Liebe, die sie für Sie fühlte, verdrängen können? Ich wusste, dass Sie selten ausgehen und ihr Freundeskreis sehr begrenzt ist. Doch unter Ihnen befand sich Sir George Burnwell. Ich hatte sagen hören, dass er unter Frauen einen zweifelhaften Ruf genießt. Er musste es sein, der diese Stiefel getragen hatte und die vermissten Juwelen zurückhielt. Obwohl er wusste, dass Arthur ihn erkannt hatte, schmeichelte es ihm wahrscheinlich, dass er in Sicherheit war, denn der Bursche konnte nichts sagen, ohne seine eigene Familie zu kompromitieren.

Ihr gesunder Menschenverstand wird Sie nun wohl ahnen lassen, welche Schritte ich als nächstes unternahm. Ich ging als Gammler verkleidet zu Sir Georges Wohnung und es gelang mir, mich mit seinem Diener anzufreuden und brachte so in Erfahrung, dass sich sein Herr am Abend vorher verletzt hatte. Schließlich verschaffte ich mir noch endgültig Gewissheit, indem ich für sechs Schilling ein paar abgetragene Schuhe seines Herrn kaufte. Mit diesen ging ich zurück nach Streatham und sah, dass sie genau in die Spuren passten."

"Ich sah gestern Abend einen schlecht gekleideten Vagabunden", sagte Mr. Holder.

"Genau. Das war ich. Ich sah also, dass ich meinen Mann geschnappt hatte, ging nach Hause und wechselte die Kleider. Dann kam der delikate Part, den ich zu spielen hatte, denn es war mir klar, dass eine Anklage vermieden werden musste, wenn man einen Skandal vermeiden wollte. Weiter war mir klar, dass ein solcher Schurke sofort sehen würde, dass unsere Hände in der Angelegenheit gebunden waren. Ich ging hin und habe mich mit ihm getroffen. Anfangs stritt er natürlich alles ab. Doch als ich ihm die Vorgänge detailgetreu schilderte, fing er an zu toben und nahm einen Totschläger von der Wand. Ich wusste jedoch, mit wem ich es zu tun hatte und hielt ihm eine Pistole an den Kopf, bevor er zuschlagen konnte. Dann wurde er ein bisschen vernünftiger. Ich sagte ihm, dass wir für die Steine etwas bezahlen würden. 1000 Pfund pro Stück. Das war das erste Mal, dass er so was wie Bedauern zeigte.

"Verfluchter Mist", sagte er. "Ich habe sie für 600 alle drei zusammen verkauft!" Ich brachte ihn schnell dazu, mir die Adresse des Empfängers zu geben und sicherte ihm zu, dass keine Anklage erhoben würde. Ich machte mich auf den Weg dahin und nach einigem Feilschen bekam ich die Steine für 1000 Pfund das Stück. Ich ging dann zu Ihrem Sohn und sagte ihm, dass alles in Ordnung sei. Schließlich ging ich um zwei Uhr, nach einem arbeitsreichen Tag, ins Bett."

"Ein Tag, der England vor einem großen Skandal bewahrt hat", sagte der Banker und stand auf. "Sir, ich finde keine Worte, um Ihnen zu danken, doch Sie sollen mich nicht, bei allem, was sie für mich getan haben, für undankbar halten. Ihr Fähigkeiten haben alles übertroffen, was ich über Sie gehört hatte. Nun muss ich aber zu meinem lieben Jungen eilen und mich für das Unrecht, das ich ihm angetan habe, entschuldigen. Was Sie mir über die arme Mary erzählten, berührte mein Herz. Nicht mal Ihr Geschick wird uns sagen können, wo sie im Moment ist."

"Ich denke, sie ist in Sicherheit", entgegnte Holmes. "Wo immer Sir George Burnwell ist, da ist auch sie. Genau so sicher ist, dass sie bald, was immer sie auch begangen hat, eine entsprechende Strafe erhalten wird."