The Red-headed League
by Arthur Conan Doyle  

I had called upon my friend, Mr. Sherlock Holmes, one day in the autumn of last year, and found him in deep conversation with a very stout, florid-faced, elderly gentleman, with fiery red hair. With an apology for my intrusion, I was about to withdraw, when Holmes pulled me abruptly into the room, and closed the door behind me.

“You could not possibly have come at a better time, my dear Watson,” he said cordially.

“I was afraid that you were engaged.”

“So I am. Very much so.”

“Then I can wait in the next room.”

“Not at all. This gentleman, Mr. Wilson, has been my partner and helper in many of my most successful cases, and I have no doubt that he will be of the utmost use to me in yours also.”

The stout gentleman half rose from his chair, and gave a bob of greeting, with a quick little questioning glance from his small, fat-encircled eyes.

“Try the settee,” said Holmes, relapsing into his armchair, and putting his fingertips together, as was his custom when in judicial moods. “I know, my dear Watson, that you share my love of all that is bizarre and outside the conventions and humdrum routine of every-day life. You have shown your relish for it by the enthusiasm which has prompted you to chronicle, and, if you will excuse my saying so, somewhat to embellish so many of my own little adventures.”

“Your cases have indeed been of the greatest interest to me,” I observed.

“You will remember that I remarked the other day, just before we went into the very simple problem presented by Miss Mary Sutherland, that for strange effects and extraordinary combinations we must go to life itself, which is always far more daring than any effort of the imagination.”

“A proposition which I took the liberty of doubting.”

“You did, Doctor, but none the less you must come round to my view, for otherwise I shall keep on piling fact upon fact on you until your reason breaks down under them and acknowledges me to be right. Now, Mr. Jabez Wilson here has been good enough to call upon me this morning, and to begin a narrative which promises to be one of the most singular which I have listened to for some time. You have heard me remark that the strangest and most unique things are very often connected not with the larger but with the smaller crimes, and occasionally, indeed, where there is room for doubt whether any positive crime has been committed. As far as I have heard, it is impossible for me to say whether the present case is an instance of crime or not, but the course of events is certainly among the most singular that I have ever listened to. Perhaps, Mr. Wilson, you would have the great kindness to recommence your narrative. I ask you, not merely because my friend Dr. Watson has not heard the opening part, but also because the peculiar nature of the story makes me anxious to have every possible detail from your lips. As a rule, when I have heard some slight indication of the course of events, I am able to guide myself by the thousands of other similar cases which occur to my memory. In the present instance I am forced to admit that the facts are, to the best of my belief, unique.”

The portly client puffed out his chest with an appearance of some little pride, and pulled a dirty and wrinkled newspaper from the inside pocket of his greatcoat. As he glanced down the advertisement column, with his head thrust forward, and the paper flattened out upon his knee, I took a good look at the man, and endeavoured, after the fashion of my companion, to read the indications which might be presented by his dress or appearance.

I did not gain very much, however, by my inspection. Our visitor bore every mark of being an average commonplace British tradesman, obese, pompous, and slow. He wore rather baggy gray shepherd's check trousers, a not overclean black frockcoat, unbuttoned in the front, and a drab waistcoat with a heavy brassy Albert chain, and a square pierced bit of metal dangling down as an ornament. A frayed top hat and a faded brown overcoat with a wrinkled velvet collar lay upon a chair beside him. Altogether, look as I would, there was nothing remarkable about the man save his blazing red head, and the expression of extreme chagrin and discontent upon his features.

Sherlock Holmes' quick eye took in my occupation, and he shook his head with a smile as he noticed my questioning glances. “Beyond the obvious facts that he has at some time done manual labour, that he takes snuff, that he is a Freemason, that he has been in China, and that he has done a considerable amount of writing lately, I can deduce nothing else.”

Mr. Jabez Wilson started up in his chair, with his forefinger upon the paper, but his eyes upon my companion.

“How, in the name of good fortune, did you know all that, Mr. Holmes?” he asked. “How did you know, for example, that I did manual labour. It's as true as gospel, for I began as a ship's carpenter.”

“Your hands, my dear sir. Your right hand is quite a size larger than your left. You have worked with it, and the muscles are more developed.”

“Well, the snuff, then, and the Freemasonry?”

“I won't insult your intelligence by telling you how I read that, especially as, rather against the strict rules of your order, you use an arc and compass breastpin.”

“Ah, of course, I forgot that. But the writing?”

“What else can be indicated by that right cuff so very shiny for five inches, and the left one with the smooth patch near the elbow where you rest it upon the desk.”

“Well, but China?”

“The fish which you have tattooed immediately above your right wrist could only have been done in China. I have made a small study of tattoo marks, and have even contributed to the letteraturae of the subject. That trick of staining the fishes' scales of a delicate pink is quite peculiar to China. When, in addition, I see a Chinese coin hanging from your watch-chain, the matter becomes even more simple.”

Mr. Jabez Wilson laughed heavily. “Well, I never!” said he. “I thought at first that you had done something clever, but I see that there was nothing in it after all.”

“I begin to think, Watson,” said Holmes, “that I make a mistake in explaining. ‘Omne ignotum pro magnifico,’ you know, and my poor little reputation, such as it is, will suffer shipwreck if I am so candid. Can you not find the advertisement, Mr. Wilson?”

“Yes, I have got it now,” he answered, with his thick, red finger planted half-way down the column. “Here it is. This is what began it all. You just read it for yourself, sir.”

I took the paper from him, and read as follows:—

“To the Red-Headed League. On account of the bequest of the late Ezekiah Hopkins, of Lebanon, Penn., U.S.A., there is now another vacancy open which entitles a member of the League to a salary of four pounds a week for purely nominal services. All red-headed men who are sound in body and mind, and above the age of twenty-one years, are eligible. Apply in person on Monday, at eleven o'clock, to Duncan Ross, at the offices of the League, 7, Pope's-court, Fleet-street.”

“What on earth does this mean?” I ejaculated, after I had twice read over the extraordinary announcement.

Holmes chuckled, and wriggled in his chair, as was his habit when in high spirits. “It is a little off the beaten track, isn't it?” said he. “And now, Mr. Wilson, off you go at scratch, and tell us all about yourself, your household, and the effect which this advertisement had upon your fortunes. You will first make a note, Doctor, of the paper and the date.”

“It is The Morning Chronicle, of April 27, 1890. Just two months ago.”

“Very good. Now, Mr. Wilson?”

“Well, it is just as I have been telling you, Mr. Sherlock Holmes,” said Jabez Wilson, mopping his forehead, “I have a small pawnbroker's business at Coburg-square, near the City. It's not a very large affair, and of late years it has not done more than just give me a living. I used to be able to keep two assistants, but now I only keep one; and I would have a job to pay him, but that he is willing to come for half wages, so as to learn the business.”

“What is the name of this obliging youth?” asked Sherlock Holmes.

“His name is Vincent Spaulding, and he's not such a youth either. It's hard to say his age. I should not wish a smarter assistant, Mr. Holmes; and I know very well that he could better himself, and earn twice what I am able to give him. But after all, if he is satisfied, why should I put ideas in his head?”

“Why, indeed? You seem most fortunate in having an employé who comes under the full market price. It is not a common experience among employers in this age. I don't know that your assistant is not as remarkable as your advertisement.”

“Oh, he has his faults, too,” said Mr. Wilson. “Never was such a fellow for photography. Snapping away with a camera when he ought to be improving his mind, and then diving down into the cellar like a rabbit into its hole to develop his pictures. That is his main fault; but, on the whole, he's a good worker. There's no vice in him.”

“He is still with you, I presume?”

“Yes, sir. He and a girl of fourteen, who does a bit of simple cooking, and keeps the place clean—that's all I have in the house, for I am a widower, and never had any family. We live very quietly, sir, the three of us; and we keep a roof over our heads, and pay our debts, if we do nothing more.

“The first thing that put us out was that advertisement. Spaulding, he came down into the office just this day eight weeks with this very paper in his hand, and he says:—

“‘I wish to the Lord, Mr. Wilson, that I was a red-headed man.’

“‘Why that?’ I asks.

“‘Why,’ says he, ‘here's another vacancy on the League of the Red-headed Men. It's worth quite a little fortune to any man who gets it, and I understand that there are more vacancies than there are men, so that the trustees are at their wits' end what to do with the money. If my hair would only change colour, here's a nice little crib all ready for me to step into.’

“‘Why, what is it, then?’ I asked. You see, Mr. Holmes, I am a very stay-at-home man, and, as my business came to me instead of my having to go to it, I was often weeks on end without putting my foot over the door-mat. In that way I didn't know much of what was going on outside, and I was always glad of a bit of news.

“‘Have you never heard of the League of the Red-headed Men?’ he asked, with his eyes open.

“‘Never.’

“‘Why, I wonder at that, for you are eligible yourself for one of the vacancies.’

“‘And what are they worth?’ I asked.

“‘Oh, merely a couple of hundred a year, but the work is slight, and it need not interfere very much with one's other occupations.’

“Well, you can easily think that that made me prick up my ears, for the business has not been over good for some years, and an extra couple of hundred would have been very handy.

“‘Tell me all about it,’ said I.

“‘Well,’ said he, showing me the advertisement, ‘you can see for yourself that the League has a vacancy, and there is the address where you should apply for particulars. As far as I can make out, the League was founded by an American millionaire, Ezekiah Hopkins, who was very peculiar in his ways. He was himself red-headed, and he had a great sympathy for all red-headed men; so, when he died, it was found that he had left his enormous fortune in the hands of trustees, with instructions to apply the interest to the providing of easy berths to men whose hair is of that colour. From all I hear it is splendid pay, and very little to do.’

“‘But,’ said I, ‘there would be millions of red-headed men who would apply.’

“‘Not so many as you might think,’ he answered. ‘You see it is really confined to Londoners, and to grown men. This American had started from London when he was young, and he wanted to do the old town a good turn. Then, again, I have heard it is no use your applying if your hair is light red, or dark red, or anything but real, bright, blazing, fiery red. Now, if you cared to apply, Mr. Wilson, you would just walk in; but perhaps it would hardly be worth your while to put yourself out of the way for the sake of a few hundred pounds.’

“Now, it is a fact, gentlemen, as you may see for yourselves, that my hair is of a very full and rich tint, so that it seemed to me that, if there was to be any competition in the matter, I stood as good a chance as any man that I had ever met. Vincent Spaulding seemed to know so much about it that I thought he might prove useful, so I just ordered him to put up the shutters for the day, and to come right away with me. He was very willing to have a holiday, so we shut the business up, and started off for the address that was given us in the advertisement.

