The Adventure of the Speckled Band
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930)

On glancing over my notes of the seventy odd cases in which I have during the last eight years studied the methods of my friend Sherlock Holmes, I find many tragic, some comic, a large number merely strange, but none commonplace; for, working as he did rather for the love of his art than for the acquirement of wealth, he refused to associate himself with any investigation which did not tend towards the unusual, and even the fantastic. Of all these varied cases, however, I cannot recall any which presented more singular features than that which was associated with the well-known Surrey family of the Roylotts of Stoke Moran. The events in question occurred in the early days of my association with Holmes, when we were sharing rooms as bachelors in Baker Street. It is possible that I might have placed them upon record before, but a promise of secrecy was made at the time, from which I have only been freed during the last month by the untimely death of the lady to whom the pledge was given. It is perhaps as well that the facts should now come to light, for I have reasons to know that there are widespread rumours as to the death of Dr. Grimesby Roylott which tend to make the matter even more terrible than the truth.

It was early in April in the year '83 that I woke one morning to find Sherlock Holmes standing, fully dressed, by the side of my bed. He was a late riser, as a rule, and as the clock on the mantelpiece showed me that it was only a quarter-past seven, I blinked up at him in some surprise, and perhaps just a little resentment, for I was myself regular in my habits.

"Very sorry to knock you up, Watson," said he, "but it's the common lot this morning. Mrs. Hudson has been knocked up, she retorted upon me, and I on you."

"What is it, then — a fire?"

"No; a client. It seems that a young lady has arrived in a considerable state of excitement, who insists upon seeing me. She is waiting now in the sitting-room. Now, when young ladies wander about the metropolis at this hour of the morning, and knock sleepy people up out of their beds, I presume that it is something very pressing which they have to communicate. Should it prove to be an interesting case, you would, I am sure, wish to follow it from the outset. I thought, at any rate, that I should call you and give you the chance."

"My dear fellow, I would not miss it for anything."

I had no keener pleasure than in following Holmes in his professional investigations, and in admiring the rapid deductions, as swift as intuitions, and yet always founded on a logical basis with which he unravelled the problems which were submitted to him. I rapidly threw on my clothes and was ready in a few minutes to accompany my friend down to the sitting-room. A lady dressed in black and heavily veiled, who had been sitting in the window, rose as we entered.

"Good-morning, madam," said Holmes cheerily. "My name is Sherlock Holmes. This is my intimate friend and associate, Dr. Watson, before whom you can speak as freely as before myself. Ha! I am glad to see that Mrs. Hudson has had the good sense to light the fire. Pray draw up to it, and I shall order you a cup of hot coffee, for I observe that you are shivering."

"lt is not cold which makes me shiver," said the woman in a low voice, changing her seat as requested.

"What, then?"

"It is fear, Mr. Holmes. It is terror." She raised her veil as she spoke, and we could see that she was indeed in a pitiable state of agitation, her face all drawn and gray, with restless frightened eyes, like those of some hunted animal. Her features and figure were those of a woman of thirty, but her hair was shot with premature gray, and her expression was weary and haggard. Sherlock Holmes ran her over with one of his quick, all-comprehensive glances.

"You must not fear," said he soothingly, bending forward and patting her forearm. "We shall soon set matters right, I have no doubt. You have come in by train this morning, I see."

"You know me, then?"

"No, but I observe the second half of a return ticket in the palm of your left glove. You must have started early, and yet you had a good drive in a dog-cart, along heavy roads, before you reached the station."

The lady gave a violent start and stared in bewilderment at my companion.

"There is no mystery, my dear madam," said he, smiling. "The left arm of your jacket is spattered with mud in no less than seven places. The marks are perfectly fresh. There is no vehicle save a dog-cart which throws up mud in that way, and then only when you sit on the left-hand side of the driver."

"Whatever your reasons may be, you are perfectly correct," said she. "I started from home before six, reached Leatherhead at twenty past, and came in by the first train to Waterloo. Sir, I can stand this strain no longer; I shall go mad if it continues. I have no one to turn to — none, save only one, who cares for me, and he, poor fellow, can be of little aid. I have heard of you, Mr. Holmes; I have heard of you from Mrs. Farintosh, whom you helped in the hour of her sore need. It was from her that I had your address. Oh, sir, do you not think that you could help me, too, and at least throw a little light through the dense darkness which surrounds me? At present it is out of my power to reward you for your services, but in a month or six weeks I shall be married, with the control of my own income, and then at least you shall not find me ungrateful."

Holmes turned to his desk and, unlocking it, drew out a small case-book, which he consulted.

"Farintosh," said he. "Ah yes, I recall the case; it was concerned with an opal tiara. I think it was before your time, Watson. I can only say, madam, that I shall be happy to devote the same care to your case as I did to that of your friend. As to reward, my profession is its own reward; but you are at liberty to defray whatever expenses I may be put to, at the time which suits you best. And now I beg that you will lay before us everything that may help us in forming an opinion upon the matter."

"Alas!" replied our visitor, "the very horror of my situation lies in the fact that my fears are so vague, and my suspicions depend so entirely upon small points, which might seem trivial to another, that even he to whom of all others I have a right to look for help and advice looks upon all that I tell him about it as the fancies of a nervous woman. He does not say so, but I can read it from his soothing answers and averted eyes. But I have heard, Mr. Holmes, that you can see deeply into the manifold wickedness of the human heart. You may advise me how to walk amid the dangers which encompass me."

"I am all attention, madam."

"My name is Helen Stoner, and I am living with my stepfather, who is the last survivor of one of the oldest Saxon families in England, the Roylotts of Stoke Moran, on the western border of Surrey."

Holmes nodded his head. "The name is familiar to me," said he.

"The family was at one time among the richest in England, and the estates extended over the borders into Berkshire in the north, and Hampshire in the west. In the last century, however, four successive heirs were of a dissolute and wasteful disposition, and the family ruin was eventually completed by a gambler in the days of the Regency. Nothing was left save a few acres of ground, and the two-hundred-year-old house, which is itself crushed under a heavy mortgage. The last squire dragged out his existence there, living the horrible life of an aristocratic pauper; but his only son, my stepfather, seeing that he must adapt himself to the new conditions, obtained an advance from a relative, which enabled him to take a medical degree and went out to Calcutta, where, by his professional skill and his force of character, he established a large practice. In a fit of anger, however, caused by some robberies which had been perpetrated in the house, he beat his native butler to death and narrowly escaped a capital sentence. As it was, he suffered a long term of imprisonment and afterwards returned to England a morose and disappointed man.

"When Dr. Roylott was in India he married my mother, Mrs. Stoner, the young widow of Major-General Stoner, of the Bengal Artillery. My sister Julia and I were twins, and we were only two years old at the time of my mother's re-marriage. She had a considerable sum of money — not less than 1000 pounds a year — and this she bequeathed to Dr. Roylott entirely while we resided with him, with a provision that a certain annual sum should be allowed to each of us in the event of our marriage. Shortly after our return to England my mother died — she was killed eight years ago in a railway accident near Crewe. Dr. Roylott then abandoned his attempts to establish himself in practice in London and took us to live with him in the old ancestral house at Stoke Moran. The money which my mother had left was enough for all our wants, and there seemed to be no obstacle to our happiness.

"But a terrible change came over our stepfather about this time. Instead of making friends and exchanging visits with our neighbours, who had at first been overjoyed to see a Roylott of Stoke Moran back in the old family seat, he shut himself up in his house and seldom came out save to indulge in ferocious quarrels with whoever might cross his path. Violence of temper approaching to mania has been hereditary in the men of the family, and in my stepfather's case it had, I believe, been intensified by his long residence in the tropics. A series of disgraceful brawls took place, two of which ended in the police court, until at last he became the terror of the village, and the folks would fly at his approach, for he is a man of immense strength, and absolutely uncontrollable in his anger.

"Last week he hurled the local blacksmith over a parapet into a stream, and it was only by paying over all the money which I could gather together that I was able to avert another public exposure. He had no friends at all save the wandering gypsies, and he would give these vagabonds leave to encamp upon the few acres of bramble-covered land which represent the family estate, and would accept in return the hospitality of their tents, wandering away with them sometimes for weeks on end. He has a passion also for Indian animals, which are sent over to him by a correspondent, and he has at this moment a cheetah and a baboon, which wander freely over his grounds and are feared by the villagers almost as much as their master.

"You can imagine from what I say that my poor sister Julia and I had no great pleasure in our lives. No servant would stay with us, and for a long time we did all the work of the house. She was but thirty at the time of her death, and yet her hair had already begun to whiten, even as mine has."

"Your sister is dead, then?"

"She died just two years ago, and it is of her death that I wish to speak to you. You can understand that, living the life which I have described, we were little likely to see anyone of our own age and position. We had, however, an aunt, my mother's maiden sister, Miss Honoria Westphail, who lives near Harrow, and we were occasionally allowed to pay short visits at this lady's house. Julia went there at Christmas two years ago, and met there a half-pay major of marines, to whom she became engaged. My stepfather learned of the engagement when my sister returned and offered no objection to the marriage; but wlthin a fortnight of the day which had been fixed for the wedding, the terrible event occurred which has deprived me of my only companion."

Sherlock Holmes had been leaning back in his chair with his eyes closed and his head sunk in a cushion, but he half opened his lids now and glanced across at his visitor.

"Pray be precise as to details," said he.

"It is easy for me to be so, for every event of that dreadful time is seared into my memory. The manor-house is, as I have already said, very old, and only one wing is now inhabited. The bedrooms in this wing are on the ground floor, the sitting-rooms being in the central block of the buildings. Of these bedrooms the first is Dr. Roylott's, the second my sister's, and the third my own. There is no communication between them, but they all open out into the same corridor. Do I make myself plain?"

"Perfectly so."

"The windows of the three rooms open out upon the lawn. That fatal night Dr. Roylott had gone to his room early, though we knew that he had not retired to rest, for my sister was troubled by the smell of the strong Indian cigars which it was his custom to smoke. She left her room, therefore, and came into mine, where she sat for some time, chatting about her approaching wedding. At eleven o'clock she rose to leave me, but she paused at the door and looked back.

" 'Tell me, Helen,' said she, 'have you ever heard anyone whistle in the dead of the night?'

" 'Never,' said I.

" 'I suppose that you could not possibly whistle, yourself, in your sleep?'

" 'Certainly not. But why?'

" 'Because during the last few nights I have always, about three in the morning, heard a low, clear whistle. I am a light sleeper, and it has awakened me. I cannot tell where it came from perhaps from the next room, perhaps from the lawn. I thought that I would just ask you whether you had heard it.'

" 'No, I have not. It must be those wretched gypsies in the plantation.'

" 'Very likely. And yet if it were on the lawn, I wonder that you did not hear it also.'

" 'Ah, but I sleep more heavily than you.'

" 'Well, it is of no great consequence, at any rate.' She smiled back at me, closed my door, and a few moments later I heard her key turn in the lock."

"Indeed," said Holmes. "Was it your custom always to lock yourselves in at night?"

"Always."

"And why?"

"I think that I mentioned to you that the doctor kept a cheetah and a baboon. We had no feeling of security unless our doors were locked."

"Quite so. Pray proceed with your statement."

"I could not sleep that night. A vague feeling of impending misfortune impressed me. My sister and I, you will recollect, were twins, and you know how subtle are the links which bind two souls which are so closely allied. It was a wild night. The wind was howling outside, and the rain was beating and splashing against the windows. Suddenly, amid all the hubbub of the gale, there burst forth the wild scream of a terrified woman. I knew that it was my sister's voice. I sprang from my bed, wrapped a shawl round me, and rushed into the corridor. As I opened my door I seemed to hear a low whistle, such as my sister described, and a few moments later a clanging sound, as if a mass of metal had fallen. As I ran down the passage, my sister's door was unlocked, and revolved slowly upon its hinges. I stared at it horror-stricken, not knowing what was about to issue from it. By the light of the corridor-lamp I saw my sister appear at the opening, her face blanched with terror, her hands groping for help, her whole figure swaying to and fro like that of a drunkard. I ran to her and threw my arms round her, but at that moment her knees seemed to give way and she fell to the ground. She writhed as one who is in terrible pain, and her limbs were dreadfully convulsed. At first I thought that she had not recognized me, but as I bent over her she suddenly shrieked out in a voice which I shall never forget, 'Oh, my God! Helen! It was the band! The speckled band!' There was something else which she would fain have said, and she stabbed with her finger into the air in the direction of the doctor's room, but a fresh convulsion seized her and choked her words. I rushed out, calling loudly for my stepfather, and I met him hastening from his room in his dressing-gown. When he reached my sister's side she was unconscious, and though he poured brandy down her throat and sent for medical aid from the village, all efforts were in vain, for she slowly sank and died without having recovered her consciousness. Such was the dreadful end of my beloved sister."

One moment," said Holmes, "are you sure about this whistle and metallic sound? Could you swear to it?"

"That was what the county coroner asked me at the inquiry. It is my strong impression that I heard it, and yet, among the crash of the gale and the creaking of an old house, I may possibly have been deceived."

"Was your sister dressed?"

"No, she was in her night-dress. In her right hand was found the charred stump of a match, and in her left a match-box."

"Showing that she had struck a light and looked about her when the alarm took place. That is important. And what conclusions did the coroner come to?"

"He investigated the case with great care, for Dr. Roylott's conduct had long been notorious in the county, but he was unable to find any satisfactory cause of death. My evidence showed that the door had been fastened upon the inner side, and the windows were blocked by old-fashioned shutters with broad iron bars, which were secured every night. The walls were carefully sounded, and were shown to be quite solid all round, and the flooring was also thoroughly examined, with the same result. The chimney is wide, but is barred up by four large staples. It is certain, therefore, that my sister was quite alone when she met her end. Besides, there were no marks of any violence upon her."

"How about poison?"

"The doctors examined her for it, but without success."