“I never hope to see such a sight as that again, Mr. Holmes. From north, south, east, and west every man who had a shade of red in his hair had tramped into the City to answer the advertisement. Fleet-street was choked with red-headed folk, and Pope's-court looked like a coster's orange barrow. I should not have thought there were so many in the whole country as were brought together by that single advertisement. Every shade of colour they were—straw, lemon, orange, brick, Irish-setter, liver, clay; but, as Spaulding said, there were not many who had the real vivid flame-coloured tint. When I saw how many were waiting, I would have given it up in despair; but Spaulding would not hear of it. How he did it I could not imagine, but he pushed and pulled and butted until he got me through the crowd, and right up to the steps which led to the office. There was a double stream upon the stair, some going up in hope, and some coming back dejected; but we wedged in as well as we could, and soon found ourselves in the office.”

“Your experience has been a most entertaining one,” remarked Holmes, as his client paused and refreshed his memory with a huge pinch of snuff. “Pray continue your very interesting statement.”

“There was nothing in the office but a couple of wooden chairs and a deal table, behind which sat a small man, with a head that was even redder than mine. He said a few words to each candidate as he came up, and then he always managed to find some fault in them which would disqualify them. Getting a vacancy did not seem to be such a very easy matter after all. However, when our turn came, the little man was much more favourable to me than to any of the others, and he closed the door as we entered, so that he might have a private word with us.

“‘This is Mr. Jabez Wilson,’ said my assistant, ‘and he is willing to fill a vacancy in the League.’

“‘And he is admirably suited for it,’ the other answered. ‘He has every requirement. I cannot recall when I have seen anything so fine.’ He took a step backwards, cocked his head on one side, and gazed at my hair until I felt quite bashful. Then suddenly he plunged forward, wrung my hand, and congratulated me warmly on my success.

“‘It would be injustice to hesitate,’ said he. ‘You will, however, I am sure, excuse me for taking an obvious precaution.’ With that he seized my hair in both his hands, and tugged until I yelled with the pain. ‘There is water in your eyes,’ said he, as he released me. ‘I perceive that all is as it should be. But we have to be careful, for we have twice been deceived by wigs and once by paint. I could tell you tales of cobbler's wax which would disgust you with human nature.’ He stepped over to the window, and shouted through it at the top of his voice that the vacancy was filled. A groan of disappointment came up from below, and the folk all trooped away in different directions, until there was not a red head to be seen except my own and that of the manager.

“‘My name,’ said he, ‘is Mr. Duncan Ross, and I am myself one of the pensioners upon the fund left by our noble benefactor. Are you a married man, Mr. Wilson? Have you a family?’

“I answered that I had not.

“His face fell immediately.

“‘Dear me!’ he said, gravely, ‘that is very serious indeed! I am sorry to hear you say that. The fund was, of course, for the propagation and spread of the red-heads as well as for their maintenance. It is exceedingly unfortunate that you should be a bachelor.’

“My face lengthened at this, Mr. Holmes, for I thought that I was not to have the vacancy after all; but, after thinking it over for a few minutes, he said that it would be all right.

“‘In the case of another,’ said he, ‘the objection might be fatal, but we must stretch a point in favour of a man with such a head of hair as yours. When shall you be able to enter upon your new duties?’

“‘Well, it is a little awkward, for I have a business already,’ said I.

“‘Oh, never mind about that, Mr. Wilson!’ said Vincent Spaulding. ‘I shall be able to look after that for you.’

“‘What would be the hours?’ I asked.

“‘Ten to two.’

“Now a pawnbroker's business is mostly done of an evening, Mr. Holmes, especially Thursday and Friday evening, which is just before pay-day; so it would suit me very well to earn a little in the mornings. Besides, I knew that my assistant was a good man, and that he would see to anything that turned up.

“‘That would suit me very well,’ said I. ‘And the pay?’

“‘Is four pounds a week.’

“‘And the work?’

“‘Is purely nominal.’

“‘What do you call purely nominal?’

“‘Well, you have to be in the office, or at least in the building, the whole time. If you leave, you forfeit your whole position for ever. The will is very clear upon that point. You don't comply with the conditions if you budge from the office during that time.’

“‘It's only four hours a day, and I should not think of leaving,’ said I.

“‘No excuse will avail,’ said Mr. Duncan Ross, ‘neither sickness, nor business, nor anything else. There you must stay, or you lose your billet.’

“‘And the work?’

“‘Is to copy out the “Encyclopædia Britannica.” There is the first volume of it in that press. You must find your own ink, pens, and blotting-paper, but we provide this table and chair. Will you be ready to-morrow?’

“‘Certainly,’ I answered.

“‘Then, good-bye, Mr. Jabez Wilson, and let me congratulate you once more on the important position which you have been fortunate enough to gain.’ He bowed me out of the room, and I went home with my assistant, hardly knowing what to say or do, I was so pleased at my own good fortune.

“Well, I thought over the matter all day, and by evening I was in low spirits again; for I had quite persuaded myself that the whole affair must be some great hoax or fraud, though what its object might be I could not imagine. It seemed altogether past belief that anyone could make such a will, or that they would pay such a sum for doing anything so simple as copying out the ‘Encyclopædia Britannica.’ Vincent Spaulding did what he could to cheer me up, but by bedtime I had reasoned myself out of the whole thing. However, in the morning I determined to have a look at it anyhow, so I bought a penny bottle of ink, and with a quill pen, and seven sheets of foolscap paper, I started off for Pope's-court.

“Well, to my surprise and delight everything was as right as possible. The table was set out ready for me, and Mr. Duncan Ross was there to see that I got fairly to work. He started me off upon the letter A, and then he left me; but he would drop in from time to time to see that all was right with me. At two o'clock he bade me good-day, complimented me upon the amount that I had written, and locked the door of the office after me.

“This went on day after day, Mr. Holmes, and on Saturday the manager came in and planked down four golden sovereigns for my week's work. It was the same next week, and the same the week after. Every morning I was there at ten, and every afternoon I left at two. By degrees Mr. Duncan Ross took to coming in only once of a morning, and then, after a time, he did not come in at all. Still, of course, I never dared to leave the room for an instant, for I was not sure when he might come, and the billet was such a good one, and suited me so well, that I would not risk the loss of it.

“Eight weeks passed away like this, and I had written about Abbots, and Archery, and Armour, and Architecture, and Attica, and hoped with diligence that I might get on to the Bs before very long. It cost me something in foolscap, and I had pretty nearly filled a shelf with my writings. And then suddenly the whole business came to an end.”

“To an end?”

“Yes, sir. And no later than this morning. I went to my work as usual at ten o'clock, but the door was shut and locked, with a little square of cardboard hammered on to the middle of the panel with a tack. Here it is, and you can read for yourself.”

He held up a piece of white cardboard, about the size of a sheet of notepaper. It read in this fashion:—

“The Red-Headed League
is
Dissolved.

Oct. 9, 1890.”
Sherlock Holmes and I surveyed this curt announcement and the rueful face behind it, until the comical side of the affair so completely overtopped every other consideration that we both burst out into a roar of laughter.

“I cannot see that there is anything very funny,” cried our client, flushing up to the roots of his flaming head. “If you can do nothing better than laugh at me, I can go elsewhere.”

“No, no,” cried Holmes, shoving him back into the chair from which he had half risen. “I really wouldn't miss your case for the world. It is most refreshingly unusual. But there is, if you will excuse my saying so, something just a little funny about it. Pray what steps did you take when you found the card upon the door?”

“I was staggered, sir. I did not know what to do. Then I called at the offices round, but none of them seemed to know anything about it. Finally, I went to the landlord, who is an accountant living on the ground floor, and I asked him if he could tell me what had become of the Red-headed League. He said that he had never heard of any such body. Then I asked him who Mr. Duncan Ross was. He answered that the name was new to him.

“‘Well,’ said I, ‘the gentleman at No. 4.’

“‘What, the red-headed man?’

“‘Yes.’

“‘Oh,’ said he, ‘his name was William Morris. He was a solicitor, and was using my room as a temporary convenience until his new premises were ready. He moved out yesterday.’

“‘Where could I find him?’

“‘Oh, at his new offices. He did tell me the address. Yes, 17, King Edward-street, near St. Paul's.’

“I started off, Mr. Holmes, but when I got to that address it was a manufactory of artificial knee-caps, and no one in it had ever heard of either Mr. William Morris, or Mr. Duncan Ross.”

“And what did you do then?” asked Holmes.

“I went home to Saxe-Coburg-square, and I took the advice of my assistant. But he could not help me in any way. He could only say that if I waited I should hear by post. But that was not quite good enough, Mr. Holmes. I did not wish to lose such a place without a struggle, so, as I had heard that you were good enough to give advice to poor folk who were in need of it, I came right away to you.”

“And you did very wisely,” said Holmes. “Your case is an exceedingly remarkable one, and I shall be happy to look into it. From what you have told me I think that it is possible that graver issues hang from it than might at first sight appear.”

“Grave enough!” said Mr. Jabez Wilson. “Why, I have lost four pound a week.”

“As far as you are personally concerned,” remarked Holmes, “I do not see that you have any grievance against this extraordinary league. On the contrary, you are, as I understand, richer by some thirty pounds, to say nothing of the minute knowledge which you have gained on every subject which comes under the letter A. You have lost nothing by them.”

“No, sir. But I want to find out about them, and who they are, and what their object was in playing this prank—if it was a prank—upon me. It was a pretty expensive joke for them, for it cost them two and thirty pounds.”

“We shall endeavor to clear up these points for you. And, first, one or two questions, Mr. Wilson. This assistant of yours who first called your attention to the advertisement—how long had he been with you?”

“About a month then.”

“How did he come?”

“In answer to an advertisement.”

“Was he the only applicant?”

“No, I had a dozen.”

“Why did you pick him?”

“Because he was handy, and would come cheap.”

“At half wages, in fact.”

“Yes.”

“What is he like, this Vincent Spaulding?”

“Small, stout-built, very quick in his ways, no hair on his face, though he's not short of thirty. Has a white splash of acid upon his forehead.”

Holmes sat up in his chair in considerable excitement. “I thought as much,” said he. “Have you ever observed that his ears are pierced for earrings?”

“Yes, sir. He told me that a gypsy had done it for him when he was a lad.”

“Hum!” said Holmes, sinking back in deep thought. “He is still with you?”

“Oh, yes, sir; I have only just left him.”

“And has your business been attended to in your absence?”

“Nothing to complain of, sir. There's never very much to do of a morning.”

“That will do, Mr. Wilson. I shall be happy to give you an opinion upon the subject in the course of a day or two. To-day is Saturday, and I hope that by Monday we may come to a conclusion.”

“Well, Watson,” said Holmes, when our visitor had left us, “what do you make of it all?”

“I make nothing of it,” I answered, frankly. “It is a most mysterious business.”

“As a rule,” said Holmes, “the more bizarre a thing is the less mysterious it proves to be. It is your commonplace, featureless crimes which are really puzzling, just as a commonplace face is the most difficult to identify. But I must be prompt over this matter.”

“What are you going to do then?” I asked.

“To smoke,” he answered. “It is quite a three pipe problem, and I beg that you won't speak to me for fifty minutes.” He curled himself up in his chair, with his thin knees drawn up to his hawk-like nose, and there he sat with his eyes closed and his black clay pipe thrusting out like the bill of some strange bird. I had come to the conclusion that he had dropped asleep, and indeed was nodding myself, when he suddenly sprang out of his chair with the gesture of a man who has made up his mind, and put his pipe down upon the mantelpiece.

“Sarasate plays at the St. James's Hall this afternoon,” he remarked. “What do you think, Watson? Could your patients spare you for a few hours?”

“I have nothing to do to-day. My practice is never very absorbing.”

“Then, put on your hat, and come. I am going through the City first, and we can have some lunch on the way. I observe that there is a good deal of German music on the programme, which is rather more to my taste than Italian or French. It is introspective, and I want to introspect. Come along!”

We travelled by the Underground as far as Aldersgate; and a short walk took us to Saxe-Coburg-square, the scene of the singular story which we had listened to in the morning. It was a poky, little, shabby-genteel place, where four lines of dingy two-storied brick houses looked out into a small railed-in enclosure, where a lawn of weedy grass, and a few clumps of faded laurel bushes made a hard fight against a smoke-laden and uncongenial atmosphere. Three gilt balls and a brown board with “Jabez Wilson” in white letters, upon a corner house, announced the place where our red-headed client carried on his business. Sherlock Holmes stopped in front of it with his head on one side, and looked it all over, with his eyes shining brightly between puckered lids. Then he walked slowly up the street, and then down again to the corner, still looking keenly at the houses. Finally he returned to the pawnbroker's, and, having thumped vigorously upon the pavement with his stick two or three times, he went up to the door and knocked. It was instantly opened by a bright-looking, clean-shaven young fellow, who asked him to step in.

“Thank you,” said Holmes, “I only wished to ask you how you would go from here to the Strand.”

“Third right, fourth left,” answered the assistant promptly, closing the door.

“Smart fellow, that,” observed Holmes, as we walked away. “He is, in my judgment, the fourth smartest man in London, and for daring I am not sure that he has not a claim to be third. I have known something of him before.”

“Evidently,” said I, “Mr. Wilson's assistant counts for a good deal in this mystery of the Red-headed League. I am sure that you inquired your way merely in order that you might see him.”

“Not him.”

“What then?”

“The knees of his trousers.”

“And what did you see?”

“What I expected to see.”

“Why did you beat the pavement?”

“My dear Doctor, this is a time for observation, not for talk. We are spies in an enemy's country. We know something of Saxe-Coburg-square. Let us now explore the parts which lie behind it.”

The road in which we found ourselves as we turned round the corner from the retired Saxe-Coburg-square presented as great a contrast to it as the front of a picture does to the back. It was one of the main arteries which convey the traffic of the City to the north and west. The roadway was blocked with the immense stream of commerce flowing in a double tide inwards and outwards, while the footpaths were black with the hurrying swarm of pedestrians. It was difficult to realize as we looked at the line of fine shops and stately business premises that they really abutted on the other side upon the faded and stagnant square which we had just quitted.

“Let me see,” said Holmes, standing at the corner, and glancing along the line, “I should like just to remember the order of the houses here. It is a hobby of mine to have an exact knowledge of London. There is Mortimer's, the tobacconist, the little newspaper shop, the Coburg branch of the City and Suburban Bank, the Vegetarian Restaurant, and McFarlane's carriage-building depôt. That carries us right on to the other block. And now, Doctor, we've done our work, so it's time we had some play. A sandwich, and a cup of coffee, and then off to violin-land, where all is sweetness, and delicacy, and harmony, and there are no red-headed clients to vex us with their conundrums.”

My friend was an enthusiastic musician, being himself not only a very capable performer, but a composer of no ordinary merit. All the afternoon he sat in the stalls wrapped in the most perfect happiness, gently waving his long, thin fingers in time to the music, while his gently smiling face and his languid, dreamy eyes were as unlike those of Holmes the sleuth-hound; Holmes the relentless, keen-witted, ready-handed criminal agent, as it was possible to conceive. In his singular character the dual nature alternately asserted itself, and his extreme exactness and astuteness represented, as I have often thought, the reaction against the poetic and contemplative mood which occasionally predominated in him. The swing of his nature took him from extreme languor to devouring energy; and, as I knew well, he was never so truly formidable as when, for days on end, he had been lounging in his armchair amid his improvisations and his black-letter editions. Then it was that the lust of the chase would suddenly come upon him, and that his brilliant reasoning power would rise to the level of intuition, until those who were unacquainted with his methods would look askance at him as on a man whose knowledge was not that of other mortals. When I saw him that afternoon so enwrapped in the music at St. James's Hall I felt that an evil time might be coming upon those whom he had set himself to hunt down.

“You want to go home, no doubt, Doctor,” he remarked, as we emerged.

“Yes, it would be as well.”

“And I have some business to do which will take some hours. This business at Coburg-square is serious.”

“Why serious?”

“A considerable crime is in contemplation. I have every reason to believe that we shall be in time to stop it. But to-day being Saturday rather complicates matters. I shall want your help to-night.”

“At what time?”

“Ten will be early enough.”

“I shall be at Baker-street at ten.”

“Very well. And, I say, Doctor! there may be some little danger, so kindly put your army revolver in your pocket.” He waved his hand, turned on his heel, and disappeared in an instant among the crowd.

I trust that I am not more dense than my neighbours, but I was always oppressed with a sense of my own stupidity in my dealings with Sherlock Holmes. Here I had heard what he had heard, I had seen what he had seen, and yet from his words it was evident that he saw clearly not only what had happened, but what was about to happen, while to me the whole business was still confused and grotesque. As I drove home to my house in Kensington I thought over it all, from the extraordinary story of the red-headed copier of the “Encyclopædia” down to the visit to Saxe-Coburg-square, and the ominous words with which he had parted from me. What was this nocturnal expedition, and why should I go armed? Where were we going, and what were we to do? I had the hint from Holmes that this smooth-faced pawnbroker's assistant was a formidable man—a man who might play a deep game. I tried to puzzle it out, but gave it up in despair, and set the matter aside until night should bring an explanation.

It was a quarter past nine when I started from home and made my way across the Park, and so through Oxford-street to Baker-street. Two hansoms were standing at the door, and, as I entered the passage, I heard the sound of voices from above. On entering his room, I found Holmes in animated conversation with two men, one of whom I recognized as Peter Jones, the official police agent; while the other was a long, thin, sad-faced man, with a very shiny hat and oppressively respectable frock-coat.

“Ha! our party is complete,” said Holmes, buttoning up his pea-jacket, and taking his heavy hunting crop from the rack. “Watson, I think you know Mr. Jones, of Scotland-yard? Let me introduce you to Mr. Merryweather, who is to be our companion in to-night's adventure.”

“We're hunting in couples again, Doctor, you see,” said Jones, in his consequential way. “Our friend here is a wonderful man for starting a chase. All he wants is an old dog to help him to do the running down.”

“I hope a wild goose may not prove to be the end of our chase,” observed Mr. Merryweather, gloomily.

“You may place considerable confidence in Mr. Holmes, sir,” said the police agent, loftily. “He has his own little methods, which are, if he won't mind my saying so, just a little too theoretical and fantastic, but he has the makings of a detective in him. It is not too much to say that once or twice, as in that business of the Sholto murder and the Agra treasure, he has been more nearly correct than the official force.”

“Oh, if you say so, Mr. Jones, it is all right!” said the stranger, with deference. “Still, I confess that I miss my rubber. It is the first Saturday night for seven-and-twenty years that I have not had my rubber.”

“I think you will find,” said Sherlock Holmes, “that you will play for a higher stake to-night than you have ever done yet, and that the play will be more exciting. For you, Mr. Merryweather, the stake will be some thirty thousand pounds; and for you, Jones, it will be the man upon whom you wish to lay your hands.”

“John Clay, the murderer, thief, smasher and forger. He's a young man, Mr. Merryweather, but he is at the head of his profession, and I would rather have my bracelets on him than on any criminal in London. He's a remarkable man, is young John Clay. His grandfather was a Royal Duke, and he himself has been to Eton and Oxford. His brain is as cunning as his fingers, and though we meet signs of him at every turn, we never know where to find the man himself. He'll crack a crib in Scotland one week, and be raising money to build an orphanage in Cornwall the next. I've been on his track for years, and have never set eyes on him yet.”

“I hope that I may have the pleasure of introducing you to-night. I've had one or two little turns also with Mr. John Clay, and I agree with you that he is at the head of his profession. It is past ten, however, and quite time that we started. If you two will take the first hansom, Watson and I will follow in the second.”

Sherlock Holmes was not very communicative during the long drive, and lay back in the cab humming the tunes which he had heard in the afternoon. We rattled through an endless labyrinth of gas-lit streets until we emerged into Farringdon-street.

“We are close there now,” my friend remarked. “This fellow Merryweather is a bank director and personally interested in the matter. I thought it as well to have Jones with us also. He is not a bad fellow, though an absolute imbecile in his profession. He has one positive virtue. He is as brave as a bulldog, and as tenacious as a lobster if he gets his claws upon anyone. Here we are, and they are waiting for us.”

We had reached the same crowded thoroughfare in which we had found ourselves in the morning. Our cabs were dismissed, and, following the guidance of Mr. Merryweather, we passed down a narrow passage, and through a side door, which he opened for us. Within there was a small corridor, which ended in a very massive iron gate. This also was opened, and led down a flight of winding stone steps, which terminated at another formidable gate. Mr. Merryweather stopped to light a lantern, and then conducted us down a dark, earth-smelling passage, and so, after opening a third door, into a huge vault or cellar, which was piled all round with crates and massive boxes.

“You are not very vulnerable from above,” Holmes remarked, as he held up the lantern, and gazed about him.

“Nor from below,” said Mr. Merryweather, striking his stick upon the flags which lined the floor. “Why, dear me, it sounds quite hollow!” he remarked, looking up in surprise.