"What do you think that this unfortunate lady died of, then?"

"It is my belief that she died of pure fear and nervous shock, though what it was that frightened her I cannot imagine."

"Were there gypsies in the plantation at the time?"

"Yes, there are nearly always some there."

"Ah, and what did you gather from this allusion to a band — a speckled band?"

"Sometimes I have thought that it was merely the wild talk of delirium, sometimes that it may have referred to some band of people, perhaps to these very gypsies in the plantation. I do not know whether the spotted handkerchiefs which so many of them wear over their heads might have suggested the strange adjective which she used."

Holmes shook his head like a man who is far from being satisfied.

"These are very deep waters," said he; "pray go on with your narrative."

"Two years have passed since then, and my life has been until lately lonelier than ever. A month ago, however, a dear friend, whom I have known for many years, has done me the honour to ask my hand in marriage. His name is Armitage — Percy Armitage — the second son of Mr. Armitage, of Crane Water, near Reading. My stepfather has offered no opposition to the match, and we are to be married in the course of the spring. Two days ago some repairs were started in the west wing of the building, and my bedroom wall has been pierced, so that I have had to move into the chamber in which my sister died, and to sleep in the very bed in which she slept. Imagine, then, my thrill of terror when last night, as I lay awake, thinking over her terrible fate, I suddenly heard in the silence of the night the low whistle which had been the herald of her own death. I sprang up and lit the lamp, but nothing was to be seen in the room. I was too shaken to go to bed again, however, so I dressed, and as soon as it was daylight I slipped down, got a dog-cart at the Crown Inn, which is opposite, and drove to Leatherhead, from whence I have come on this morning with the one object of seeing you and asking your advice."

"You have done wisely," said my friend. "But have you told me all?"

"Yes, all."

"Miss Roylott, you have not. You are screening your stepfather."

"Why, what do you mean?"

For answer Holmes pushed back the frill of black lace which fringed the hand that lay upon our visitor's knee. Five little livid spots, the marks of four fingers and a thumb, were printed upon the white wrist.

"You have been cruelly used," said Holmes.

The lady coloured deeply and covered over her injured wrist. "He is a hard man," she said, "and perhaps he hardly knows his own strength."

There was a long silence, during which Holmes leaned his chin upon his hands and stared into the crackling fire.

"This is a very deep business," he said at last. "There are a thousand details which I should desire to know before I decide upon our course of action. Yet we have not a moment to lose. If we were to come to Stoke Moran to-day, would it be possible for us to see over these rooms without the knowledge of your stepfather?"

"As it happens, he spoke of coming into town to-day upon some most important business. It is probable that he will be away all day, and that there would be nothing to disturb you. We have a housekeeper now, but she is old and foolish, and I could easily get her out of the way."

"Excellent. You are not averse to this trip, Watson?"

"By no means."

"Then we shall both come. What are you going to do yourself?"

"I have one or two things which I would wish to do now that I am in town. But I shall return by the twelve o'clock train, so as to be there in time for your coming."

"And you may expect us early in the afternoon. I have myself some small business matters to attend to. Will you not wait and breakfast?"

"No, I must go. My heart is lightened already since I have confided my trouble to you. I shall look forward to seeing you again this afternoon." She dropped her thick black veil over her face and glided from the room.

"And what do you think of it all, Watson?" asked Sherlock Holmes, leaning back in his chair.

"It seems to me to be a most dark and sinister business."

"Dark enough and sinister enough."

"Yet if the lady is correct in saying that the flooring and walls are sound, and that the door, window, and chimney are impassable, then her sister must have been undoubtedly alone when she met her mysterious end."

"What becomes, then, of these nocturnal whistles, and what of the very peculiar words of the dying woman?"

"I cannot think."

"When you combine the ideas of whistles at night, the presence of a band of gypsies who are on intimate terms with this old doctor, the fact that we have every reason to believe that the doctor has an interest in preventing his stepdaughter's marriage, the dying allusion to a band, and, finally, the fact that Miss Helen Stoner heard a metallic clang, which might have been caused by one of those metal bars that secured the shutters falling back into its place, I think that there is good ground to think that the mystery may be cleared along those lines."

"But what, then, did the gypsies do?"

"I cannot imagine."

"I see many objections to any such theory."

"And so do I. It is precisely for that reason that we are going to Stoke Moran this day. I want to see whether the objections are fatal, or if they may be explained away. But what in the name of the devil!"

The ejaculation had been drawn from my companion by the fact that our door had been suddenly dashed open, and that a huge man had framed himself in the aperture. His costume was a peculiar mixture of the professional and of the agricultural, having a black top-hat, a long frock-coat, and a pair of high gaiters, with a hunting-crop swinging in his hand. So tall was he that his hat actually brushed the cross bar of the doorway, and his breadth seemed to span it across from side to side. A large face, seared with a thousand wrinkles, burned yellow with the sun, and marked with every evil passion, was turned from one to the other of us, while his deep-set, bile-shot eyes, and his high, thin, fleshless nose, gave him somewhat the resemblance to a fierce old bird of prey.

"Which of you is Holmes?" asked this apparition.

"My name, sir; but you have the advantage of me," said my companion quietly.

"I am Dr. Grimesby Roylott, of Stoke Moran."

"Indeed, Doctor," said Holmes blandly. "Pray take a seat."

"I will do nothing of the kind. My stepdaughter has been here. I have traced her. What has she been saying to you?"

"It is a little cold for the time of the year," said Holmes.

"What has she been saying to you?" screamed the old man furiously.

"But I have heard that the crocuses promise well," continued my companion imperturbably.

"Ha! You put me off, do you?" said our new visitor, taking a step forward and shaking his hunting-crop. "I know you, you scoundrel! I have heard of you before. You are Holmes, the meddler."

My friend smiled.

"Holmes, the busybody!"

His smile broadened.

"Holmes, the Scotland Yard Jack-in-office!"

Holmes chuckled heartily. "Your conversation is most entertaining," said he. "When you go out close the door, for there is a decided draught."

"I will go when I have said my say. Don't you dare to meddle with my affairs. I know that Miss Stoner has been here. I traced her! I am a dangerous man to fall foul of! See here." He stepped swiftly forward, seized the poker, and bent it into a curve with his huge brown hands.

"See that you keep yourself out of my grip," he snarled, and hurling the twisted poker into the fireplace he strode out of the room.

"He seems a very amiable person," said Holmes, laughing. "I am not quite so bulky, but if he had remained I might have shown him that my grip was not much more feeble than his own." As he spoke he picked up the steel poker and, with a sudden effort, straightened it out again.

"Fancy his having the insolence to confound me with the official detective force! This incident gives zest to our investigation, however, and I only trust that our little friend will not suffer from her imprudence in allowing this brute to trace her. And now, Watson, we shall order breakfast, and afterwards I shall walk down to Doctors' Commons, where I hope to get some data which may help us in this matter."

It was nearly one o'clock when Sherlock Holmes returned from his excursion. He held in his hand a sheet of blue paper, scrawled over with notes and figures.

"I have seen the will of the deceased wife," said he. "To determine its exact meaning I have been obliged to work out the present prices of the investments with which it is concerned. The total income, which at the time of the wife's death was little short of 1100 pounds, is now, through the fall in agricultural prices, not more than 750 pounds. Each daughter can claim an income of 250 pounds, in case of marriage. It is evident, therefore, that if both girls had married, this beauty would have had a mere pittance, while even one of them would cripple him to a very serious extent. My morning's work has not been wasted, since it has proved that he has the very strongest motives for standing in the way of anything of the sort. And now, Watson, this is too serious for dawdling, especially as the old man is aware that we are interesting ourselves in his affairs; so if you are ready, we shall call a cab and drive to Waterloo. I should be very much obliged if you would slip your revolver into your pocket. An Eley's No. 2 is an excellent argument with gentlemen who can twist steel pokers into knots. That and a tooth-brush are, I think all that we need."

At Waterloo we were fortunate in catching a train for Leatherhead, where we hired a trap at the station inn and drove for four or five miles through the lovely Surrey lanes. It was a perfect day, with a bright sun and a few fleecy clouds in the heavens. The trees and wayside hedges were just throwing out their first green shoots, and the air was full of the pleasant smell of the moist earth. To me at least there was a strange contrast between the sweet promise of the spring and this sinister quest upon which we were engaged. My companion sat in the front of the trap, his arms folded, his hat pulled down over his eyes, and his chin sunk upon his breast, buried in the deepest thought. Suddenly, however, he started, tapped me on the shoulder, and pointed over the meadows

"Look there!" said he.

A heavily timbered park stretched up in a gentle slope, thickening into a grove at the highest point. From amid the branches there jutted out the gray gables and high roof-tree of a very old mansion.

"Stoke Moran?" said he.

"Yes, sir, that be the house of Dr. Grimesby Roylott," remarked the driver.

"There is some building going on there," said Holmes; "that is where we are going."

"There's the village," said the driver, pointing to a cluster of roofs some distance to the left; "but if you want to get to the house, you'll find it shorter to get over this stile, and so by the foot-path over the fields. There it is, where the lady is walking."

"And the lady, I fancy, is Miss Stoner," observed Holmes, shading his eyes. "Yes, I think we had better do as you suggest."

We got off, paid our fare, and the trap rattled back on its way to Leatherhead.

"I thought it as well," said Holmes as we climbed the stile, "that this fellow should think we had come here as architects, or on some definite business. It may stop his gossip. Good afternoon, Miss Stoner. You see that we have been as good as our word."

Our client of the morning had hurried forward to meet us with a face which spoke her joy. "I have been waiting so eagerly for you," she cried, shaking hands with us warmly. "All has turned out splendidly. Dr. Roylott has gone to town, and it is unlikely that he will be back before evening."

"We have had the pleasure of making the doctor's acquaintance," said Holmes, and in a few words he sketched out what had occurred. Miss Stoner turned white to the lips as she listened.

"Good heavens!" she cried, "he has followed me, then."

"So it appears."

"He is so cunning that I never know when I am safe from him. What will he say when he returns?"

"He must guard himself, for he may find that there is someone more cunning than himself upon his track. You must lock yourself up from him tonight. If he is violent, we shall take you away to your aunt's at Harrow. Now, we must make the best use of our time, so kindly take us at once to the rooms which we are to examine."

The building was of gray, lichen-blotched stone, with a high central portion and two curving wings, like the claws of a crab, thrown out on each side. In one of these wings the windows were broken and blocked with wooden boards, while the roof was partly caved in, a picture of ruin. The central portion was in little better repair, but the right-hand block was comparatively modern, and the blinds in the windows, with the blue smoke curling up from the chimneys, showed that this was where the family resided. Some scaffolding had been erected against the end wall, and the stone-work had been broken into, but there were no signs of any workmen at the moment of our visit. Holmes walked slowly up and down the ill-trimmed lawn and examined with deep attention the outsides of the windows.

"This, I take it, belongs to the room in which you used to sleep, the centre one to your sister's, and the one next to the main building to Dr. Roylott's chamber?"

"Exactly so. But I am now sleeping in the middle one."

"Pending the alterations, as I understand. By the way, there does not seem to be any very pressing need for repairs at that end wall."

"There were none. I believe that it was an excuse to move me from my room."

"Ah! that is suggestive. Now, on the other side of this narrow wing runs the corridor from which these three rooms open. There are windows in it, of course?" "Yes, but very small ones. Too narrow for anyone to pass through."

"As you both locked your doors at night, your rooms were unapproachable from that side. Now, would you have the kindness to go into your room and bar your shutters?"

Miss Stoner did so, and Holmes, after a careful examination through the open window, endeavoured in every way to force the shutter open, but without success. There was no slit through which a knife could be passed to raise the bar. Then with his lens he tested the hinges, but they were of solid iron, built firmly into the massive masonry. "Hum!" said he, scratching his chin in some perplexity, "my theory certainly presents some difficulties. No one could pass these shutters if they were bolted. Well, we shall see if the inside throws any light upon the matter."

A small side door led into the whitewashed corridor from which the three bedrooms opened. Holmes refused to examine the third chamber, so we passed at once to the second, that in which Miss Stoner was now sleeping, and in which her sister had met with her fate. It was a homely little room, with a low ceiling and a gaping fireplace, after the fashion of old country-houses. A brown chest of drawers stood in one corner, a narrow white-counterpaned bed in another, and a dressing-table on the left-hand side of the window. These articles, with two small wicker-work chairs, made up all the furniture in the room save for a square of Wilton carpet in the centre. The boards round and the panelling of the walls were of brown, worm-eaten oak, so old and discoloured that it may have dated from the original building of the house. Holmes drew one of the chairs into a corner and sat silent, while his eyes travelled round and round and up and down, taking in every detail of the apartment.

"Where does that bell communicate with?" he asked at last pointing to a thick bell-rope which hung down beside the bed, the tassel actually lying upon the pillow.

"It goes to the housekeeper's room."

"It looks newer than the other things?"

"Yes, it was only put there a couple of years ago."

"Your sister asked for it, I suppose?"

"No, I never heard of her using it. We used always to get what we wanted for ourselves."

"Indeed, it seemed unnecessary to put so nice a bell-pull there. You will excuse me for a few minutes while I satisfy myself as to this floor." He threw himself down upon his face with his lens in his hand and crawled swiftly backward and forward, examining minutely the cracks between the boards. Then he did the same with the wood-work with which the chamber was panelled. Finally he walked over to the bed and spent some time in staring at it and in running his eye up and down the wall. Finally he took the bell-rope in his hand and gave it a brisk tug.

"Why, it's a dummy," said he.

"Won't it ring?"

"No, it is not even attached to a wire. This is very interesting. You can see now that it is fastened to a hook just above where the little opening for the ventilator is."

"How very absurd! I never noticed that before."

"Very strange!" muttered Holmes, pulling at the rope. "There are one or two very singular points about this room. For example, what a fool a builder must be to open a ventilator into another room, when, with the same trouble, he might have communicated with the outside air!"