“I must really ask you to be a little more quiet,” said Holmes, severely. “You have already imperilled the whole success of our expedition. Might I beg that you would have the goodness to sit down upon one of those boxes, and not to interfere?”

The solemn Mr. Merryweather perched himself upon a crate, with a very injured expression upon his face, while Holmes fell upon his knees upon the floor, and, with the lantern and a magnifying lens, began to examine minutely the cracks between the stones. A few seconds sufficed to satisfy him, for he sprang to his feet again, and put his glass in his pocket.

“We have at least an hour before us,” he remarked, “for they can hardly take any steps until the good pawnbroker is safely in bed. Then they will not lose a minute, for the sooner they do their work the longer time they will have for their escape. We are at present, Doctor—as no doubt you have divined—in the cellar of the City branch of one of the principal London banks. Mr. Merryweather is the chairman of directors, and he will explain to you that there are reasons why the more daring criminals of London should take a considerable interest in this cellar at present.”

“It is our French gold,” whispered the director. “We have had several warnings that an attempt might be made upon it.”

“Your French gold?”

“Yes. We had occasion some months ago to strengthen our resources, and borrowed, for that purpose, thirty thousand napoleons from the Bank of France. It has become known that we have never had occasion to unpack the money, and that it is still lying in our cellar. The crate upon which I sit contains two thousand napoleons packed between layers of lead foil. Our reserve of bullion is much larger at present than is usually kept in a single branch office, and the directors have had misgivings upon the subject.”

“Which were very well justified,” observed Holmes. “And now it is time that we arranged our little plans. I expect that within an hour matters will come to a head. In the meantime, Mr. Merryweather, we must put the screen over that dark lantern.”

“And sit in the dark?”

“I am afraid so. I had brought a pack of cards in my pocket, and I thought that, as we were a partie carrée, you might have your rubber after all. But I see that the enemy's preparations have gone so far that we cannot risk the presence of a light. And, first of all, we must choose our positions. These are daring men, and, though we shall take them at a disadvantage they may do us some harm, unless we are careful. I shall stand behind this crate, and do you conceal yourselves behind those. Then, when I flash a light upon them, close in swiftly. If they fire, Watson, have no compunction about shooting them down.”

I placed my revolver, cocked, upon the top of the wooden case behind which I crouched. Holmes shot the slide across the front of his lantern, and left us in pitch darkness—such an absolute darkness as I have never before experienced. The smell of hot metal remained to assure us that the light was still there, ready to flash out at a moment's notice. To me, with my nerves worked up to a pitch of expectancy, there was something depressing and subduing in the sudden gloom, and in the cold, dank air of the vault.

“They have but one retreat,” whispered Holmes. “That is back through the house into Saxe-Coburg-square. I hope that you have done what I asked you, Jones?”

“l have an inspector and two officers waiting at the front door.”

“Then we have stopped all the holes. And now we must be silent and wait.”

What a time it seemed! From comparing notes afterwards it was but an hour and a quarter, yet it appeared to me that the night must have almost gone, and the dawn be breaking above us. My limbs were weary and stiff, for I feared to change my position, yet my nerves were worked up to the highest pitch of tension, and my hearing was so acute that I could not only hear the gentle breathing of my companions, but I could distinguish the deeper, heavier in-breath of the bulky Jones from the thin, sighing note of the bank director. From my position I could look over the case in the direction of the floor. Suddenly my eyes caught the glint of a light.

At first it was but a lurid spark upon the stone pavement. Then it lengthened out until it became a yellow line, and then, without any warning or sound, a gash seemed to open and a hand appeared, a white, almost womanly hand, which felt about in the centre of the little area of light. For a minute or more the hand, with its writhing fingers, protruded out of the floor. Then it was withdrawn as suddenly as it appeared, and all was dark again save the single lurid spark, which marked a chink between the stones.

Its disappearance, however, was but momentary. With a rending, tearing sound, one of the broad, white stones turned over upon its side and left a square, gaping hole, through which streamed the light of a lantern. Over the edge there peeped a clean-cut, boyish face, which looked keenly about it, and then, with a hand on either side of the aperture, drew itself shoulder high and waist high, until one knee rested upon the edge. In another instant he stood at the side of the hole, and was hauling after him a companion, lithe and small like himself, with a pale face and a shock of very red hair.

“It's all clear,” he whispered. “Have you the chisel and the bags. Great Scott! Jump, Archie, jump, and I'll swing for it!”

Sherlock Holmes had sprung out and seized the intruder by the collar. The other dived down the hole, and I heard the sound of rending cloth as Jones clutched at his skirts. The light flashed upon the barrel of a revolver, but Holmes's hunting crop came down on the man's wrist, and the pistol clinked upon the stone floor.

“It's no use, John Clay,” said Holmes blandly, “You have no chance at all.”

“So I see,” the other answered, with the utmost coolness. “I fancy that my pal is all right, though I see you have got his coat-tails.”

“There are three men waiting for him at the door,” said Holmes.

“Oh, indeed. You seem to have done the thing very completely. I must compliment you.”

“And I you,” Holmes answered. “Your red-headed idea was very new and effective.”

“You'll see your pal again presently,” said Jones. “He's quicker at climbing down holes than I am. Just hold out while I fix the derbies.”

“I beg that you will not touch me with your filthy hands,” remarked our prisoner, as the handcuffs clattered upon his wrists. “You may not be aware that I have royal blood in my veins. Have the goodness also when you address me always to say ‘sir’ and ‘please.’”

“All right,” said Jones, with a stare and a snigger. “Well, would you please, sir, march upstairs, where we can get a cab to carry your highness to the police-station.”

“That is better,” said John Clay, serenely. He made a sweeping bow to the three of us, and walked quietly off in the custody of the detective.

“Really, Mr. Holmes,” said Mr. Merryweather, as we followed them from the cellar, “I do not know how the bank can thank you or repay you. There is no doubt that you have detected and defeated in the most complete manner one of the most determined attempts at bank robbery that have ever come within my experience.”

“I have had one or two little scores of my own to settle with Mr. John Clay,” said Holmes, “I have been at some small expense over this matter, which I shall expect the bank to refund, but beyond that I am amply repaid by having had an experience which is in many ways unique, and by hearing the very remarkable narrative of the Red-headed League.”

“You see, Watson,” he explained, in the early hours of the morning, as we sat over a glass of whisky and soda in Baker-street, “it was perfectly obvious from the first that the only possible object of this rather fantastic business of the advertisement of the League, and the copying of the ‘Encyclopædia,’ must be to get this not over-bright pawnbroker out of the way for a number of hours every day. It was a curious way of managing it, but really it would be difficult to suggest a better. The method was no doubt suggested to Clay's ingenious mind by the colour of his accomplice's hair. The four pounds a week was a lure which must draw him, and what was it to them, who were playing for thousands? They put in the advertisement, one rogue has the temporary office, the other rogue incites the man to apply for it, and together they manage to secure his absence every morning in the week. From the time that I heard of the assistant having come for half wages, it was obvious to me that he had some strong motive for securing the situation.”

“But how could you guess what the motive was?”

“Had there been women in the house, I should have suspected a mere vulgar intrigue. That, however, was out of the question. The man's business was a small one, and there was nothing in his house which could account for such elaborate preparations, and such an expenditure as they were at. It must then be something out of the house. What could it be? I thought of the assistant's fondness for photography, and his trick of vanishing into the cellar. The cellar! There was the end of this tangled clue. Then I made inquiries as to this mysterious assistant, and found that I had to deal with one of the coolest and most daring criminals in London. He was doing something in the cellar—something which took many hours a day for months on end. What could it be, once more? I could think of nothing save that he was running a tunnel to some other building.

“So far I had got when we went to visit the scene of action. I surprised you by beating upon the pavement with my stick. I was ascertaining whether the cellar stretched out in front or behind. It was not in front. Then I rang the bell, and, as I hoped, the assistant answered it. We have had some skirmishes, but we had never set eyes upon each other before. I hardly looked at his face. His knees were what I wished to see. You must yourself have remarked how worn, wrinkled, and stained they were. They spoke of those hours of burrowing. The only remaining point was what they were burrowing for. I walked round the corner, saw that the City and Suburban Bank abutted on our friend's premises, and felt that I had solved my problem. When you drove home after the concert I called upon Scotland Yard and upon the chairman of the bank directors, with the result that you have seen.”

“And how could you tell that they would make their attempt to-night?” I asked.

“Well, when they closed their League offices that was a sign that they cared no longer about Mr. Jabez Wilson's presence, in other words, that they had completed their tunnel. But it was essential that they should use it soon, as it might be discovered, or the bullion might be removed. Saturday would suit them better than any other day, as it would give them two days for their escape. For all these reasons I expected them to come to-night.”

“You reasoned it out beautifully,” I exclaimed in unfeigned admiration. “It is so long a chain, and yet every link rings true.”

“It saved me from ennui,” he answered, yawning. “Alas! I already feel it closing in upon me. My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence. These little problems help me to do so.”

“And you are a benefactor of the race,” said I.

He shrugged his shoulders. “Well, perhaps, after all, it is of some little use,” he remarked. “‘L'homme c'est rien—l'œuvre c'est tout,’ as Gustave Flaubert wrote to Georges Sand.”



 

Der Bund der Rothaarigen
Von Arthur Conan Doyle

An einem Tag im Herbst letzten Jahres hatte ich die Absicht meinem Freund, Sherlock Holmes, einen Besuch abzustatten, fand ihn jedoch ins Gespräch vertieft mit einem sehr korpulenten, rotgesichtigen, älteren Herrn mit feuerroten Haaren vertieft. Ich wollte mich schon zurückziehen und mich für mein Eindringen entschuldigen, als Holmes mich unvermittelt in den Raum zog und die Tür hinter mir schloss.

"Du hättest zu gar keinem besseren Zeitpunkt kommen können, mein lieber Watson", sagte er freundlich.

"Ich befürchtete, Sie seien beschäftigt."

"Das bin ich. Sogar sehr."

"Dann kann ich im Zimmer nebenan warten."

"Ganz und gar nicht. Dieser Herr, Mr. Wilson, war mein Partner und Gehilfe bei vielen meiner erfolgreichen Fälle und ich habe keinen Zweifel daran, dass er uns in Ihrem Fall ebenfalls von großem Nutzen sein wird."

Der korpulente Herr erhob sich halb von seinem Stuhl und nickte zum Gruß mit dem Kopf, wobei seine kleinen, fett umrundeten Augen fragend blickten.

"Setz dich auf das Sofa", sagte Holmes, ließ sich wieder in den Sessel fallen und legte die Fingerspitzen seiner Hände aufeinander, wie er es gewöhnlicht tat, wenn er in nachdenklicher Stimmung war. "Ich weiß meiner lieber Watson, dass Sie meine Liebe für alles Bizarre und außerhalb der Konventionen und langweiligen Routine des täglichen Lebens Liegende teilen. Den Genuss, den sie daraus ziehen haben Sie durch die Begeisterung gezeigt, mit welcher Sie meine kleinen Abenteuer festgehalten und, entschuldigen Sie, wenn ich das so sage, verschönt haben.

"Ihre Fälle haben mich tatsächlich sehr interessiert", merkte ich an.

"Sie werden sich daran erinnern, dass ich letztens, kurz bevor wir auf das einfache Problem stießen, das uns Miss Mary Sutherland vorlegte, ausführte, dass wir, suchen wir merkwürdige Effekte und außergewöhnliche Ereignisse, wir das Leben selbst betrachten müssen, welches immer kühner ist, als jede Anstrengung der Vorstellungskraft."

"Eine Behauptung, welche zu bezweifeln ich die Freiheit hatte."

"Sie taten dies, Doktor, doch werden Sie meinem Standpunkt entgegenkommen müssen, denn andernfalls werde ich fortfahren, Fakten auf Fakten auf Ihnen aufzutürmen, bis Ihre Argumente zusammenbrechen und sie eingestehen, dass ich Recht habe. Mr. Jabez Wilson war nun so gütig mir heute Morgen einen Besuch abzustatten und mir eine Geschichte zu erzählen, die verspricht eine der ungewöhnlichsten zu sein, welche ich seit langer Zeit gehört habe. Ihnen ist noch erinnerlich, dass die merkwürdigsten und außergewöhnlichsten Dinge oft nicht in den großen, sondern in den kleinen Verbrechen zu finden sind und manchmal sogar da, wo man noch zweifeln kann, ob überhaupt ein Verbrechen stattgefunden hat. Aus dem was ich bisher gehört habe, kann ich nicht eindeutig schließen, ob es sich bei dem vorliegenden Fall um ein Verbrechen handelt oder nicht, doch ist der Ablauf der Ereignisse sicherlich eines der merkwürdigsten Dinge, die ich jemals gehört habe. Vielleicht haben Sie die Güte Mr. Wilson ihre Erzählung nochmal von vorne zu beginnen. Ich richte diese Bitte nicht nur deswegen an Sie, weil mein Freund Dr. Watson den Anfang noch nicht gehört hat, sondern weil ich auch sicher gehen will, dass ich alle Details der ungewöhnlichen Geschichte von Ihren Lippen vernommen habe. Im Allgemeinen kann man sagen, dass ich mich anhand Tausender ähnlicher Fälle, die mir erinnerlich, orientieren kann, wenn ich nur eine vage Schilderung der Ereignisse habe. In diesem Fall aber muss ich sagen, dass die Tatsachen, so weit ich das sehe, einzigartig sind."

Der korpulente Mandant blies, offensichtlich weil er ein bisschen Stolz empfand, die Backen auf und holte eine schmutzigen und zerknitterte Zeitung aus der Innetasche seines Mantels. Als er mit vorwärt geschobenen Kopf die Kolumne mit den Anzeigen überflog, die Zeitung auf seinen Knien ausgebreitet, betrachtete ich den Mann genau und versuchte, nach der Art meines Freundes, aus seiner Kleidung und seiner Erscheinung Schlüsse zu ziehen.

Meine Ermittlungen führten allerdings nicht allzu weit. Unser Besucher vereinte alle Merkmale eine gewöhnlichen, britischen Händlers. Er war dick, selbstgefällig und langsam. Er trug abgenutzte, graue, karierte Hosen, einen nicht allzu sauberen Gehrock, der vorne nicht zugeknöpft war, sowie ein langweiliges Gilet mit einer schweren Albert Kette aus Messing und als Schmuck ein Stück Metall, in dem eine Rechteck ausgestanzt war. Ein verschliessener Zylinder und ausgebleichter schwarzer Mantel mit einem verknitterten Kragen aus Samt lag auf dem Stuhl neben ihm. Insgesamt, ich konnte schauen wie ich wollte, war nichts besonderes an dem Mann außer seinem feuerroten Kopf und dem Ausdruck tiefsten Kummers und Unzufriedenheit in seinem Benehmen.

Dem aufmerksamen Blick Sherlock Holmes war nicht entgangen, was mich beschäftigte und er schüttelte lächelnd mit dem Kopf, als er meinen fragenden Blick sah. "Abgesehen von der offensichtlichen Tatsache, dass er irgendwann mal mit den Händen arbeitete, dass er Schnupftabak nimmt, dass er ein Freimauerer ist, er in China war und in letzter Zeit viel geschrieben hat, kann ich nichts weiter ermitteln."

Mr. Jabez Wilson sprang von seinem Stuhl auf, den Zeigefinger auf der Zeitung, die Augen jedoch auf meinen Freund gerichtet.

"Wie in alles in der Welt haben Sie all das in Erfahrung gebracht, Mr. Holmes?", fragte er. "Woher wissen Sie zum Beispiel, dass ich mit meinen Händen gearbeitet habe. Das ist so wahr, wie das Evangelium, denn ich begann als Schiffszimmermann."

"Ihre Hände, mein Herr. Ihre rechte Hand ist ein bisschen grandezzar als ihre Linke. Sie haben mit ihr gearbeitet und die Muskeln sind besser entwickelt."

"Gut, und der Schnupftabak, die Freimaurerei?"

"Ich will Ihre Intelligenz nicht beleidigen, wenn ich Ihnen erzähle, dass ich dies der Tatsache entnommen habe, dass Sie, ganz entgegen der strengen Regeln Ihrer Loge, Sie als Zeichen Ihrer Zugehörigkeit eine mit einem Bogen und einem Zirkel verzierte Anstecknadel tragen."

"Ach ja, natürlich, das hatte ich vergessen. Und was das Schreiben angeht?"

"Was könnte man sonst aus der Tatsache schließen, dass ihr Ärmelaufschlag über einer Fläche von fünf Inches so glänzt, und dass der linke Ärmel in der Nähe des Ellbogens, wo sie ihn auf den Tisch setzen, so abgewetzt ist."

"Gut, und China?"

"Der Fisch, denn Sie genau über ihrem Handgelenk eintätowiert haben, kann nur in China gemacht worden sein. Ich habe eine kleine Studie über Tätowierungen angefertigt und habe sogar zur letteratura über diesen Gegenstand beigetragen. Dieser Trick die Schuppen der Fische mit einem zarten Rosa zu zeichnen ist typisch für China. Wenn dann noch eine chinesische Münze von ihrer Uhrkette hängt, dann ist es noch eindeutiger."

Mr. Jabez Wilson lachte laut. "Wer hätte das gedacht!", sagte er. "Ich dachte zuerst Sie hätten etwas sehr Intelligentes getan, doch ich sehe jetzt, dass nichts Besonderes dabei ist."

"Ich fange an zu glauben, Watson", sagte Holmes, "dass es falsch von mir war, alles zu erklären. Omne ignotum pro magnifico (alles Unbekannte wird für großartig gehalten), wie sie wissen, und mein armer Ruf wird, so wie die Dinge stehen, Schiffbruch erleiden, wenn ich so treuherzig bin. Können Sie die Anzeige nicht finden, Mr. Wilson?"

"Doch, ich habe sie jetzt", erwiderte er, wobei sein dicker, roter Finger etwa auf der Mitte der Spalte ruhte. "Das ist sie. Damit fing alles an. Lesen Sie es selbst Sir."

Ich nahm ihm die Zeitung aus der Hand und las Folgendes:

"An den Bund der Rothaarigen: Aufgrund des Vermächtnisses des verstorbenen Ezekiah Hopkins, Lebanon, Pensylvania, USA gibt es nun eine neue freie Stelle, die einem Mitglied des Bundes der Rothaarigen einen wöchentlichen Lohn von vier Pounds für eine reine pro forma Tätigkeit garantiert. Alle rothaarigen Männer, körperlich und geistig gesund und älter als einundzwanzig, können sich bewerben. Erscheinen Sie persönlich am Montag um 11 Uhr in Duncan Ross in den Büros der Liga, 7, Pope* s-court, Fleetstreet."

"Was zum Teufel bedeutet das?", rief ich aus, nachdem ich die außergewöhnliche Anzeige zweimal gelesen hatte.

Holmes kicherte, und vergrub sich in seinem Stuhl, wie er es gewöhnlich tat, wenn er guter Laune war. "Das ist ein bisschen jenseits der ausgetretenen Pfade, nicht?", sagte er. "Und nun Mr. Wilson, fangen Sie ganz von vorne an, erzählen Sie etwas über sich selbst, ihre häusliche Situation und die Auswirkungen, welche diese Anzeige auf ihr Schicksal hatte. Sie Doktor, notieren erstmal den Namen der Zeitung und das Datum."

"Es handelt sich um The Morning Chronicle vom 27. April, 1890. Gerade vor zwei Monaten."

"Sehr gut. Weiter, Mr. Wilson?"

"Nun, es ist genau so, wie ich es ihnen gerade erzählt habe, Mr. Sherlock Holmes", sagte Jabez Wilson und wische sich die Stirn ab, "ich habe ein kleines Pfandhaus in Coburg-Square, in der Nähe der City. Es ist kein großes Geschäft und in den letzten Jahren hat es gerade gereicht, um meinen Lebensunterhalt zu bestreiten. Früher hatte ich gewöhnlich zwei Gehilfen, doch heute habe ich nur noch einen. Es würde mir sogar schwer fallen, ihn zu bezahlen, doch er ist bereit, für die Hälfte zu arbeiten, um das Geschäft kennen zu lernen."

"Was ist der Name dieses entgegenkommenden Jungen?", fragte Sherlock Holmes.

"Sein Name ist Vincent Spaulding und er ist nicht mehr so jung. Es ist schwer, sein Alter zu schätzen. Ich könnte mir keinen aufgeweckteren Gehilfen vorstellen, Mr. Holmes. Ich weiß sehr wohl, dass er mehr erreichen könnte und auch das doppelte verdienen könnte, was ich ihm bezahlen kann. Doch wenn er zufrieden ist, warum sollte ich ihm irgendwelche Ideen in den Kopf setzen?"

"Das stimmt, warum sollten Sie dies tun? Sie scheinen sehr viel Glück gehabt zu haben mit diesem Angestellten, der unterhalb seines Marktpreises arbeitet. Das ist unter den Angestellten in diesem Alter nicht alltäglich. Ich glaube kaum, dass ihr Gehilfe nicht ebenso interessant ist, wie ihre Anzeige."