"That is also quite modern," said the lady.

"Done about the same time as the bell-rope?" remarked Holmes.

"Yes, there were several little changes carried out about that time."

"They seem to have been of a most interesting character — dummy bell-ropes, and ventilators which do not ventilate. With your permission, Miss Stoner, we shall now carry our researches into the inner apartment."

Dr. Grimesby Roylott's chamber was larger than that of his stepdaughter, but was as plainly furnished. A camp-bed, a small wooden shelf full of books, mostly of a technical character, an armchair beside the bed, a plain wooden chair against the wall, a round table, and a large iron safe were the principal things which met the eye. Holmes walked slowly round and examined each and all of them with the keenest interest.

"What's in here?" he asked, tapping the safe.

"My stepfather's business papers."

"Oh! you have seen inside, then?"

"Only once, some years ago. I remember that it was full of papers."

"There isn't a cat in it, for example?"

"No. What a strange idea!"

"Well, look at this!" He took up a small saucer of milk which stood on the top of it.

"No; we don't keep a cat. But there is a cheetah and a baboon."

"Ah, yes, of course! Well, a cheetah is just a big cat, and yet a saucer of milk does not go very far in satisfying its wants, I daresay. There is one point which I should wish to determine." He squatted down in front of the wooden chair and examined the seat of it with the greatest attention.

"Thank you. That is quite settled," said he, rising and putting his lens in his pocket. "Hello! Here is something interesting!"

The object which had caught his eye was a small dog lash hung on one corner of the bed. The lash, however, was curled upon itself and tied so as to make a loop of whipcord.

"What do you make of that, Watson?"

"It's a common enough lash. But I don't know why it should be tied."

"That is not quite so common, is it? Ah, me! it's a wicked world, and when a clever man turns his brains to crime it is the worst of all. I think that I have seen enough now, Miss Stoner, and with your permission we shall walk out upon the lawn."

I had never seen my friend's face so grim or his brow so dark as it was when we turned from the scene of this investigation. We had walked several times up and down the lawn, neither Miss Stoner nor myself liking to break in upon his thoughts before he roused himself from his reverie.

"It is very essential, Miss Stoner," said he, "that you should absolutely follow my advice in every respect."

"I shall most certainly do so."

"The matter is too serious for any hesitation. Your life may depend upon your compliance."

"I assure you that I am in your hands."

"In the first place, both my friend and I must spend the night in your room."

Both Miss Stoner and I gazed at him in astonishment.

"Yes, it must be so. Let me explain. I believe that that is the village inn over there?"

"Yes, that is the Crown."

"Very good. Your windows would be visible from there?"

"Certainly."

"You must confine yourself to your room, on pretence of a headache, when your stepfather comes back. Then when you hear him retire for the night, you must open the shutters of your window, undo the hasp, put your lamp there as a signal to us, and then withdraw quietly with everything which you are likely to want into the room which you used to occupy. I have no doubt that, in spite of the repairs, you could manage there for one night."

"Oh, yes, easily."

"The rest you will leave in our hands."

"But what will you do?"

"We shall spend the night in your room, and we shall investigate the cause of this noise which has disturbed you."

"I believe, Mr. Holmes, that you have already made up your mind," said Miss Stoner, laying her hand upon my companion's sleeve.

"Perhaps I have."

"Then, for pity's sake, tell me what was the cause of my sister's death."

"I should prefer to have clearer proofs before I speak."

"You can at least tell me whether my own thought is correct, and if she died from some sudden fright."

"No, I do not think so. I think that there was probably some more tangible cause. And now, Miss Stoner, we must leave you for if Dr. Roylott returned and saw us our journey would be in vain. Good-bye, and be brave, for if you will do what I have told you you may rest assured that we shall soon drive away the dangers that threaten you."

Sherlock Holmes and I had no difficulty in engaging a bedroom and sitting-room at the Crown Inn. They were on the upper floor, and from our window we could command a view of the avenue gate, and of the inhabited wing of Stoke Moran Manor House. At dusk we saw Dr. Grimesby Roylott drive past, his huge form looming up beside the little figure of the lad who drove him. The boy had some slight difficulty in undoing the heavy iron gates, and we heard the hoarse roar of the doctor's voice and saw the fury with which he shook his clinched fists at him. The trap drove on, and a few minutes later we saw a sudden light spring up among the trees as the lamp was lit in one of the sitting-rooms.

"Do you know, Watson," said Holmes as we sat together in the gathering darkness, "I have really some scruples as to taking you to-night. There is a distinct element of danger."

"Can I be of assistance?"

"Your presence might be invaluable."

"Then I shall certainly come."

"It is very kind of you."

"You speak of danger. You have evidently seen more in these rooms than was visible to me."

"No, but I fancy that I may have deduced a little more. I imagine that you saw all that I did."

"I saw nothing remarkable save the bell-rope, and what purpose that could answer I confess is more than I can imagine."

"You saw the ventilator, too?"

"Yes, but I do not think that it is such a very unusual thing to have a small opening between two rooms. It was so small that a rat could hardly pass through."

"I knew that we should find a ventilator before ever we came to Stoke Moran."

"My dear Holmes!"

"Oh, yes, I did. You remember in her statement she said that her sister could smell Dr. Roylott's cigar. Now, of course that suggested at once that there must be a communication between the two rooms. It could only be a small one, or it would have been remarked upon at the coroner's inquiry. I deduced a ventilator."

"But what harm can there be in that?"

"Well, there is at least a curious coincidence of dates. A ventilator is made, a cord is hung, and a lady who sleeps in the bed dies. Does not that strike you?"

"I cannot as yet see any connection."

"Did you observe anything very peculiar about that bed?"

"No."

"It was clamped to the floor. Did you ever see a bed fastened like that before?"

"I cannot say that I have."

"The lady could not move her bed. It must always be in the same relative position to the ventilator and to the rope — or so we may call it, since it was clearly never meant for a bell-pull."

"Holmes," I cried, "I seem to see dimly what you are hinting at. We are only just in time to prevent some subtle and horrible crime."

"Subtle enough and horrible enough. When a doctor does go wrong he is the first of criminals. He has nerve and he has knowledge. Palmer and Pritchard were among the heads of their profession. This man strikes even deeper, but I think, Watson, that we shall be able to strike deeper still. But we shall have horrors enough before the night is over; for goodness' sake let us have a quiet pipe and turn our minds for a few hours to something more cheerful."

* * *

About nine o'clock the light among the trees was extinguished, and all was dark in the direction of the Manor House. Two hours passed slowly away, and then, suddenly, just at the stroke of eleven, a single bright light shone out right in front of us.

"That is our signal," said Holmes, springing to his feet; "it comes from the middle window."

As we passed out he exchanged a few words with the landlord, explaining that we were going on a late visit to an acquaintance, and that it was possible that we might spend the night there. A moment later we were out on the dark road, a chill wind blowing in our faces, and one yellow light twinkling in front of us through the gloom to guide us on our sombre errand.

There was little difficulty in entering the grounds, for unrepaired breaches gaped in the old park wall. Making our way among the trees, we reached the lawn, crossed it, and were about to enter through the window when out from a clump of laurel bushes there darted what seemed to be a hideous and distorted child, who threw itself upon the grass with writhing limbs and then ran swiftly across the lawn into the darkness.

"My God!" I whispered; "did you see it?"

Holmes was for the moment as startled as I. His hand closed like a vise upon my wrist in his agitation. Then he broke into a low laugh and put his lips to my ear.

"It is a nice household," he murmured. "That is the baboon."

I had forgotten the strange pets which the doctor affected. There was a cheetah, too; perhaps we might find it upon our shoulders at any moment. I confess that I felt easier in my mind when, after following Holmes's example and slipping off my shoes, I found myself inside the bedroom. My companion noiselessly closed the shutters, moved the lamp onto the table, and cast his eyes round the room. All was as we had seen it in the daytime. Then creeping up to me and making a trumpet of his hand, he whispered into my ear again so gently that it was all that I could do to distinguish the words:

"The least sound would be fatal to our plans."

I nodded to show that I had heard.

"We must sit without light. He would see it through the ventilator."

I nodded again.

"Do not go asleep; your very life may depend upon it. Have your pistol ready in case we should need it. I will sit on the side of the bed, and you in that chair."

I took out my revolver and laid it on the corner of the table.

Holmes had brought up a long thin cane, and this he placed upon the bed beside him. By it he laid the box of matches and the stump of a candle. Then he turned down the lamp, and we were left in darkness.

How shall I ever forget that dreadful vigil? I could not hear a sound, not even the drawing of a breath, and yet I knew that my companion sat open-eyed, within a few feet of me, in the same state of nervous tension in which I was myself. The shutters cut off the least ray of light, and we waited in absolute darkness. From outside came the occasional cry of a night-bird, and once at our very window a long drawn catlike whine, which told us that the cheetah was indeed at liberty. Far away we could hear the deep tones of the parish clock, which boomed out every quarter of an hour. How long they seemed, those quarters! Twelve struck, and one and two and three, and still we sat waiting silently for whatever might befall.

Suddenly there was the momentary gleam of a light up in the direction of the ventilator, which vanished immediately, but was succeeded by a strong smell of burning oil and heated metal. Someone in the next room had lit a dark-lantern. I heard a gentle sound of movement, and then all was silent once more, though the smell grew stronger. For half an hour I sat with straining ears. Then suddenly another sound became audible — a very gentle, soothing sound, like that of a small jet of steam escaping continually from a kettle. The instant that we heard it, Holmes sprang from the bed, struck a match, and lashed furiously with his cane at the bell-pull.

"You see it, Watson?" he yelled. "You see it?"

But I saw nothing. At the moment when Holmes struck the light I heard a low, clear whistle, but the sudden glare flashing into my weary eyes made it impossible for me to tell what it was at which my friend lashed so savagely. I could, however, see that his face was deadly pale and filled with horror and loathing.-

He had ceased to strike and was gazing up at the ventilator when suddenly there broke from the silence of the night the most horrible cry to which I have ever listened. It swelled up louder and louder, a hoarse yell of pain and fear and anger all mingled in the one dreadful shriek. They say that away down in the village, and even in the distant parsonage, that cry raised the sleepers from their beds. It struck cold to our hearts, and I stood gazing at Holmes, and he at me, until the last echoes of it had died away into the silence from which it rose.

"What can it mean?" I gasped.

"It means that it is all over," Holmes answered. "And perhaps, after all, it is for the best. Take your pistol, and we will enter Dr. Roylott's room."

With a grave face he lit the lamp and led the way down the corridor. Twice he struck at the chamber door without any reply from within. Then he turned the handle and entered, I at his heels, with the cocked pistol in my hand.

It was a singular sight which met our eyes. On the table stood a dark-lantern with the shutter half open, throwing a brilliant beam of light upon the iron safe, the door of which was ajar. Beside this table, on the wooden chair, sat Dr. Grimesby Roylott clad in a long gray dressing-gown, his bare ankles protruding beneath, and his feet thrust into red heelless Turkish slippers. Across his lap lay the short stock with the long lash which we had noticed during the day. His chin was cocked upward and his eyes were fixed in a dreadful, rigid stare at the corner of the ceiling. Round his brow he had a peculiar yellow band, with brownish speckles, which seemed to be bound tightly round his head. As we entered he made neither sound nor motion.

"The band! the speckled band!" whispered Holmes.

I took a step forward. In an instant his strange headgear began to move, and there reared itself from among his hair the squat diamond-shaped head and puffed neck of a loathsome serpent.

"It is a swamp adder!" cried Holmes; "the deadliest snake in India. He has died within ten seconds of being bitten. Violence does, in truth, recoil upon the violent, and the schemer falls into the pit which he digs for another. Let us thrust this creature back into its den, and we can then remove Miss Stoner to some place of shelter and let the county police know what has happened." As he spoke he drew the dog-whip swiftly from the dead man's lap, and throwing the noose round the reptile's neck he drew it from its horrid perch and, carrying it at arm's length, threw it into the iron safe, which he closed upon it. Such are the true facts of the death of Dr. Grimesby Roylott, of Stoke Moran. It is not necessary that I should prolong a narrative which has already run to too great a length by telling how we broke the sad news to the terrified girl, how we conveyed her by the morning train to the care of her good aunt at Harrow, of how the slow process of official inquiry came to the conclusion that the doctor met his fate while indiscreetly playing with a dangerous pet. The little which I had yet to learn of the case was told me by Sherlock Holmes as we travelled back next day.

"I had," said he, "come to an entirely erroneous conclusion which shows, my dear Watson, how dangerous it always is to reason from insufficient data. The presence of the gypsies, and the use of the word 'band,' which was used by the poor girl, no doubt to explain the appearance which she had caught a hurried glimpse of by the light of her match, were sufficient to put me upon an entirely wrong scent. I can only claim the merit that I instantly reconsidered my position when, however, it became clear to me that whatever danger threatened an occupant of the room could not come either from the window or the door. My attention was speedily drawn, as I have already remarked to you, to this ventilator, and to the bell-rope which hung down to the bed. The discovery that this was a dummy, and that the bed was clamped to the floor, instantly gave rise to the suspicion that the rope was there as a bridge for something passing through the hole and coming to the bed. The idea of a snake instantly occurred to me, and when I coupled it with my knowledge that the doctor was furnished with a supply of creatures from India, I felt that I was probably on the right track. The idea of using a form of poison which could not possibly be discovered by any chemical test was just such a one as would occur to a clever and ruthless man who had had an Eastern training. The rapidity with which such a poison would take effect would also, from his point of view, be an advantage. It would be a sharp-eyed coroner, indeed, who could distinguish the two little dark punctures which would show where the poison fangs had done their work. Then I thought of the whistle. Of course he must recall the snake before the morning light revealed it to the victim. He had trained it, probably by the use of the milk which we saw, to return to him when summoned. He would put it through this ventilator at the hour that he thought best, with the certainty that it would crawl down the rope and land on the bed. It might or might not bite the occupant, perhaps she might escape every night for a week, but sooner or later she must fall a victim.