"Nun, er hat auch seine Schwächen", sagte Mr. Wilson. "Noch gab es jemanden, der so vernarrt in die Photography war. Ständig schnappt er sich seine Kamera, wenn er was für seine Bildung tun müsste. Dann taucht er im Keller ab wie ein Hase in seinem Loch um seine Bilder zu entwickeln. Das ist seine größte Schwäche. Doch im Großen und Ganzen, ist er ein guter Arbeiter. Er hat keine Laster."

"Er lebt immer noch bei Ihnen, vermute ich?"

"Ja Sir. Er und ein vierzehnjähriges Mädchen, das einfache Mahlzeiten zubereitet und sauber macht. Das sind alle, die bei mir wohnen, denn ich bin Witwer und hatte nie eine Familie. Wir leben sehr zurückgezogen, Sir, wir drei. Wir haben ein Dach über dem Kopf und genug, um unsere Schulden zu bezahlen, wenn wir nichts weiter tun.

Allein die Anzeige hat uns ein bisschen aus der Ruhe gebracht. Genau heute vor acht Wochen kam Spaulding ins Büro mit genau dieser Zeitung in seiner Hand und sagte:

"Bei Gott, Mr. Wilson, ich wünschte ich wäre rothaarig."

"Warum das?", fragte ich.

"Weil es hier hier noch eine Anzeige für eine freie Stelle des Bundes der Rothaarigen gibt", sagte er. "Das bringt jedem, der sie bekommt ein kleines Vermögen ein und ich sehe, dass es mehr freie Stellen als Leute gibt, so dass die Vermögensverwalter am Ende sind mit ihrem Latein und nicht mehr wissen, was sie mit dem Geld machen sollen. Wenn doch nur mein Haar die Farbe ändern würde. Das wäre eine schöne Krippe für mich, in die ich mich nur hineinzulegen bräuchte.

"Warum? Um was handelt es sich?", fragte ich. Sie sehen Mr. Holmes, dass ich ein ganz und gar häuslicher Mann bin und da mein Geschäft zu mir kommt und ich nicht zu ihm gehen muss, gab es Wochen, bei denen ich keinen Fuß vor die Tür setzte. So wusste ich wenig von dem, was draußen vor sich ging und war immer über ein paar Neuigkeiten erfreut.

"Haben Sie jemals vom Bund der Rothaarigen gehört", fragte er mit offenen Augen.

"Nie."

"Das wundert mich, denn sie kämen doch selbst für eine der offenen Stellen in Frage."

"Und was sind diese wert?"

"Ach, nur ein paar Hundert im Jahr, doch die Arbeit ist leicht und überschneidet sich nicht mit anderen Geschäften, die man nebenher noch haben kann."

"Nun, Sie können sich leicht vorstellen, dass ich die Ohren spitzte, denn das Geschäft lief schon seit Jahren nicht gut und ein paar Hundert mehr im Jahr wären ganz praktisch."

"Erzählen Sie mir alles darüber", sagte ich.

"Nun", sagte er und zeigte mir die Anzeige, "sie sehen selber, dass der Bund eine freie Stelle hat und da steht die Adresse, an die man sich wenden muss, um mehr zu erfahren. So weit ich weiß, wurde die Liga von einem amerikanischen Millionär gegründet, Ezekiah Hopkins, der sehr eigen war. Er war selbst rothaarig und hegte eine große Zuneigung für alle Rothaarigen. Als er starb, wurde bekannt, dass er sein ganzes riesiges Vermögen in die Hände von Treuhändern gegeben hatte, mit der Maßgabe, dass alle Zinsen aus diesem Vermögen dazu verwendet werden, Jobs für rothaarige Männer zu schaffen. Nach allem was ich gehört habe, werden sie sehr gut bezahlt und es gibt nur wenig zu tun."

"Aber", entgegnete ich, "es gibt wohl Millionen von rothaarigen Männern, die sich bewerben würden."

"Nicht so viele, wie Sie denken", antwortete er. "Tatsächlich beschränkt es sich auf Londoner und erwachsene Männer. Dieser Amerikaner hatte in seiner Jugend in London begonnen und wollte der alten Stadt etwas Gutes tun. Weiter habe ich gehört, dass es zwecklos ist, sich zu bewerben, wenn ihr Haar von leichtem oder dunklen Rot ist oder sonst irgendetwas anderes als wirkliches, leuchtendes, flammendes, glühendes Rot. Wenn sie sich also jetzt bewerben wollen, brauchen Sie nur hinzugehen. Doch vielleicht ist es für Sie, wegen ein paar Hundert Pfund, nicht der Mühe wert, sich auf den Weg zu machen."

"Nun. Es ist eine Tatsache Gentleman, wie Sie selber sehen können, dass mein Haar von einer vollen und intensiven Farbe ist, so dass es mir schien, dass ich, sollte eine Auswahl nötig sein, so große Chancen hätte wie jeder andere Mann, den ich jemals getroffen habe. Vincent Spaulding schien soviel darüber zu wissen, dass ich dachte, er könnte sich als nützlich erweisen. Ich befahl ihm also die Rolläden für heute zu schließen und sogleich mit mir zu kommen. Er war sehr erbaut darüber, einen Tag Ferien zu haben. Wir machten also das Geschäft zu und machten uns auf den Weg zu der in der Anzeige angegebenen Adresse.

"Ich denke nicht, dass ich jemals wieder etwas Vergleichbares sehen werde, Mr. Holmes. Von Norden, Süden, Osten und Westen war jeder Mann, dessen Haar eine rötliche Tönung hatte zur City gekommen um auf die Anzeige zu antworten. Fleet Street war vollgestopt mit rothaarigen Leuten und Pop' s Street sah aus wie ein mit Orangen beladener Wagen eines Straßenhändlers. Ich hätte nie geglaubt, dass im ganzen Land so viele Rothaarige gibt, wie jetzt durch diese eine Anzeige zusammengeführt worden waren. Es gab alle Arten von Farben, strohfarben, zitronenfarben, orangefarben, rot wie Ziegelstein, rot wie ein irisher Setter, rot wie Leber, rot wie Ton. Doch wie Spaulding gesagt hatte, gab es nicht viele, die einen wirklich glänzenden, feurigen Farbton hatten. Als ich sah, wie viele bereits warteten, hätte ich fast resigniert aufgegeben. Doch Spaulding wollte davon nichts hören. Wie er es schaffte weiß ich nicht, doch er drückte, zog und stieß bis er mich durch die Menge hindurch- und die die Treppen, die zum Büro führten, hinaufgeschleust hatte. Auf der Treppe stand eine Doppelreihe. Einige, die voller Hoffnung hinaufgingen und andere, die niedergeschlagen herunterkamen. Wir schlängelten uns so gut es ging hindurch und befanden uns bald im Büro."

"Ihr Erlebnis war sehr unterhaltsam", bemerkte Holmes, als sein Mandant innehielt und sein Gedächtnis mit einer großen Prise Schnupftabak erfrischte. "Ich bitte Sie, fahren Sie mit Ihrer interessanten Schilderung fort."

"In dem Büro war, außer ein paar Holzstühlen und einem Tisch, hinter dem ein kleiner Mann saß, dessen Kopf noch röter war als der meinige, nichts. Er sagte ein paar Worte zu jedem Kandidaten, der hereinkam und fand dann immer einen Fehler, der ihn disqualifizierte. Eine Stelle zu bekommen schien also doch nicht so eine leichte Angelegenheit zu sein. Als wir jedoch an die Reihe kamen, war der kleine Mann mir gegenüber milder gestimmt als allen anderen gegenüber. er schloss die Tür, als wir hereinkamen, so dass er alleine mit uns sprechen konnte.

"Das ist Mr. Jabez Wilson", sagte mein Gehilfe, "und er ist bereit, die Arbei im Bund anzunehmen."

"Und er ist hierfür sehr geeignet", antwortete der andere. "Er hat alles, was hierfür benötigt wird. Ich kann mich nicht erinnern, jemals etwas so Feines gesehen zu haben." Er trat einen Schritt zurück, neigte den Kopf zur pagina und starrte mein Haar an, bis ich fast verlegen wurde. Dann stürzte er plötzlich nach vorne, drückte meine Hand und gratulierte mir warmherzig zu meinem Erfolg.

"Es wäre ungerecht zu zögern", sagte er. "Sie werden jedoch verstehen, dessen bin ich mir sicher, dass ich zuerst sicher gehen will". Mit diesen Worten griff er mit beiden Händen in meine Haare zerrte daran, bis ich vor Schmerz aufschrie. "Sie haben Wasser in Ihren Augen", sagte er zu mir, als er mich losließ. "Ich stelle fest, dass alles so ist, wie es sein sollte. Wir müssen jedoch vorsichtig sein, denn wir wurden schon zweimal durch Perrücken und einmal durch Färben betrogen. Ich könnte Ihne Geschichten über Schuhcreme erzählen, die sie mit Ekel über die menschliche Natur erfüllen würden." Er ging zum Fenster und rief so laut er konnte, dass die Stelle besetzt ist. Ein enttäuschtes Raunen kam von unten herauf und die Menge ging nach allen pagina n auseinander, bis kein einziger roter Schopf außer meinem und dem des Managers mehr zu sehen war.

"Mein Name ist", sagte er, "Mr. Duncan Ros. Ich bin selbst einer der Begünstigten des von unserem noblen Wohltätter hinterlassenen Fonds. Sind Sie verheiratet Mr. Wilson? Haben Sie Familie?"

"Ich antwortete, dass dies nicht der Fall sei."

"Sein Gesicht verzog sich sofort."

"Meine Güte, sagte er ernst, "das ist wirklich schlecht! Ich bedauere, Sie das sagen zu hören. Der Fond dient der Fortpflanzung und Verbreitung der Rothaarigen und ihrer Erhaltung. Es ist sehr ungünstig, dass Sie Junggeselle sind."

"Mein Gesicht wurde länger bei diesen Worten, Mr. Holmes, denn ich dachte, dass ich die Stelle nicht erhalten würde. Doch nachdem er einige Zeit darüber nachgedacht hatte, sagte er, dass alles in Ordnung wäre."

"Hätte es sich um jemand anderes gehandelt", sagte er, "dann wäre das ein ernsthaftes Problem gewesen, doch wir müssen bei einem Mann, der einen Kopf mit solchem Haar hat, ein Auge zudrücken. Wann können Sie beginnen, ihre neuen Aufgaben zu erfüllen?"