"I had come to these conclusions before ever I had entered his room. An inspection of his chair showed me that he had been in the habit of standing on it, which of course would be necessary in order that he should reach the ventilator. The sight of the safe, the saucer of milk, and the loop of whipcord were enough to finally dispel any doubts which may have remained. The metallic clang heard by Miss Stoner was obviously caused by her stepfather hastily closing the door of his safe upon its terrible occupant. Having once made up my mind, you know the steps which I took in order to put the matter to the proof. I heard the creature hiss as I have no doubt that you did also, and I instantly lit the light and attacked it."

"With the result of driving it through the ventilator."

"And also with the result of causing it to turn upon its master at the other side. Some of the blows of my cane came home and roused its snakish temper, so that it flew upon the first person it saw. In this way I am no doubt indirectly responsible for Dr. Grimesby Roylott's death, and I cannot say that it is likely to weigh very heavily upon my conscience."



 

Sherlock Holmes und das gesprenkelte Band
von Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930)       

Wenn ich über die Notizen schaue, die ich von den ungefähr siebzig Fällen in den letzten acht Jahren gemacht habe, während ich die Methoden meines Freundes Sherlock Holmes studierte, finde ich viele tragische, manche komische und viele ziemliche merkwürdige, aber niemals langweilige; da er eher aus Leidenschaft zu seiner Kunst als für das Erreichen von Wohlstand arbeitete, lehnte er es immer ab, sich mit Untersuchungen zu beschäftigen, die nicht zum ungewöhnlichen oder gar fantastischen tendierte. Von allen diesen Fällen jedoch, kann ich mich an keinen erinnern, der so besondere Charakteristika hatte als der, der mit der bekannte Surrey-Familie verbundene von Roylotts von Stoke Moran. Die betreffenden Vorkommnisse ereigneten sich in den frühen Tagen meiner Zusammenarbeit mit Holmes,  als wir als Junggesellen uns eine Unterkunft in der Baker Street teilten. Es mag sein, dass ich sie bereits vorher aufgenommen habe, aber ein Versprechen der Geheimhaltung wurde damals gemacht, von dem ich erst im letzten Monat befreit wurde durch den frühen Tod der Dame, der ich damals mein Versprechen gegeben habe. Es ist vielleicht gut, dass die Tatsachen jetzt ans Licht kommen, da ich weiß, dass es Gerüchte um den Tod von Dr. Grimesby Roylott gibt, die eher noch schrecklicher sind als die Wahrheit.

Es war Anfang April im Jahre ´83 als ich eines Morgens aufwachte und Sherlock Holmes bereits vollständig angezogen neben meinem Bett stehend vorfand. Er war ein echter Spätaufsteher, und als die Uhr auf dem Kaminsims nur viertel nach sieben zeigte, blinzelte ich ihn verwundert und möglicherweise leicht feindselig an, denn ich hatte so meine Gewohnheiten.

“Tut mir sehr Leid, Sie zu wecken, Watson”, sagte er, “aber es ist das Übliche heute morgen. Mrs. Hudson wurde geweckt, sie berichtete mir und ich Ihnen.“

“Was ist es denn? Ein Feuer?”

“Nein, ein Klient. Es scheint, dass eine junge Dame angekommen ist, die ziemlich aufgeregt zu sein scheint und darrauf besteht, mich zu sehen. Sie wartet jetzt im Wohnzimmer. Nun, wenn junge Damen um diese Zeit in der Metropole herumlaufen und schlafende Leute wecken, dann gehe ich davon aus, dass sie etwas wichtiges zu sagen haben. Sollte es sich als interessanter Fall herausstellen, würden Sie sicherlich, von Anfang an dabei sein. Ich dachte, ich sollten Ihnen in jedem Falle die Möglichkeit dazu geben und sie dazu rufen.

“Mein lieber Freund, ich würde es für nichts missen wollen.”

Ich hatte kein grandezzares Vergnügen als Holmes in seinen professionellen Untersuchungen zu folgen, und ihn in seinen schnellen Schlussfolgerungen und Intuition zu bewundern, und doch waren sie immer auf Logik basieren, mit denen er die Probleme löste, die an ihn herangetragen wurden. Ich warf schnell meine Kleidung über und war in wenigen Minuten fertig, meinen Freund ins Wohnzimmer zu begleiten. Eine Dame, in schwarz gekleidet und schwer verschleiert, die am Fenster gesessen hatte, stand auf, als wir hereinkamen.

“Guten Morgen, Madame”, sagte Holmes fröhlich. „Mein Name ist Sherlock Holmes. Dies ist mein guter Freund und Partner, Dr. Watson, vor dem Sie genauso frei sprechen können wie mit mir selbst. Ha! Ich bin froh zu sehen, dass Mrs. Hudson den guten Einfall hatte, das Feuer anzufachen. Bitte setzen Sie sich näher dorthin, und ich werde Ihnen eine Tasse Kaffee bestellen, da ich sehe, dass Sie zittern.

“Es ist nicht die Kälte, die mich zittern lässt”, sagte die Frau mit leiser Stimme, während sie sich umsetzte.

“Was dann?”

“Es ist Angst, Mr. Holmes. Es ist furchtbare Angst.“ Sie hob ihren Schleier, während sie sprach, und wir konnten sehen, dass sie wirklich in einem bemitleidenswerten Zustand von Aufregung stand, ihr Gesicht verzerrt und grau, mit ruhelosen, verängstigten Augen, wie die eines gejagten Tieres. Ihre Züge und Figur waren die einer Frau um die dreissig, aber ihre Haare waren durchsetzt mit frühem Grau, und Ihr Ausdruck war müde und sorgenvoll.

“Sie dürfen sich nicht fürchte,” sagte er beruhigend, während er sich vorbeugte und ihren Arm tätschelte. „Bald werden wir die Dinge zurecht setzen, da habe ich keinen Zweifel. Sie sind mit dem Zug heute morgen gekommen, habe ich gesehen.“

“Sie kennen mich also?”

“Nein, aber ich sehe die zweite Hälfte eines Fahrscheins in der Handfläche Ihres linken Handschuhs. Sie müssen wohl früh losgefahren sein, und außerdem hatten sie einen ziemlichen Weg in einer Hundekutsche auf holprigen Straßen, bevor Sie die Bahnstation erreichten.“

Die Dame erschrak sehr und starrte verwirrt meinen Gefährten an.

“Es gibt nichts Geheimnisvolles, meine liebe Madame,” sagte er lächelnd. „Der linke Arm Ihrer Jacke ist beschmutzt an nicht weniger als sieben Stellen. Die Stellen sind sehr frisch. Es gibt kein Gefährt außer einer Hundekutsche, das so den Schmutz aufwirft, und dann auch nur, wenn Sie auf der linken pagina des Fahrers sitzen.“

“Was auch immer Ihre Gründe sind, Sie haben absolute Recht,” sagte sie. „Ich bin heute morgen vor sechs von zu Hause losgefahren, erreichte Leatherhad um zwanzig nach, und kam mit dem ersten Zug nach Waterloo. Sir, ich kann diese Anstrengung nicht länger ertragen, ich werde verrückt, wenn es noch weitergeht. Ich habe niemanden, an den ich mich wenden kann – niemanden, außer einem, der sich um mich kümmert, und der Ärmste kann mir wenig helfen. Ich habe von Ihnen gehört, Mr. Holmes; Ich habe von Ihnen durch Mrs. Farintosh gehört, der Sie in einer Stunde ihre großen Not geholfen haben. Von ihr auch habe ich Ihre Adresse. Oh, Sir, glauben Sie, dass Sie mir auch helfen können, und wenigstens ein wenig Licht in die dichte Dunkelheit werfen können, die mich umgibt? Im Moment bin ich nicht in der Lage, Sie für Ihre Dienste zu entlohnen, aber in einem Monat oder sechs Wochen werde ich verheiratet sein und über mein eigenes Vermögen verfügen können, und dann sollen Sie mich nicht undankbar finden.“

Holmes drehte sich zu seinem Schreibtisch um, schloss ihn auf und holte ein kleines Buch heraus, in dem er las.

“Farintosh,” sagte er. “Ah, ja, ich erinnere mich an den Fall; es ging um eine Tiara aus Opal. Ich denke, das war vor Ihrer Zeit, Watson. Ich kann nur sagen, Madame, dass ich die selbe Sorgfalt auf Ihren Fall anwenden werde wie auf den Ihrer Freundin. Was das Honorar angeht, mein Beruf ist sein eigener Lohn; aber es steht Ihnen frei, die Kosten zu übernehmen, die ich haben werde, zu dem Zeitpunkt, der Ihnen am besten passt. Und nun bitte ich Sie, uns alles zu erzählen, das uns helfen kann, uns eine Meinung zu dem Tatbestand zu bilden.

“Also!” antwortete unsere Besucherin, “das Schlimmste an meiner Situation ist die Tatsache, dass meine Furcht so vage ist, und meine Verdächtigungen sich auf so kleine Dinge stützen, die jemand anderem trivial erscheinen mögen, so sehr, dass sogar derjenige, bei dem ich vor allen anderen Hilfe und Rat suchen kann, diese Dinge als die Fantasien einer nervösen Frau ansieht. Er sagt es nicht, aber ich kann es in seinen beruhigenden Antworten und verdrehten Augen lesen. Aber ich habe gehört, Mr. Holmes, dass Sie tief in die verschiedenartige Bosheit menschlicher Herzen schauen können. Sie können mir raten, wir ich mich inmitten der Gefahren bewegen kann, die mich umgeben.

“Sie haben meine ganze Aufmerksamkeit, Madame.”

“Mein Name ist Helen Stoner, und ich lebe mit meinem Stiefvater, der der letzte Überlebende einer der ältesten sächsischen Familien in Englands, den Roylotts von Stoke Moran, an der westlichen Grenze von Surrey.“

Holmes nickte mit dem Kopf. „Die Familie ist mir bekannt,“ sagte er.

“Die Familie war einmal eine der reichsten in England, und die Ländereien erstreckten sich über die Grenzen nach Berkshire im Norden und Hamshire im Westen. Im letzten Jahrhundert jedoch, waren vier aufeinander folgende Erben ausschweifend und verschwenderisch, und die Familie war irgendwann komplett ruiniert von einem Spieler währen der Regency-Zeit. Nichts war mehr übrig außer einiger weniger Hektar Land und das zweihundert Jahre alte Haus, das von einer schweren Hypothek erdrückt wird. Der letzte Gutsherr hat sein Leben dort als adliger Bettler verbracht; aber sein einziger Sohn, mein Stiefvater sah ein, dass er sich den neuen Bedingungen anpassen muss, hat einen Vorschuss eines Verwandten erhalten, welcher es ihm ermöglichte ein Abschluss in Medizin zu machen und nach Kalkutta zu gehen, wo er durch sein berufliches Können und seinen Willen eine große Praxis eröffnete. In einem Wutanfall jedoch, der durch Einbrecher in seinem Haus hervorgerufen wurde, hat er seinen eingeborenen Butler erschlagen, und er entkam nur knapp der Todesstrafe. So kam es, dass er lange Zeit ins Gefängnis musste und danach nach England als mürrischer und enttäuschter Mann zurückkehrte.

“Als Dr. Roylott in Indien war, heiratete er meine Mutter, Mrs. Stoner, die junge Witwe von Generalmajor Stoner der Bengalischen Artillerie. Meine Schwester Julia und ich waren Zwillinge und erst zwei Jahre alt zum Zeitpunkt der erneuten Heirat meiner Mutter. Sie hatte einen beträchtlichen Betrag an Geld – nicht weniger als 1000 Pfund im Jahr – und das vererbte sie ihm während wir mit ihm lebten, mit der Bedingung, das eine jährliche Summe an uns übergeht, wenn wir heirateten. Kurz nach unserer Rückkehr nach England starb meine Mutter – sie wurde bei einem Eisenbahnunfall nahe Crewe getötet. Dr. Roylott gab dann seinen Versuch auf, in London wieder eine Praxis zu eröffnen und nahm uns mit, mit ihm in dem alten Haus von Stoke Moran zu leben. Das Geld, das meine Mutter uns hinterlassen hatte, war genug für unsere Bedürfnisse, und es schien, dass es keine Hindernisse für unser Glück gab.

“Aber eine schreckliche Veränderung kam über unseren Stiefvater. Anstatt Freunde zu machen und Besuche bei unseren Nachbarn auszutauschen, die zu Anfang überglücklich waren, dass ein Roylott von Stoke Moran wieder den Familiensitz übernommen hatte, schloss er sich selbst in seinem Haus ein und kam selten heraus, außer um heftige Streits mit jedem einzugehen, der seinen Weg kreuzte. Ein gewalttätiges Temperament bis hin zum Wahnsinn ist ein Erbe bei den Männern der Familie, und im Falle meines Stiefvaters war es – so glaube ich – intensiviert durch den langen Aufenthalt in den Tropen. Eine Reihe von beschämenden Krakelereien fanden statt, von denen zwei auf der Polizeiwache endeten, bis er endlich der Schrecken des Dorfes wurde, und die Leute bei seinem Anblick flohen, da er ein Mann von enormer Stärke ist, und absolut unkontrollierbar in seiner Wut.

“Letzte Woche schleuderte er den Schmied über ein Geländer in den Fluss, und nur dadurch, dass ich alles Geld gab, das ich zusammenbekommen konnte, wurde ein weiterer öffentlicher Skandal verhindert. Er hatte keine Freunde außer den wandernden Zigeunern; er ließ sie auf dem überwachsenen Land des Familienbesitzes hausen und im Gegenzug akzeptierte er die Gastfreundschaft in ihren Zelten, und manchmal ging er mit ihnen über das Wochenende weg. Er hat ebenso eine Leidenschaft für indische Tiere, die von einem Brieffreund herübergesandt werden, im Moment wandern ein Gepard und ein Pavian über unsere Länderein, die von den Dorfbewohnern fast genauso sehr gefürchtet werden wie ihr Herr.

“Sie können sich aus meiner Erzählung vorstellen, dass meine arme Schwester Julia und ich nicht viel Freude hatte in unserem Leben. Kein Bediensteter blieb bei uns, und für eine lange Zeit mussten wir alle Arbeit im Haus machen. Sie war gerade dreißig als sie starb, und ihr Haar hatte bereits begonnen, weiß zu werden, ebenso wie meines.“

“Ihre Schwester ist also tot?”

“Sie starb gerade vor zwei Jahren, und über ihren Tod möchte ich mit Ihnen sprechen. Sie können verstehen, dass wir durch das Leben, das wir führten, wenig so lebten, wie sonst jemand unseres Alters oder in unserer Position. Allerdings hatten wir eine Tante, die jüngere Schwester meiner Mutter, Miss Honoria Westphail, die nahe Harrow lebt, und die wir erlaubt waren, manchmal kurz zu besuchen. Julie reiste dorthin an Weihnachten vor zwei Jahren und traf dort einen Halbsold-Major der Marine, mit dem sie sich verlobte. Mein Stiefvater hörte von der Verlobung als meine Schwester zurück kam und hatte keine Einwände gegen die Hochzeit; aber innerhalb von zwei Wochen vor dem Hochzeitstermin, trat das schreckliche Ereignis ein, das mich meiner einzigen Gefährtin beraubte.“

Sherlock Holmes hatte sich in seinem Sessel zurück gelehnt, die Augen geschlossen und den Kopf in ein Kissen sinken lassen, aber nun öffnete er halb seine Lider und blickte herüber zu seiner Besucherin.

“Bitte seien Sie genau bei den Details,” sagte er.

“Es ist leicht für mich, da alles jener schrecklichen Zeit in mein Gedächtnis gebrannt ist. Das Gutshaus ist, wie ich bereits gesagt habe, sehr alt und nur ein Flügel ist derzeit bewohnt. Die Schlafzimmer in diesem Flügel sind im Erdgeschoss, das Wohnzimmer ist im zentralen Bereich  der Gebäude. Von diesen Schlafzimmern gehört das erst Dr. Roylott, das zweite meiner Schwester und das dritte ist meines. Es gibt keine Verbindung dazwischen, aber alle haben Türen zum selben Korridor. Mache ich mich verständlich?“

“Absolut, ja.”

“Die Fenster der drei Räume gehen zum Garten hinaus. In dieser verhängnisvollen Nacht war Dr. Roylott früh in sein Zimmer gegangen, obwohl wir wussten, dass er sich noch nicht zur Ruhe gelegt hatte, da meine Schwester durch den Geruch von starken indischen Zigarren gestört wurde, die er gewohnt war zu rauchen. Sie verließ deshalb ihr Zimmer und in meines, wo sie für einige Zeit saß und über ihre nahende Hochzeit sprach. Um elf Uhr stand sie auf, um mich zu verlassen und sah zurück.

´”’Sag mir, Helen,’” sagte sie, “’hast du jemals jemanden mitten in der Nacht pfeifen gehört?’”

“’Niemals’, sagte ich.

“’Ich vermute, dass du möglicherweise selbst im Schlaf pfeifen könntest?

“’Sicher nicht. Aber warum?

“’Weil ich während der letzten Nächte immer so gegen drei Uhr morgens ein leises klaren Pfeifen gehört habe. Ich habe einen leichten Schlaf und es weckte mich. Ich kann nicht sagen, wo es herkam, vielleicht vom Zimmer nebenan, vielleicht vom Garten. Ich dachte, ich frage dich, ob du es möglicherweise gehört hast.’

“’Nein, habe ich nicht. Es muss wohl einer der erbärmlichen Zigeuner in der Plantage sein’.

" 'Vermutlich. Und doch, wenn es im Garten war, wundere ich mich, dass du es nicht auch gehört hast.’

“’Ah, aber ich schlafe tiefer als du.’

“’Nun, es hat ohnehin keine besonderen Auswirkungen’, sie lächelte mich an, schloss die Tür und wenige Augenblicke später hörte ich ihren Schlüssel im Schloss drehen.’

“Wirklich,” sagte Holmes. “War es immer üblich, dass Sie sich nachts einschlossen?“

“Immer.”

“Und warum?”

“Ich denke, ich erwähnte, dass der Doktor einen Gepardn und einen Pavian hielt. Wir fühlten uns nicht sicher, wenn die Türen nicht abgeschlossen waren.

“Sicher. Bitte fahren Sie mit Ihrer Aussage fort.“

“Ich sollte in dieser Nacht nicht schlafen. Ein vages Gefühl von drohendem Unglück bedrückte mich. Meine Schwester und ich, Sie werden sich erinnern, waren Zwillinge, und Sie wissen, wie subtil die Verbindungen sind, die zwei so eng verwobene Seelen miteinander vereinigen. Es war eine unruhige Nacht. Der Winde jaulte draußen, und der Regen hieb und platschte gegen die Fenster. Plötzlich, mitten in all dem Tumult des Sturmes, brach der wilde Schrei einer entsetzten Frau los. Ich wusste, dass es die Stimme meiner Schwester war. Ich sprang von meinem Bett auf, schlang einen Schal um mich und eilte in den Korridor. Als sich meine Tür öffnete, schien mir, als ob ich ein leises Pfeifen hören würde, so wie es meine Schwester beschrieben hatte, und wenige Momente später den scheppernden Laut von massivem Metall, das umfiel. als ich den Flur herunter rannte, war die Tür meiner Schwester offen und drehte sich langsam in seinen Angeln. Ich starrte sie an von Entsetzen gepackt und wusste nicht, was mich erwartete. Im Licht der Korridorlampe sah ich meine Schwester in der Türöffnung erscheinen, Ihr Gesicht weiß vor Angst, ihre Hände suchten nach Hilfe, ihre gesamte Gestalt schwankte vor und zurück wie die eines Betrunkenen. Ich rannte zu ihre und umarmte sie, aber in diesem Moment schienen ihre Knie nachzugeben und sie fiel zu Boden. Sie wand sich wie jemand, der schreckliche Schmerzen hatte, und ihre Gliedmaßen waren fürchterlich verkrampft. Zuerst dachte ich, dass sie mich nicht erkannt hatte, aber als ich mich über sie beugte, schrie sie plötzlich auf mit einer Stimme, die ich nie vergessen werde, ‚Oh, mein Gott! Helen! Es war das Band! Das gesprenkelte Band!’ Da war noch etwas, das sie gerne gesagt hätte, und sie zeigte mit ihrem Finger in die Luft in Richtung des Zimmers des Doktors, aber ein neuer Krampf schüttelte sie und erstickte ihre Worte. Ich rannte los und rief laut nach meinem Stiefvater, und ich traf ihn, wie er in seinem Hausmantel aus seinem Zimmer eilte. Als er meine Schwester erreichte, war sie bereits bewusstlos, und obwohl er ihr Brandy in den Rachen goss und nach dem Arzt aus dem Dorf rief, waren alle Bemühungen umsonst, da sie langsam fiel und ohne ihr Bewusstsein wieder zu erlangen, starb. So war das schreckliche Ende meiner geliebten Schwester.“

“Einen Moment,” sagte Holmes, “sind Sie sicher mit dem Pfeifen und dem metallischen Geräusch? Könnten Sie es beschwören?“

“Das fragte mich auch der Leichenbeschauer währen der Untersuchung. Es ist mein starker Eindruck, dass ich es gehört habe, und trotzdem – in dem Lärm des Sturmes und dem Knarren eines alten Hauses, mag ich mich möglicherweise geirrt haben.“

“War Ihre Schwester angekleidet?”

“Nein, Sie war im Nachtgewand. In ihrer rechten Hand fand man den verkohlten Stumpf eines Streichholzes, und in ihrer linken eine Streichholzschachtel.“

“Was zeigt, dass sie ein Streichholz angezündet hatte und sich umsah, als der Alarm losging. Das ist wichtig. Und zu welchem Ergebnis ist der Leichenbeschauer gekommen?“

“Er untersuchte den Fall mit großer Sorgfalt, da Dr. Roylotts Verhalten lange schon im County berüchtigt war, aber er fand keine befriedigende Todesursache. Meine Aussage bewies, dass die Tür von innen verschlossen war, und die Fenster waren durch altmodische Fensterläden mit breiten Eisenstreben blockiert, die jeden Abend verschlossen wurde. Die Wände wurden untersucht und zeigten sich überall sehr solide, und der Fußboden wurde untersucht, mit dem selben Ergebnis. Der Schornstein ist weit, aber blockiert durch vier große Klammern. Es ist daher sicher, dass meine Schwester alleine war, als sie ihr Ende fand. Außerdem gab es keine Anzeichen von Gewalt bei ihr.

“Was ist mit Gift?”

“Der Doktor hat dies an ihr untersucht, aber ohne Erfolg.“

“Was glauben Sie, woran die unglückliche Dame dann gestorben ist?”

“Es ist mein fester Glaube, dass sie an purer Angst und nervösem Schock gestorben ist, obwohl ich mir nicht vorstellen kann, was es war, das sie so geängstigt hat.“

“Gab es Zigeuner zu dieser Zeit auf dem Plantage?”

“Ja, es gibt fast immer welche dort.”

“Aha, und was machen Sie aus der Anspielung auf ein Band – ein gesprenkeltes Band?”

“Manchmal dachte ich, dass es nur das wilde Reden im Delirium war, manchmal dass es möglicherweise auf eine Gruppe von Leuten hinwies, vielleicht auf diese Zigeuner in der Plantage. Ich weiß nicht, ob nicht die gepunkteten Tücher, die sie um ihre Köpfe tragen, sie dazu gebracht haben, dieses ungewöhnliche Adjektiv zu verwenden.“

Holmes schüttelte den Kopf wie ein Mann, der lange nicht zufrieden ist.

“Das sind sehr tiefe Wasser,” sagte er; “bitte fahren Sie mit Ihrer Erzählung fort.“

“Zwei Jahre sind vergangen seitdem, und mein Leben war bis vor kurzem noch einsamer als zuvor. Vor einem Monat, ein guter Freund, den ich seit Jahren kenne, hat mir die Ehre erwiesen, mich um meine Hand zu bitten. Sein Name ist Armitage – Percy Armitage – der zweite Sohn von Mr. Armitage, von Crane Water, nahe Reading. Mein Stiefvater hat keinen Widerstand gegen diese Verbindung gezeigt, und so wollen wir während des Frühlings heiraten. Vor zwei Tagen wurde einige Reparaturen im westlichen Flügel gestartet, und die Wand meines Zimmers wurde durchbrochen, so dass ich in das Zimmer ziehen musste, in dem meine Schwester starb, und ebenso in dem Bett schlafen musste, in dem sie schlief. Stellen Sie sich meine Erregung und meine Angst vor, als ich letzte Nacht wach lag und über ihr schreckliches Schicksal nachdanke, als ich in der Stille der Nacht das leise Pfeifen hörte, das auch ihren Tod verkündete. Ich sprang auf, zündete ein Licht an, aber es war nichts zu sehen im Zimmer. Ich war zu aufgewühlt, um wieder ins Bett zu gehen, also zog ich mich an und sobald es hell wurde, schlich ich hinunter, besorgte mir einen Hundewagen am Crown Inn, der gegenüber liegt und fuhr nach Leatherhead, von wo ich mit dem Ziel kam, Sie zu sehen und Ihren Rat einzuholen.“

“Sie haben weise gehandelt,” sagte mein Freund. „Aber haben Sie mir alles erzählt?“

“Ja, alles.”

“Miss Roylott, haben Sie nicht. Sie beschützen Ihren Stiefvater.“

“Warum, was meinen Sie?”

Als Antwort schob er die Rüschen schwarzer Spitze zur pagina , die die Hand säumte, die auf dem Knie der Besucherin lag. Fünf kleine lebhafte Punkte, die Zeichen von vier Fingern und einem Daumen waren auf ihrem Handgelenk zu sehen.

“Sie wurden grausam behandelt,” sagte Holmes.

Die Dame errötete zutiefst und verdeckte ihr verletztes Handgelenkt. „Er ist ein harter Mann,“ sagte sie, „und vielleicht kennt er seine eigene Stärke kaum.“

Dann war es lange still, während dessen Holmes sein Kinn in die Hand lehnte und ins knisternde Feuer schaute.

 

Dies ist eine sehr schwerwiegende Angelegenheit,“ sagte er schließlich. „Es gibt tausend Details, die ich benötige, bevor ich über die weitere Vorgehensweise entscheide. Trotzdem haben wir keinen Augenblick zu verlieren. Wenn ich heute noch nach Stoke Moran kommen würde, wäre es möglich, diese Räume ohne das Wissen Ihres Stiefvaters zu begutachten?“

“Wie es sich begibt, sprach er davon, heute in die Stadt zu fahren für ein besonders wichtiges Geschäft. Es ist wahrscheinlich, dass er den ganzen Tag abwesend sein wird, und dann gäbe es nichts, was sie stören würde. Wir haben heutzutage eine Haushälterin, aber sie alt und dumm, und ich könnte sie leicht aus dem Weg schaffen.“

“Excellent. Also haben Sie nichts gegen diese Reise, Watson?”

“Aber gar nicht.”

“Dann warden wir beide kommen. Was werden Sie selbst tun?“

“Es gibt ein oder zwei Dinge, die ich gerne tun würde, wo ich jetzt in der Stadt bin, aber ich werde mit dem Zwölf-Uhr-Zug zurück fahren, um auch rechtzeitig zu Ihrer Ankunft zurück zu sein.“

“So können Sie uns am frühen Nachmittag erwarten. Ich habe selbst noch einige kleinere Angelegenheiten zu klären. Werden Sie warten und mit uns frühstücken?“

“Nein, ich muss gehen. Mein Herz ist bereits erleichtert, da ich Ihnen meine Sorgen unterbreitet habe. Ich werde mich darauf freuen, Sie heute Nachmittag zu sehen.“. Sie schlug ihren dicken schwarzen Schal um ihr Gesicht und entglitt aus dem Zimmer.