"Nun, das ist ein bisschen schwierig, denn ich leite schon ein Geschäft", sagte er.

"Oh, kümmern Sie sich nicht darum, Mr. Wilson", sagte Vincent Spaulding. "Ich werde in der Lage sein, mich darum zu kümmern."

"Was wäre die Arbeitszeit?", fragte ich.

"von zehn bis zwei."

"Das Geschäft eines Pfandleihers wird meistens in den Abendstunden erledigt, Mr. Holmes, vor allem am Donenrstag und Freitag, den Tagen vor dem Zahltag. Es wäre also günstig für mich, noch etwas am Morgen hinzuverdienen zu können. Davon abgesehen, wusste ich, dass mein Gehilfe ein fähiger Mann war und er sich um alles was sich ergibt kümmern würde."

"Das würde mir gut passen", sagte ich. "Und die Bezahlung?"

"Vier Pfund die Woche."

"Und die Arbeit?"

"Lediglich eine Formalie."

"Was nennen Sie lediglich eine Formalie."

"Nun, Sie müssen die ganze Zeit im Büro, oder zumindest im Gebäude sein. Wenn Sie es verlassen, büßen Sie die Stelle für immer ein. Die Bestimmung ist, was dies angeht, sehr klar. Sie verstoßen gegen die Regeln, wenn sie sich während dieser Zeit vom Büro entfernen."

"Das sind nur vier Stunden am Tag und ich denke nicht, dass ich es verlassen werde", sagte ich.

"Keine Entschuldigung wird etwas nützen", sagte Mr. Duncan Ross, "weder Krankheit, noch geschäftliche Dinge, noch irgendetwas anderes. Sie müssen hier sein, andernfalls verlieren Sie Ihre Platz."

"Und die Arbeit?"

"Es handelt sich darum, die Encyclopedia Britannica abzuschreiben." Der erste Band steht in diesem Regal. Sie müssen ihre eigene Tinte, Federhalter und Papier mitbringen, doch wir liefern den Tisch und den Stuhl. Werden Sie morgen bereit sein?"

"Sicher", antwortete ich.

"Dann Auf Wiedersehen, Mr. Jabez Wilson. Ich möchte Ihnen nochmals für die wichtige Position, die zu erhalten Sie das Glück hatten, beglückwünschen." Er komplimentierte mich aus dem Raum und ich ging, begleitet von meinem Gehilfen, heim. Ich wusste nicht, was ich sagen oder tun sollte und freute mich sehr über mein Glück."

"Dann dachte ich den ganzen Tag über die Angelegenheit nach und abends war ich dann wieder missmutig. Ich war nämlich schlussendlich zu dem Schluss gekommen, dass dei ganze Angelegenheit eine große Täuschung oder Betrug sein musste, doch konnte ich mir keine Klarheit darüber verschaffen, was dessen Ziel war. Es schien ein Irrwitz zu sein, dass jemand einen solchen Willen äußern könnte, oder dass jemand für etwas so Einfaches, wie die Encyclopedia Britannica abzuschreiben, eine solche Summe bezahlen würde. Vincent Spaulding tat alles, um mich aufzuheitern, doch als es Zeit war ins Bett zu gehen, hatte ich beschlossen, von der ganzen Sache Abstand zu nehmen. Am nächsten Morgen jedoch, beschloss ich, es mir trotzdem mal anzuschauen. Ich kaufte also ein Tintenfass für einen Penny und mit einem Federhalter so wie sieben Bögen Papier in britischem Format macht ich mich auf den Weg zu Popes-Court. "

"Zu meiner Überraschung und Freude war alles so in Ordnung wie nur möglich. Der Tisch war für mich aufgestellt worden und Mr. Duncan Ross war da und zu überprüfen, dass ich mich auch wirklich an die Arbeit machte. Er hieß mich mit dem Buchstaben A beginnen und ließ mich allein, kam aber von Zeit zu Zeit herein, um nachzuschauen, ob mit mir alles in Ordnung sei. Um zwei Uhr wünschte er mir einen Guten Tag, machte mir ein Kompliment über die Menge, die ich geschrieben hatte und schloss die Tür des Büros hinter mir.

So ging das einen Tag nach dem anderen, Mr. Holmes, und am Samstag kam der Manager herein und zählte vier goldene Zwanzigshillingmünzen für meine wöchentliche Arbeitsleistung auf den Tisch. Genau so geschah es nächte Woche und gleichermaßen die folgende Woche. Jeden Morgen kam ich um zehn und ging um zwei. Nach einiger Zeit kam Duncan Ross nur noch einmal am Morgen herein und nach einer Weile kam er gar nicht mehr. Ich jedoch wagte es nicht, den Raum auch nur für einen Moment zu verlassen, denn ich war nicht sicher, ob er kommen würde und der Posten war so günstig für mich, dass ich nicht riskieren wollte, ihn zu verlieren.

So vergingen acht Wochen. Ich hatte über Äbte, Bogenschießen, Rüstung, Architekture und Attika geschrieben und hoffte instandig in nicht allzu langer Zeit zu dem Buchstaben B zu gelangen. Das Papier kostete mich ein bisschen was und ich hatte schon fast ein ganzes Regal mit meinen Schreibarbeiten gefüllt. Dann endete das Geschäft plötzlich."

"Endete?"

"Ja Sir. Und zwar genau an jenem Morgen. Ich ging wie gewöhnlich um zehn Uhr zur Arbeit, doch die Tür war zu und abgeschlossen. An der Tür hing eine viereckige Karte aus Pappe, die in der Mitte mit einer Reißzwecke angenagelt war. Das ist sie, sie können Sie selber lesen."

Er hob ein Stück weißer Pappe, etwa von der grandezza eines Blatt Briefpapiere, in die Höhe. Dort stand geschrieben.

"Der Bund der Rothaarigen ist aufgelöst worden, Oktober, 1890".

Sherlock Holmes und ich betrachteten diese schroff formulierte Nachricht und das reuevolle Gesicht dahinter. Schließlich jedoch überwogen die komischen Aspekte alle anderen Erwägungen und wir mussten laut lachen.

"Ich kann nicht erkennen, was daran lustig sein soll", schrie unser Mandant, und wurde rot bis in die Wurzeln seines feurigen Kopfes. "Wenn Ihnen außer Lachen nichts einfällt, kann ich auch irgendwo anders hingehen."

"Nein, nein", schrie Holmes, und ließ sich zurück in den Sessel fallen, von dem er sich halb erhoben hatte. "Ich möchte mir Ihren Fall auf keinen Fall entgehen lassen. Er ist auf erfrischende Art und Weise außergewöhnlich. Doch hat er, bitte entschuldigen Sie, wenn ich das so sage, auch ein bisschen komisch. Ich bitte Sie, schildern Sie, was sie getan haben, als Sie den Zettel an der Tür fanden?"

"Ich war verwirrt Sir. Wusste nicht, was ich tun sollte. Dann fragte ich in den Büros nebenan nach, doch nirgends schien man etwas davon zu wissen. Dann ging ich zum Verwalter, einem Buchhalter, der im Erdgeschoss wohnt und fragte ihn, was mit der Bund der Rothaarigen passiert sei. Er sagte, er habe von so einer Vereinigung nie etwas gehört. Dann fragte ich ihn, wo Mr. Duncan Ross wäre. Er antwortete mir, dass der Name neu für ihn sei."

"Der Mann", sagte ich, "von Nummer 4."
"Wie, der rothaarige Mann?"

"Ja."

"Oh", sagte er, "sein Name ist William Morris. Er ist ein kleiner Rechtsanwalt und nutzte meinen Raum für eine kurze Zeit bis seine eigenen Geschäftsräume fertig waren. Gestern ist er umgezogen."

"Wo kann ich ihn finden?"

"In seinem neuen Büro. Er hat mir sogar die Adresse gesagt. Ja, 17, King Edward Street, in der Nähe von Paul' s."

"Ich machte mich auf den Weg, Mr. Holmes, aber als in der bezeichneten Adresse ankam, war es ein Betrieb zur Herstellung künstlicher Kniescheiben und niemand dort hatte jemals von Mr. William Morris oder Mr. Duncan Ross gehört."

"Und was haben Sie dann gemacht?", fragte Holmes.

"Ich ging nach Hause, also zum Saxe-Coburg-Square und fragte meinen Gehilfen um Rat. Doch er konnte mir überhaupt nicht helfen. Er konnte mir nur sagen, dass ich schon Nachricht auf dem Postweg erhalten würde, ich müsste nur warten. Doch das reichte mir nicht, Mr. Holmes. Ich wollte einen solchen Posten nicht kampflos aufgeben. Da ich gehört habe, dass sie so freundlich sind, armen Leuten wie mir zu helfen, bin ich direkt zu Ihnen gekommen."

"Das war eine weise Entscheidng", sagte Holmes. "Ihr Fall ist überaus bemerkenswert und ich werde mich glücklich schätzen, einen genaueren Blick darauf zu werfen. Aus dem was sie erzählen, entnehme ich, dass vielleicht schwerer wiegende Dinge damit in Zusammenhang stehen, als es auf den ersten Blick den Anschein hat."

"Sie sind schlimm genug", sagte Mr. Jabez Wilson. "Ich habe vier Pfund die Woche verloren."

"Was Sie persönlich angeht", bemerkte Holmes, "kann ich nicht erkennen, dass Sie sich wegen des Bundes zu beklagen hätten. Ganz im Gegenteil, Sie sind, soweit ich das verstanden haben, ungefähr dreißig Pfund reicher, ohne von den detailreichen Kenntnissen zu sprechen, die Sie über all die Dinge erlangt haben, die mit A beginnen. Sie haben durch ihn nichts verloren."

"Nein Sir. Aber ich will mehr über sie wissen, wer sie sind und was das Ziel ihres Streiches, angenommen um einen solchen handelt es sich, war. Das war ein ziemlich teurer Spaß für sie, denn er hat sie zweiunddreißig Pfund gekostet."

"Wir werden uns bemühen, dies für Sie herauszufinden. Doch zuerst ein oder zwei Fragen, Mr. Wilson. Der Gehilfe, der zuerst Ihre Aufmerksamkeit auf die Anzeige lenkte, wie lange war er schon bei Ihnen?"

"Etwa einen Monat."

"Wie ist er zu Ihnen gekommen?"

"Als Antwort auf eine Anzeige."

"War er der Einzige Bewerber?"

"Nein, ich hatte etwa ein Dutzend."

"Warum haben Sie ihn gewählt?"

"Weil er geschickt und billig war."