“Und was denken Sie von dem ganzen, Watson?“ fragte Sherlock Holmes, während er sich in seinem Sessel zurück lehnte.

“Es scheint eine sehr dunkle und böse Angelegenheit zu sein.”

“Dunkel genug und böse genug.”

“Trotzdem, wenn die Lady Recht hat, wenn sie sagt, dass der Fußboden und die Wände dicht sind, und dass die Tür, die Fenster und der Schornstein undurchdringlich sind, dann muss ihre Schwester zweifellos allein gewesen sein, als sie ihr mysteriöses Ende fand.“

„Und was ist dann mit diesem nächtlichen Pfeifen, und was ist mit den sehr sonderbaren Worten der sterbenden Frau?“

“Ich habe keine Ahnung.”

“Wenn Sie die Idee des Pfeifens in der Nacht, die Anwesenheit einer Gruppe von Zigeunern, die sehr eng mit dem alten Doktor sind, und den Fakt, dass wir allen Grund haben anzunehmen, dass der Doktor ein Interesse daran hat, die Hochzeit seiner Stieftochter zu verhindern, verbinden mit dem Hinweis auf ein Band, und letztlich die Tatsache, dass Miss Helen Stoner einen metallischen Klang gehört hat, der möglicherweise dadurch hervorgerufen wurde, dass einer der matellenen Stäbe, der die Fensterläden sicherte, an seinen Platz zurück fiel, denke ich, dass wir gute Gründe haben zu glauben, dass sich dieses Mysterium entlang dieser Gedankenlinien lösen lässt.“
“Aber was haben dann die Zigeuner getan?”

“Ich habe keine Ahnung.”

“Ich sehe viele Einwände zu dieser Theorie.”

“Ich auch. Deshalb warden wir auch heute noch nach Stoke Moran fahren. Ich möchte sehen, ob diese Bedenken.schwerwiegend sind, oder ob sie möglicherweise erklärt warden können. Aber was in Teufels Namen!“

Der Ausbruch war meinem Gefährten entglitten durch die Tatsache, dass unsere Tür plötzlich aufgestoßen worden war und dass ein riesiger Mann sich selbst in der Öffnung zeigte. Seine Bekleidung war eine sonderbare Mischung von professionellem und ländlichem, mit einem schwarzen Zylinderhut, einem langen Frack und einem Paar hoher Gamaschen, sowie mit einer Jagdpeitsche in seiner Hand. Er war so groß, dass er den Querbalken der Tür berührte, und seine Breite schien sich von einer pagina zur anderen zu spannen. Ein großes Gesicht, bedeckt mit tausend Falten, gelb gebrannt von der Sonne und gezeichnet durch die böse Leidenschaft drehte sich von einem zum anderen von uns beiden, währen seine tiefsitzenden Augen, galle-unterlaufenen Augen, und seine hohe, dünne, fleischlose Nase gaben ihm eine gewisse Ähnlichkeit mit einem Raubvogel.

“Welcher von Ihnen ist Holmes?” fragte die Erscheinung.

“Mein Name, Sir, aber Sie haben mir gegenüber den Vorteil,” sagte mein Gefährte leise.

“Ich bin Dr. Grimesby Roylott, von Stoke Moran.”

“Wirklich, Doktor,” sagte Holmes saft. „Bitte nehmen Sie Platz.“

“Ich werde nichts dergleichen tun. Meine Stieftochter war hier. Ich habe sie verfolgt. Was hat sie Ihnen gesagt?”

“Es ist ein wenig kalt für diese Jahreszeit,” sagte Holmes.

“Was hat sie Ihnen gesagt?”, schrie der alte Mann wütend.

“Aber ich habe auch gehört, dass die Krokusse bald kommen,” fuhr mein Kamerad unbeirrt fort.

“Ha! Sie halten mich hin, nicht wahr?” sagte unser neuer Besucher, al ser einen Schritt vorwärts tat und seine Jagdpeitsche schwang. „Ich kenne Sie, Sie Schuft! Ich habe von Ihnen schon gehört. Sie sind Holmes, der Einmischer.”

Mein Freund lächelte.

“Holmes, der Wichtigtuer!”

Sein Lächeln verbreiterte sich.

“Holmes, der kleine Scotland-Yard Besserwisser!”

Homes lachte von Herzen. “Ihre Konversation ist höchst unterhaltsam.“ Sagte er. „Wann werden Sie die Tür schließen, denn es gibt einen ziemlichen Zug.“

“Ich werde gehen, wenn ich gesagt habe, was ich sagen wollte. Wagen Sie es nicht, sich in meine Angelegenheiten einzumischen. Ich weiß, dass Miss Stoner hier war. Ich bin ihr gefolgt! Ich bin ein gefährlicher Mann, wenn man sich mit mir anliegt! Sehen Sie hier.“ Er schritt schnell nach vorne, ergriff den Schürhaken, und verbog ihn mit seinen riesigen braunen Händen.

“Sehen Sie zu, dass Sie mir aus den Augen bleiben,” knurrte er, und schwang den verbogenen Schürhaken in den Kamin als er aus dem Zimmer schritt.

“Er scheint, eine sehr liebenswerte Person zu sein,” sagte Holmes lachend. „Ich bin nicht so grob wie er, aber wenn er geblieben wäre, hätte ich ihm vielleicht gezeigt, dass mein Griff nicht viel kraftloser ist als seiner.“ Als er sprach, nahm er den stählernen Schürhaken auf und , mit einer plötzlicher Anstrengung, bog er ihn wieder gerade.

“Dass er die Unverschämtheit hatte, mich mit den offiziellen Kriminalbeamten zu verwechseln! Dieser Vorfall gibt Anreiz für unsere Untersuchungen, und ich glaube, dass unser kleiner Freund wird nicht unter dem Leichtsinn leiden, dass diese Unmensche ihr weiter folgt. Und nun, Watson, sollten wir Frühstück bestellen, und danach werde ich zur Asukunftei laufen, wo ich hoffe, dass ich einige Information bekomme, die uns in dieser Sache helfen werden.

Es war fast ein Uhr, als Sherlock Holmes von seinem Ausflug zurückkehrte. Er hielt ein Blatt blauen Papiers in seinen Händen, über und über mit Notizen und Diagrammen bekritzelt.

“Ich habe das Testament der verstorbenen Frau gesehen,” sagte er. „Um die genaue Bedeutung zu bestimmen, war ich gezwungen, die aktuellen Werte der entsprechenden Investments zu bestimmen. Das gesamte Einkommen, das zum Zeitpunkt des Todes der Ehefrau etwas mehr als 1100 Pfund betrug, ist nun durch den Verfall der landwirtschaftlichen Preise auf kaum 750 Pfund gefallen. Jede Tochter hat Anspruch auf ein Einkommen von 250 Pfund, wenn sie heiratet. Es ist daher offensichtlich, dass wenn beide Mädchen geheiratet hätten, diese Schönheit nur noch einen Almosen hätte, während bereits eine von beiden ihn zu einem großen parte beschnitten hätte. Meine morgendliche Arbeit war nicht umsonst, da sie beweisen konnte, dass er die stärksten Motive hat, sich allem dieser Art in den Weg zu stellen. Und nun, Watson, das ist zu ernst, um zu trödeln, besonders da der alte Mann weiß, dass wir uns in dieser Angelegenheit bemühen, also wenn Sie fertig sind, werden wir ein Taxi bestellen und nach Waterloo fahren. Ich wäre Ihnen sehr dankbar, wenn Sie Ihren Revolver in Ihre Tasche stecken würden. ein Eley’s No. 2 ist ein exzellentes Argument mit Herren, die stählerne Schürhaken verknoten können. Das und eine Zahnbürste. Ich denke, das ist alles, was wir brauchen.

In Waterloo hatten wir das Glück einen Zug nach Leatherhead zu erwischen, wo wir eine Fahrt von Bahnhofspub bestellten und für vier oder fünf Minuten durch die wunderbaren Straßen von Surrey fuhren. Es war ein perfekter Tag, mit heller Sonne und wenigen weichen Wolken am Himmel. Die Bäume und die Hecken am Wegesrand lie0ßen gerade ihr erstes Grün sehen, und die Luft war voll vom angenehmen Duft von feuchter Erde. Wenigstens für mich war dies ein seltsamer Kontrast zwischen dem süßen Versprechen des Frühlings und dieser dunklen Suche, in die wir verwickelt waren. Mein Kamerad saß vorne im Wagen, seine Arme verschränkt, sein Hut über seine Augen gezogen, und sein Kinn auf seine Brust gesunken, vergraben in den tiefsten Gedanken. Plötzlich jedoch, tippte er mir auf die Schulter und zeigte über die Wiesen.

“Sehen Sie, dort!” sagte er.

Ein grob gezimmerter Park erstreckte sich in einem sanften Bogen, bis er sich an seinem höchsten Punkt zu einem kleinen Wäldchen verdichtete. Von der Mitte der Zweige ragten die grauen Giebel und hohen Dachbalken eines sehr alten Gutshauses hervor.

“Stoke Moran?” sagte er.

“Ja, Sir, was ware das Haus von Dr. Grimesby Roylott,“ bemerkte der Fahrer.

“Es gibt einige Bautätigkeit dort,” sagte Holmes; “dahin gehen wir.”

“Dort ist das Dorf,” sagte der Fahrer, als er auf eine Gruppe von Dächern in einiger Entfernung zur Linken zeigte, „aber wenn sie zum Haus gelangen wollen, wird es kürzer sein, über diesen Zaun hinweg zu gehen und dann über den Fußpfad über die Felder. Dort, wo die Lady gerade geht.“

“Und die Lady, denke ich, ist Miss Stoner,” bemerhte Holmes während er seine Augen bedeckte. „Ja, wir sollten besser machen, was Sie vorschlagen.“

Wir stiegen aus, zahlten unsere Fahrt, und der Wagen ratterte zurück auf seinem Weg nach Leatherhead.

“Ich dachte, es wäre gut,” sagte Holmes als wir über den Zaun stiegen, “dass der Gute glauben sollte, wir wären Architekten, oder in einem anderen Baugeschäft. Das sollte die Gerüchte stoppen. Guten Tag, Miss Stoner. Sie sehen, dass wir unser Wort halten.”

Unsere Klientin von dem Morgen hatte sich beeilt, uns entgegen zu kommen mit einem Gesicht, dass zeigte, wie sie sich freute. „Ich habe so sehr auf Sie gewartet,“ rief sie, uns voller Wärme die Hände schüttelnd. „Alles hat gut geklappt. Dr. Roylott ist in die Stadt gefahren, und es ist unwahrscheinlich, dass er vor dem Abend zurück sein wird.”

“Wir hatten das Vergnügen, die Bekanntschaft des Doktors zu machen,” Sagte Holmes, und in einigen wenigen Worten skizzierte er, was vorgefallen war. Miss Stoner wurde weiß bis zu den Lippen als sie zuhörte.

“Lieber Gott!” rief sie, “er ist mir also gefolgt.

“So scheint es.”

“Er ist so gerissen, dass ich nie weiß, wann ich vor ihm sicher bin. Was hat er gesagt, wann er zurück sein wird?“

“Er sollte sich selbst vorsehen, da er herausfinden könnte, dass es jemanden gibt, der noch gerissener ist als er. Sie müssen sich heute Abend vor ihm einschließen. Wenn er gewalttätig wird, werden wir Sie fortschaffen zu Ihrer Tante in Harrow. Nun sollten wir unsere Zeit so gut wie möglich nutzen, also bringen Sie uns bitte sofort zu den Räumen, die wir untersuchen werden.“

Das Gebäude war aus grauem, flechtenfleckigem Stein mit einem hohen zentralen parte und zwei sich krümmenden Flügeln, wie Klauen einer Krabbe, an jede pagina geworfen. In einem dieser Flügel waren die Fenster zerbrochen und mit Holzbrettern versperrt, während das Dach teilweise eingefallen war, ein Bild einer Ruine. Der mittlere parte war ein bisschen besser erhalten, aber die rechte pagina war vergleichsweise modern, und die Fensterläden mit dem blauen Rauch aus den Schornsteinen zeigte, dass hier die Familie residierte. Einige Gerüste waren gegen die Wand errichtet worden, aber es gab kein Zeichen von irgendwelchen Arbeitern als wir ankamen. Holmes ging langsam auf und ab auf dem schlecht gepflegten Rasen und untersuchte mit großer Aufmerksamkeit die Außenseiten der Fenster.

“Das hier, denke ich, gehört zu dem Zimmer, in dem Sie vorher schliefen, das mittlere ist das Ihrer Schwester und das nahe des Hauptgebäudes ist das von Dr. Roylott’s.

“Genau so. Aber jetzt schlafe ich in dem mittleren.”

“Wegen der Veränderungen, wie ich verstehe. Übrigens, es scheint, dass an dieser pagina der Wand keine besondere Notwendigkeit für Reparaturen besteht.“

“Es gab keine. Ich denke, dass dies der Grund war, mich aus meinem Zimmer zu bringen.”

“Ah! Das ist eine Andeutung. Nun, auf der anderen pagina dieses schmalen Flügels verläuft der Korridor, zu dem diese drei Zimmer sich öffnen. Dort sind Fenster drin, natürlich?“ „Ja, aber sehr schmale, zu schmal, als dass jemand hindurch gelangen könnte.“

“Da Sie beide Ihre Türen über Nacht abschließen, waren Ihre Zimmer von dieser pagina auch unzugänglich. Nun, hätten Sie die Freundlichkeit, in Ihr Zimmer zu gehen und die Fensterläden zu schließen?“

Miss Stoner tat dies, und Homes, nach einer genauer Untersuchung durch das offene Fenster, bemühte sich in jeglicher Hinsicht, die Fensterläden zu öffnen, aber ohne Erfolg. Es gab keinen Schlitz durch den ein Messer gelangen könnte, um den Riegel anzuheben. Dann prüfte er mit seiner Linse die Angeln, aber diese waren aus solidem Eisen, fest in das Gemäuer eingebaut. „Hum!“ sagte er, während er sich das Kinn kratze in einiger Verwunderung, “meine Theorie zeigt sicher einige Schwierigkeiten. Niemand konnte diese Fensterläden überwinden, wenn sie verschlossen waren. Nun, wir werden sehen, ob von innen etwas Licht in die Sache gebracht werden kann.“

Eine schmale pagina ntüre führte in den weiß-getünchten Korridor, von wo die drei Schlafzimmer abgingen. Holmes wollte das dritte Zimmer nicht untersuchen, so gingen wir sofort zum zweiten, jenes, in dem Miss Stoner jetzt sclief, und in welchem ihre Schwester ihr Schicksal traf. Es war ein gemütliches, kleines Zimmer, mit niedriger Decke und großem Kamin, in der Mode von alten Landhäusern. Ein brauner Schreibtisch stand in einer Ecke, ein schmales Bett mit weißem Überwurf in der anderen und einer Frisierkommode auf der linken pagina des Fensters. Diese Dinge, mit zwei kleinen Korbstühlen, machten das gesamte Mobiliar in dem Raum aus zusätzlich zu einem Quadrat Wilton-Teppich in der Mitte. Diese Dinge, zusammen mit zwei kleinen Korbstühlen machten das gesamte Mobiliar aus abgesehen von einem Quadrat eines Wilton Teppichs in der Mitte. Die Dielen und Paneele der Wände waren aus brauner, wurmzerfressener Eiche, so alt und entfärbt, dass es aus der Zeit stammen könnte, als das Haus gebaut wurde. Holmes zog einen der Stühle in eine Ecke und saß still, währen seine Augen durch den Raum wanderten – rundherum und hoch und runter, so dass er jedes Detail wahrnahm.

“Wofür ist die Glocke?” fragte er schließlich und zeigte auf ein dickes Glockenseil, das neben dem Bett hing, die Quaste auf dem Kopfkissen liegend.

“Es geht zum Hausmädchen-Zimmer.”

“Es sieht neuer aus als die anderen Dinge?”

“Ja, es wurde erst vor ein paar Jahren dort angebracht.”

“Ihre Schwester hatte darum gebeten, nehme ich an?”

“Nein, ich habe nie gehört, dass sie es benutzt hätte. Wir haben uns immer das, was wir wollten, selbst geholt.“

“Tatsächlich scheint es unnötig ein so hübsches Glockenseil dort anzubringen. Bitte entschuldigen Sie mich für ein paar Minuten, während ich mich auf dem Boden umsehe.“ Er warf sich mit seiner Lupe auf den Boden und kroch leicht vor uns zurück, untersuchte sehr genau die Risse zwischen den Dielenbrettern. Dann tat er dasselbe mit der Holzarbeit, mit der das Zimmer paneelt war. Schließlich ging er hinüber zum Bett und verbrachte einige Zeit damit, es anzustarren und die Wand auf und ab zu untersuchen. Endlich nahm er das Glockenseil in die Hand und zog einmal kräftig daran.

“Oh, es ist eine Attrappe,” sagte er.

“Klingelt es nicht?”

“Nein, es ist nicht einmal an einen Draht angeschlossen. Das ist sehr interessant. Sie können hier sehen, dass es an einem Haken befestigt ist, der dort gerade bei der kleinen Öffnung für den Ventilator angebracht ist.

“Wie absurd! Ich habe das vorher nie festgestellt.”

“Sehr seltsam!” murmelte Holmes, während er an dem Seil zog. „Es gibt ein oder zwei sehr merkwürdige Dinge in diesem Zimmer. Zum Beispiel, welcher närrische Baumeister baut einen Ventilator ein, der in ein andere Zimmer geht, wenn er ihn mit demselben Aufwand auch hätte nach außen legen können.

“Der ist auch ziemlich modern,” sagte die Dame.

“Zum gleichen Zeitpunkt wie das Glockenseil angebracht?” bemerkte Holmes.

“Ja, es gab damals einige kleine Änderungen, die damals ausgeführt wurden.”

“Sie sind von höchst interessantem Charakter – Attrappen-Glockenseile und Ventilatoren, die nicht ventilieren. Mit Ihrer Erlaubnis, Miss Stoner, werden wir nun unsere Untersuchungen im inneren Apartment fortsetzen.“

Dr. Grimesby Roylott’s zimmer war grandezzar als das seiner Stieftochter, aber genauso einfach eingerichtet. Ein Einzelbett, ein kleines hölzernes Regal voller Bücher, meistens von technischem Charakter, ein Sessel neben dem Bett, ein einfacher Holzstuhl an der Wand, ein runder Tisch, und ein großer eiserner Safe waren die hauptsächlichen Dinge, die seine Augen erfassten. Holms ging langsam herum und untersuchte jedes einzelne davon mit dem größten Interesse.

“Was ist hier drin?” fragte er, während er an den Safe klopfte.

“Die Geschäftspapiere meines Stiefvaters.”

“Oh! Sie haben hineingeschaut?”

“Nur einmal, vor einigen Jahren. Ich erinnere mich, dass es voller Papiere war.“

“Es gibt keine Katze darin, zum Beispiel?”

“Nein, was für eine seltsame Idee!”

“Nun, schauen Sie hier!” Er nahm eine schmale Untertasse mit Milch, die darauf stand.

“Nein; wir halten keine Katze. Aber es gibt den Gepard und den Pavian.“

„Ah, ja, natürlich! Nun, ein Gepard ist nur eine große Katze, und trotzdem kommt man mit einer Untertasse nicht weit bei seinen Bedürfnissen, würde ich sagen. Es gibt einen Punkt, den ich gerne feststellen möchte.“ Er bückte sich nieder vor dem Holzstuhl und untersuchte den Sitz mit der größten Aufmerksamkeit.

“Danke. Das ist dann klar,” sagte er, al ser aufstand und seine Lupe in die Tasche steckte. “Hallo! Hier ist etwas interessantes!”

Das Objekt, das sein Auge gefangen hielt, war eine kleine Hundeleine, die an einer pagina des Bettes hing. Die Leine war um sich selbst gewickelt, so dass sie den Bogen einer Peitsche ausmachte.

“Was machen Sie aus dieser Geschichte, Watson?”

“Es ist eine ganz gewöhnliche Leine. Aber ich weiß nicht, warum sie verknotet sein sollte.“

“Das ist nicht ganz so gewöhnlich, nicht war? Ah! Es ist eine böse Welt, und wenn ein kluger Mann sein Gehirn dem Kriminellen zuwendet, ist es das Schlimmste. Ich denke, wir haben genug gesehen, Miss Stoner, und mit Ihrer Erlaubnis werden wir in den Garten gehen.“

Ich hatte das Gesicht meines Freundes noch nie so ernst gesehen und seine Brauen so dunkel als zu dem Zeitpunkt als wir uns von dieser Szene unserer Untersuchung abwanden. Wir waren einige Male den Rasen hoch und runter geschritten, weder Miss Stoner noch ich selbst wollten ihn in seinen Gedanken unterbrechen, bevor er selbst von seiner Grübelei aufsah.

“Es ist essentiell, Miss Stoner,” sagte er, “dass sie absolut meinem Rat folgen in jeder Hinsicht.”

“Ich werde es ganz sicher tun.”

“Die Sache ist zu ernst für jedwedes Zögern. Ihr Leben könnte von Ihrem Befolgen abhängen.“

„Ich versichere Ihnen, dass ich mich ganz in Ihre Hände begebe.“

“Zunächst, wir beide, mein Freund und ich, müssen die Nacht in Ihrem Zimmer verbringen.”

Sowohl Miss Stoner als auch ich blickten ihn erstaunt an.

“Ja, das muss so sein. Lassen Sie mich erklären. Ich denke, da drüben ist das Dorf-Gasthaus?”

“Ja, das ist die Krone.”

“Sehr gut. Ihre Fenster sind von dort aus zu sehen?”

“Sicher.”

“Sie müssen sich in Ihr Zimmer einschließen unter dem Vorwand von Kopfschmerzen, wenn Ihr Stiefvater wiederkommt. Dann, wenn Sie hören, dass er sich zur Nachtruhe begibt, öffnen Sie Ihre Fensterläden, und öffnen die Haspe, stellen eine Lampe als Signal für uns dorthin, und dann gehen Sie leise mit allen Dingen, die Sie brauchen, in Ihr altes Zimmer. Ich habe keinen Zweifel, dass trotz der Reparaturen es möglich sein wird, eine Nacht dort zu verbringen.

“Oh, ja, leicht.”

“Den Rest belassen Sie in unseren Händen.”

“Aber, was warden Sie tun?”

“Wir warden die Nacht in Ihrem Zimmer verbringen und wir warden den Grund für das Geräusch, das Sie stört, herausfinden.“

“Ich glaube, Mr. Holmes, dass Sie sich bereits entschieden habe,” sagte Miss Stoner, und legte ihre Hand auf den Ärmel meines Gefährten.

“Vielleicht habe ich das.”

“Dann, ich bitte Sie, sagen Sie mir, was die Ursache für den Tod meiner Schwester.“

“Ich ziehe es vor, klarere Beweise zu haben, bevor ich davon spreche.”

“Sie können mir wenigstens sagen, ob meine eigenen Gedanken stimmen, und ob sie an einem plötzlichen Schrecken gestorben ist.“

“Nein, ich denke nicht. Ich denke, dass es einen konkreteren Grund dafür gab. Und nun, Miss Stoner, müssen wir Sie verlassen, denn wenn Dr. Roylott zurückkehrte und uns sähe, wäre unsere Reise umsonst gewesen. Auf Wiedersehen, und seien Sie mutig, denn wenn Sie tun, was ich Ihnen gesagt habe, können Sie sicher sein, dass wir bald alle Gefahren vertrieben haben werden, die Sie bedrohen.

Sherlock Holmes und ich hatten keine Schwierigkeiten ein Schlafzimmer und ein Wohnzimmer im Königs-Inn zu erhalten. Sie waren im oberen Geschoss, und von unserem Fenster konnten wir das Tor und den bewohnten parte von Stoke Moran Manor Hause schauen. Zur Dämmerung sahen wir Dr. Grimesby Roylott vorbei fahren, seine riesige Statur überschattete den Jungen, der ihn fuhr. Der Junge hatte einige Schwierigkeiten, die schweren eisernen Tore zu öffnen, und wir hörten das heisere Gebrüll der Stimme des Doktors und wie er wütend mit der Faust schüttelte. Die Kutsche fuhr weiter und einige Minuten später sahen wir plötzlich ein Licht angehen in einem der Wohnzimmer.

“Wissen Sie, Watson,” sagte Holmes, als wir zusammen in der dichter werdenden Dunkelheit saßen, “Ich habe wirklich Skrupel, Sie heute Abend mitzunehmen. Es gibt ein bestimmtes Element an Gefahr.“

“Kann ich helfen?”

“Ihre Anwesenheit könnte unschätzbar sein.”

“Dann werde ich selbstverständlich mitkommen.”

“Das ist sehr liebenswürdig von Ihnen.”

“Sie sprechen von Gefahr. Sie haben offensichtlich mehr in diesen Zimmern gesehen als ich.”

“Nein, aber ich stelle mir vor, dass ich ein wenig mehr abgeleitet habe. Ich glaube, Sie haben all das gesehen, was ich gesehen habe.“

“Ich sah nichts besonderes außer des Glockenseils, und welchen Sinn es haben könnte, muss ich zugeben, dass ich es mir nicht vorstellen kann.“

“Sahen Sie auch den Ventilator?”

“Ja, aber ich denke nicht, dass es so ungewöhnlich ist, eine so kleine Öffnung zwischen zwei Räumen zu haben. Es war so klein, dass kaum eine Ratte hindurch gelangen könnte.“

“Ich wusste, dass wir einen Ventilator finden würde, bevor wir überhaupt nach Stoke Moran kamen.”

“Mein lieber Holmes!”

“Oh, ja, so war es. Erinnern Sie sich, in ihrer Aussage, sagte sie, dass ihre Schwester die Zigarren von Dr. Roylott riechen konnte. Nun, das besagt, dass es eine Verbindung zwischen den beiden Zimmern geben muss. Es kann nur eine kleine sein, sonst hätte der Leichenbeschauer es bemerkt. Ich habe gefolgert: ein Ventilator.“

“Aber was ist daran schlimm?”

“Nun, es gibt zumindest einen merkwürdigen Zufall der Daten. Ein Ventilator wurde eingebaut, ein Seil wurde angehangen und die Dame, die in dem Bett liegt, stirbt. Fällt Ihnen das nicht auf?“

“Ich kann trotzdem noch keine Verbindung sehen.”

“Haben Sie etwas sehr merkwürdiges an dem Bett festgestellt?”

“Nein.”

“Es war am Boden festgemacht. Haben Sie jemals ein Bett so festgehalten gesehen?“

“Ich kann nicht sagen, dass ich es hätte.”

“Die Dame konnte ihr Bett nicht bewegen. Es war immer in der gleichen Position im Verhältnis zum Ventilator und dem Seil – oder so nennen wir es einmal, da es ganz klar nie dafür gedacht war, eine Glocke zu läuten.

“Holmes,” rief ich, “es scheint, dass ich nun wage sehe, was Sie andeuten. Wir sind gerade recht gekommen, um ein raffiniertes und schreckliches Verbrechen zu verhindern.“

“Raffiniert genug und schrecklich genug. Wenn ein Arzt den falschen Weg einschläft, ist er ein guter Krimineller. Er hat Nerven und er hat Wissen. Palmer und Pritchard waren unter den Führenden ihres Berufes. Dieser Mann ist sogar noch besser, aber ich denke, Watson, dass wir in der Lage sein werden, sogar noch besser zu sein. Aber wir werden genug Schrecken erfahren, bevor die Nacht vorüber ist; Du liebe Güte, lassen Sie uns eine stille Pfeife rauchen und für ein paar Stunden an etwas Fröhlicheres denken.

* * *

Gegen neun Uhr wurde das Licht zwischen den Bäumen gelöscht, und es war sehr dunkel in Richten des Gutshauses. Zwei Stunden vergingen langsam, und dann, plötzlich, gerade als es elf schlug, ein brannte ein einzelnes Licht direkt vor uns.

“Das ist unser Signal,” sagte Holmes und sprang auf seine Füße, „es kommt vom mittleren Fenster.“

Als wir vorübergingen tauschten wire in paar Worte mit dem Wirt und erklärten ihm, dass wir einen späten Besuch bei einem Bekannten machen würden, und dass es möglich wäre, dass wir die Nacht dort verbringen würden. Einen Moment später waren wir auf der dunklen Straße, ein kalter Wind blies uns ins unsere Gesichter, und ein gelbes Licht zeigte uns unseren Weg auf unserem trüben Weg.

Es gab kaum Schwierigkeiten, auf das Gelände zu gelange, da es unreparierte Lösche in der alten Parkmauer gab. Wir machten unseren Weg durch die Bäume, erreichten das Rasenstück, überquerten es, und waren gerade dabei durch das Fenster zu steigen, als aus einem Lorbeerbusch etwas heraussprang, das aussah wie ein deformiertes Kind, das sich selbst auf das Gras war mit sich schüttelnden Gliedern und dann schnell über den Rasen in die Dunkelheit rannte.

“Mein Gott!” flüsterte ich; “haben Sie das gesehen?”
Holmes war für einen Moment so überrascht wie ich. Seine Hand umschloss mein Handgelenkt wie ein Schraubstock vor Aufregung. Dann brach er in ein leises Lachen aus und führte seine Lippen zu meinem Ohr.

“Das ist ein netter Haushalt,” murmelte er. „Das ist der Pavian.“

Ich hatte die seltsamen Haustiere vergessen, die sich der Doktor hielt. Es gab auch einen Gepard; den wir vielleicht jeden Augenblick an unserer Schulter finden werden. Ich gestehe, dass ich mich erleichtert fühlte, nachdem ich Holmes nachtat, meine Schuhe auszog und in das Schlafzimmer schlüpfte. Mein Kamerad verschloss die Fensterläden geräuschlos, stellte die Lampe auf den Tisch und ließ seine Augen durch den Raum schweifen. Alles war, wie wir es am Tage gesehen hatte. Dann schlich er sich an mich heran, machte eine Trompete aus seiner Hand und flüsterte in mein Ohr, wieder so leise, dass ich gerade so die Worte verstehen konnte.

“Das kleinste Geräusch ware fatal für unsere Pläne.”

Ich nickte, um zu zeigen, dass ich ihn gehört hatte.

“Wir müssen ohne Licht sitzen. Er würde es durch den Ventilator hindurch sehen.“

Ich nickte wieder.

“Schlafen Sie nicht ein; Ihr Leben könnte davon abhängen. Halten Sie Ihre Pistole bereit, falls wir ihn brauchen. Ich werde auf dem Bettrand, und Sie in diesem Sessel.

Ich zog meinen Revolver heraus und legte ihn auf den Rand des Tisches.

Holmes hatte einen langen dünnen Rohrstock mitgebracht, und diesen legte in aufs Bett neben ihn. Dazu legte er eine Streichholzschachten und den Stumpf einer Kerze. Dann drehte er die Lampe herunter, und wir verblieben in Dunkelheit.

Wie soll ich jemals diese schauderhafte Nachtwache vergessen? Ich konnte nicht einen Ton hören, noch nicht einmal ein Atemzug, und doch wusste ich, dass mein Kamerad nur einige Meter von mir entfernt saß mit offenen Augen und mit derselben nervösen Anspannung, die ich selbst hatte. Die Fensterläden schlossen den letzten Lichtstrahl aus, und wir warteten in absoluter Dunkelheit. Von außen kamen die gelegentlichen Schreie von Nachtvögeln, und einmal direkt vor unserem Fenster ein langgezogenes katzenartiges Jaulen, das uns sagte, dass der Gepard tatsächlich frei herumlief. Weit weg hörten wir die tiefen Töne der Gemeindeglocke, die jede viertel Stunde schlug. Wie lang diese Viertelstunden erschienen! Es schlug zwölf, und eins und zwei und drei, und doch saßen wir immer noch leise für was auch immer da noch kommen würde.

Plötzlich gab es einen kurzen Lichtschein oben aus Richtung des Ventilators, der sofort wieder verschwand, aber er wurde gefolgt von einem starken Geruch von verbrannten Öl und heißem Metall. Jemand nebenan hatte jemand eine Laterne angezündet. Ich hörte einen leisen Laut von Bewegung, und dann war es wieder komplett still, auch wenn der Geruch stärker wurde. Für eine halbe Stunde saß ich da und strengte meine Ohren an. Plötzlich wurde ein weiter Laut zu hören – ein sehr leiser, beruhigender Laut, wie der eines kleinen Dampfstroms, der gleichmäßig aus einem Kessel kam.

“Sehen Sie es, Watson?” rief er. „Sehen Sie es?“

Aber ich sah gar nichts. In dem Moment als Holmes das Licht anmachte, hörte ich eine leises, klares Pfeifen, aber durch das plötzliche Licht, das meine Augen blendete, war es mir nicht möglich zu sehen, worauf mein Freund so wild einschlug. Ich konnte jedoch sehen, dass sein Gesicht sehr bleich war und voller Horror und Abneigung. -

Er hatte aufgehört zu schlagen und blickte hinauf zum Ventilator, als plötzlich aus der Stille der Nacht der schrecklichste Schrei, den ich jemals gehört hatte, losging. Es wurde lauter und lauter, ein rauer Schrei vor lauter Schmerzen, Angst und Wut, alles verbunden in einem fürchterlichen spitzen Schrei. Man sagt, dass dieser Schrei sogar die Schlafenden im entfernten Dorf aus ihren Betten geholt hatte. Es traf uns kalt in den Herzen, und ich stand da und schaute Holmes an, und er mich, bis endlich die Echos des Schreis in die Stille verebbt waren, von wo er herkommen war.

“Was kann das bedeuten” keuchte ich.

“Es bedeutet, dass alles vorbei ist,” antwortete Holmes. „Und vielleicht sogar zum Besten. Nehmen Sie die Pistole, und wir gehen in Dr. Roylott’s Zimmer.“

“Mit ernstem Gesicht zündete er die Lampe an und führte den Weg den Korridor hinunter. Zweimal klopfte er an die Zimmertür, ohne dass von innen geantwortet wurde. Dann drückte der die Klinke und trat ein, und ich auf seinen Fersen, die Pistole bereit in meiner Hand.

Es war ein ungewöhnlicher Anblick, der sich uns bot. Auf dem Tisch stand eine Laterne mit der Klappe halb offen, die einen hellen Lichtschein auf den eisernen Safe war, dessen Tür angelehnt war. Neben dem Tisch, auf dem Holzstuhl saß Dr. Grimesby Roylott, bekleidet in einem langen, grauen Morgenmantel, aus dem seine nackten Fußgelenke hervorkamen, seine Füße in absatzlosen türkischen Schuhen. Über seinen Schoß lag der kurze Stock mit der langen Leine, die wir am Tage gesehen hatten. Sein Kinn zeigte nach oben und seine Augen waren in einem starren Blick auf die Ecke der Decke fixiert. Um seine Braue hatte er ein seltsames gelbes Band mit bräunlichen Punkten, das eng um seinen Kopf gebunden schien. Als wir eintraten, machte er weder ein Geräusch noch eine Bewegung.

“Das Band! Das gesprenkelte Band!” flüsterte Holmes.

“Er nahm einen Schritt vorwärts. In einer Sekunde begann dieser merkwürdige Kopfschmuck sich zu bewegen, und da richtete ich aus den Haaren der diamanten-geformte Kopf und der dicke Hals einer ekelhaften Schlange auf.

„Es ist eine Sumpfnatter!“ rief Holmes; „die tödlichste Schlange in Indien. Er starb innerhalb von zehn Sekunden nach dem Biss. Gewalt fällt zurück auf die Gewalttätigen, und der Intrigant fällt in die Grube, die er anderen gegraben hat. Lassen Sie diese Kreatur zurück in ihr Nest stoßen und dann bringen wir Miss Stoner in eine sichere Unterkunft und lassen die örtliche Polizei wissen, was vorgefallen ist.“ Während er sprach zog der die Hundepeitsche schnell aus dem Schoß des toten Mannes, warf die Schlinge um den Hals des Reptils und zog es von seinem schrecklichen Hochsitz und trug es weit von sich gestreckt zum Safe, wo er es hineinwarf, den er gleich darauf schloss.

Dies sind die wahren Fakten des Todes von Dr. Grimesby Roylott von Stoke Moran. Es ist nicht notwendig, dass ich die Erzählung verlängern sollte, die sich ohnehin schon zu besonderer Länge hinzog, um Ihnen zu erzählen, wie wir die traurigen Nachrichten dem verängstigten Mädchen beibrachten, wie wir sie am Morgen zum Zug zu ihrer guten Tante in Harrow begleiteten, und wie der langsame Prozess der offiziellen Untersuchung zu dem Ergebnis kam, dass der Doktor seinen Tod fand, als er unvorsichtig mit einem gefährlichen Haustier spielte. Das wenige, das ich noch über den Fall lernen musste, erzählte mir Sherlock Holmes, als wir am nächsten Tag zurück reisten.

“Ich war,” sagte er, “zu einer völlig falschen Schlussfolgerung gekommen, das zeigt, mein lieber Watson, wie gefährlich es ist, aus ungenügenden Daten zu schließen. Die Anwesenheit der Zigeuner, und die Verwendung des Wortes ‚Band‘, das das arme Mädchen verwendet hat, ohne Zweifel als Erklärung für die Erscheinung, die sie während eines kurzen Blickes im Licht ihres Streichholzes, hatte, hat mich auf die falsche Fährte gebracht. Ich kann nur behaupten, dass ich sofort meine Position überdachte als klar wurde, dass welche Gefahr auch immer den Bewohner des Zimmers bedrohte, weder vom Fenster noch von der Tür kommen konnte. Meine Aufmerksamkeit wurde schnell auf den Ventilator und das Seil gerichtet, wie ich Ihnen berichtete. Die Entdeckung, dass es eine Attrappe war, und dass das Bett am Boden festgemacht war, ließ die Vermutung aufkommen, dass das Seil eine Brücke darstellte von dem Loch zum Bett. Die Idee einer Schlange kam mir sofort, zusammen mit dem Wissen, dass der Doktor Kreaturen aus Indien bezog, gab mir das Gefühl, dass ich vermutlich auf dem richtigen Weg war.  Der Gedanke, eine Form von Gift zu verwenden, das nicht durch chemische Tests entdeckt werden kann, war etwas, was einem cleveren  und rücksichtlosen Mann mit Erfahrung im Osten einfallen würde. Die Schnelligkeit, mit der ein solches Gift wirken würde, wäre aus seiner Sicht ebenso ein Vorteil. Es wäre ein sehr scharfsichtiger Leichenbeschauer notwendig sein, der die beiden dunklen Punkte erkannt hätte, die zeigen würden, wo die Giftzähne ihre Arbeit getan hatten. Dann dachte ich an die Pfeife. Natürlich muss er die Schlange zurückholen, bevor das Morgenlicht es dem Opfer enthüllen würde. Er hat sie trainiert, vermutlich mithilfe der Milch, die wir gesehen haben, zu ihm zurückzukehren, wenn er rief. Er würde sie zur passenden Stunde durch das Ventilator-Loch bringen mit der Sicherheit, dass sie das Seil hinunterkriechen würde und auf dem Bett landen würde. Sie würde oder würde nicht den Bewohner beißen, vielleicht ist sie jede Nacht davon gekommen für eine ganze Woche, aber früher oder später würde sie zum Opfer werden.

“Ich war zu diesen Schlussfolgerungen gekommen, bevor ich überhaupt den Raum betreten hatte. Eine Untersuchung seines Stuhles zeigte mir, dass er die Gewohnheit hatte, darauf zu stehen, was natürlich notwendig war, um an den Ventilator zu reichen. Der Anblick des Safes, die Untertasse mit Milch, und die Schlaufe an der Peitsche waren genug, um endlich alle Zweifel zu beseitigen, die noch übrig waren. Der metallische Ton, den Miss Stoner gehört hatte, offensichtlich als ihr Stiefvater die Tür des Safes ein wenig zu hastig hinter seinem schrecklichen Bewohner schloss. Nachdem ich mir einmal sicher war, wissen Sie ja, welche Schritte ich unternahm, diese Angelegenheit zu beweisen. Ich hörte die Kreatur zischen, so wie Sie ohne Zweifel auch, und ich machte sofort Licht an und griff es an.

“Mit dem Ergebnis, dass Sie sie durch den Ventilator drängten.“

“Und auch mit dem Erbnis, dass sie sich gegen ihren Meister auf der anderen pagina wandte. Einige meiner Schläge trafen und erhitzten sein Schlangentemperament, dass sie sich gegen die erste Person wandte, die sie sah. Auf diese Weise, bin ich sicher, dass ich indirekt selbst für den Tod von Dr. Grimesby Roylott bin, und ich kann nicht sagen, dass es schwer auf meinem Gewissen lastet.“