"Genau genommen die Hälfte des üblichen Lohns."

"Ja."

"Wie ist er, dieser Vincent Spaulding?"

"Klein, korpulent, gewand in seinen Bewegungen, keine Haare im Gesicht, obwohl er nicht jünger als dreißig ist. Er hat einen weißen Fleck auf der Stirn, die von einer Säure verursacht wurde."

"Holmes richtete sich in seinem Stuhl auf, ziemlich erregt. "Das hab ich mir gedacht", sagte er. "Haben Sie jemals bemerkt, dass seine Augen Ohrlöcher für Ohrringe haben?"

"Ja Sir. Er sagte mir, dass ein Zigeuner dies getan habe, als er noch ein Junge war. "

"Hm", sagte Holmes und versank in seinen Gedanken. "Ist er noch bei Ihnen?"

"Ja Sir. Ich habe ihn gerade verlassen."

"Wurde ihr Geschäft in Ihrer Abwesenheit weiter geführt?"

"Es gibt nichts zu klagen Sir. Am Morgen gibt es dort nicht viel zu tun."

"Das reicht, Mr. Wilson. Ich werde mich glücklich schätzen, Ihnen in zwei Tagen Bescheid geben zu können. Heute ist Samstag und ich hoffe, dass wir am Montag zu einer Lösung gekommen sind."

"Gut Watson", sagte Holmes, als der Besucher uns verlassen hatte, "was schließen Sie aus dem ganzen?"

"Ich entnehme all dem gar nichts", erwiderte ich ehrlich. "Das ist ein sehr mysteriöser Fall."

"Als allgemeine Regel", sagte Holmes, "je bizarrer etwas ist, desto weniger mysteriös erweist es sich schließlich. Es sind die Verbrechen, die Sie als gewöhnlich und alltäglich bezeichnen würden, die am geheimnisvollsten sind, ganz so wie ein alltägliches Gesicht am allerschwierigsten zu identifizieren ist. Doch im muss mich sofort um diese Angelegenheit kümmern. "

"Was gedenken Sie zu tun?", fragte ich.

"Rauchen", antwortete er. "Es ist ein drei Pfeifen Problem und ich bitte Sie, fünfzig Minuten lang nicht zu sprechen". Er kauerte sich in seinem Sessel zusammen, zog die Knie bis zu seiner Adlernase empor und verharrte mit geschlossenen Augen, während seine Tonpfeife wie der Schnabel eines merkwürdigen Vogels nach vorne ragte. Ich war zu dem Schluss gekommen, dass er eingeschlafen war und auch ich nickte mit dem Kopf, als er plötzlich von seinem Stuhl mit dem Schwung eines Mannes, der gerade eine Entscheidung getroffen hatte aufsprang und seine Pfeife auf den Kaminsims legte.

"Heute Nachmittag spielt Sarasate (zur damaligen Zeit berühmter, spanischer Komponist) in der St. James Hall", bemerkte er. "Was denken Sie darüber, Watson? Können Ihre Patienten Sie für ein paar Stunden entbehren?"

"Ich habe heute nichts zu tun. Meine Praxis beansprucht mich nicht sehr."

"Dann setzen Sie Ihren Hut auf und kommen Sie. Ich gehe zuerst durch die City und unterwegs können wir zu Abend essen. Ich sehe das ein großer parte des Programms deutsche musica ist, was mehr nach meinem Geschmack ist als italienische oder französische. Sie ist nach Innen gerichtet und ich will nachdenken. Kommen Sie!"

Wir nahmen die Metro bis nach Aldersgate, danach brachte uns ein kurzer passegiata nach Saxe-Coburg Square, der Schauplatz der einzigartigen Geschichte, die wir heute morgen gehört hatten. Es war ein winziger, kleiner, schäbiger-vornehmer Platz, wo vier Reihen schmudeliger, zweistöckiger Ziegelhäuser auf eine kleine umzäunte Anlage schauten, wo ein Rasen aus unkrautdurchwachsenem Gras und ein paar Sträucher verblühter Lorbeeren hart gegen rauchgeschwängerte und unangenehme Luft ankämpften. Drei goldene Bälle (Symbol für Pfandleihaus) und ein braunes Brett auf dem in weißen Buchstaben Jabez Wilson geschrieben stand, an einem Eckhaus, kündenten von dem Ort, wo der rothaarige Mandant sein Geschäft betrieb. Sherlock blieb, mit geneigtem Kopf, vor dem Haus stehen und schaute es sich, wobei seine Augen durch seine zusammegekniffenen Lidern hindurchstrahlten. Dann ging er langsam die Straße hinauf, dann wieder hinunter bis zur Ecke, während er immer noch aufmerksam auf die Häuser schaute. Schließlich kehrte er zu dem Pfandhaus zurück und ging dann, nachdem er mit seinem Stock zwei oder dreimal kräftig auf das Pflaster geschlagen hatte, zur Tür und klopfte. Es wurde sofort von einem gutaussehenden, glattrasierten jungen Mann geöffnet, der ihn bat einzutreten.

"Danke", sagte Holm, "ich wollte nur fragen, wie sie von hier zur Strand (Straße in London) gehen würden."

"Die dritte rechts, die vierte links", antwortete der Gehilfe sofort und schloss die Tür.

"Ein schlauer Bursche ist das", bemerkte Holmes, als wir weggingen. "Meiner Meinung nach ist er der viertintelligenteste Mann in London und was Kühnheit angeht, weiß ich nicht ob er nicht Anspruch auf den dritten Platz erheben kann. Ich wusste schon vorher etwas über ihn."

"Offensichtlich", sagte ich, "Mr. Wilson Gehilfe hat wohl einiges mit dem Mysterium des Bundes der Rothaarigen zu tun. Ich bin sicher, Sie haben ihn nur nach dem Weg gefragt, damit Sie einen Blick auf ihn werfen können."

"Nicht ihn."

"Was dann?"

"Die Kniee seiner Hosen."

"Und was haben Sie gesehen?"

"Dass, was zu sehen ich erwartet habe."

"Warum haben Sie auf das Pflaster geschlagen?"

"Mein lieber Doktor, im Moment ist die Zeit, Beobachtungen zu machen, nicht um zu reden. Wir sind Spione in Feindesland. Wir wissen etwas über Saxe-Coburg Square. Lassen Sie uns jetzt die Gebiete erkunden, die dahinter liegen."

Die Straße, in der wir uns befanden als wir Ecke der Saxe-Coburg Square bogen war so unterschiedlich von dieser, wie die Vorderseite eines Bildes zu dessen Rücken. Es war einer dieser Hauptschlagadern, welche den Verkehr der City nach Norden oder Westen lenkt. Die Straße war vollgestopft mit dem riesigen Handelsstrom der in einer doppelten Spur nach Innen und Außen strömte, während die Gehsteige schwarz waren von dem eiligen Schwarm an Fußgängern. Als wir auf die Reihe mit den feinen Geschäften und würdevollen Geschäftsgebäuden schauten konnten wir uns kaum vorstellen, auf der anderen pagina in die fade und träge Straße mündete, die wir gerade verlassen hatten.

"Lassen Sie mich sehen", sagte Holmes, von der Ecke aus die lange Reihe hinunterblickend, "Ich will mir nur die Reihenfolge dieser Häuser einprägen. Eine genaue Vorstellung von London zu haben, ist eines meiner Hobbys. Da ist Mortimer, der Tabakladen, der kleine Zeitungsladen, die Niederlassung in der City von Coburg und der Suburban Bank, das vegetarische Restaurant und die Abteilung Kutschenbau von McFarlane. Das bringt uns zum nächsten Block. Und nun Doktor ist unsere Arbeit getan. Es ist nun also an der Zeit, ein bisschen Spaß zu haben. Ein Sandwich und eine Tasse Kaffee und dann in das Land der Violine, wo alles sanft, feinsinnig und harmonisch ist. Wo es keine rothaarigen Kunden gibt, die uns mit ihren Rätseln ärgern."

Mein Freund war ein enthusiastischer musicaer. Er konnte nicht nur passabel spielen, sondern war auch ein Komponist von erstaunlichen Meriten. Er saß den ganzen Nachmittag vollkommen glücklich im Parkett und ließ seine langen, dünnen Finger im Takt der musica kreisen. Sein lächelndes Gesicht und seine matten, verträumten Augen hatten mit Sherlock Holmes, dem Schnüffler, Holmes dem Gnadenlosen, dem Scharfsinnigen, dem energischen Jäger der Verbrecher so wenig zu tun, wie man sich nur vorstellen kann. In seinem Wesen brachen immer wieder seine zwei Seelen durch und seine extreme Genauigkeit und Aufgewecktheit waren, wie ich oft dachte, eine Reaktion auf die poetische und kontemplative Stimmung die manchmal in ihm vorherrschte.

Die Schwingungen seiner Natur führten ihn von einem Zustand extremer Hingabe zur verzehrenden Tatkraft und ich wusste sehr wohl, dass er immer dann so wirklich fabelhaft war, wenn er ganze Tage mit seinen Improvisationen und seinen alten Bücher in seinem Sessel verbracht hatte. In diesem Momenten erwachte plötzlich ihn ihm der Jagdinstinkt und seine brilliante Fähigkeit, zu Kombinieren grenzte dann an Intuition. Zumindest diejenigen, die mit seinen Methoden nicht vertraut waren, betrachteten ihn mit demselben Erstaunen, mit der man einen Menschen betrachtet, dessen Wissen nicht dem der anderen Sterblichen glich. Als ich ihn an diesem Nachmittag in der St.James Hall so hingebungsvoll der musica lauschen sah, spürte ich, dass für die, die er jagen wollte, eine schwere Zeit angebrochen war.

"Sie möchten sich nach Hause gehen Doktor", bemerkte er, als wir hinausgingen.

"Ja, es ist Zeit."

"Und ich habe noch ein paar Dinge zu erledigen, die einige Stunden dauern. Die Angelegenheit in der Coburg Square ist ernst."

"Ernst warum?"

"Ein beachtliches Verbrechen wird ausgeheckt. Ich habe allen Grund zu der Annahme, dass wir rechtzeitig da sein müssen, um es zu stoppen. Da heute Samstag ist, ist alles komplizierter. Ich werde heute nacht ihre Hilfe brauchen."

"Um wieviel Uhr?"

"Zehn Uhr wird früh genug sein."

"Dann werde ich um 10 Uhr in Baker Street sein."

"Sehr gut Doktor. Ich sage ihnen noch Doktor, dass es ein bisschen gefährlich wird, seien Sie also so gut, und stecken Sie ihren Armee Revolver in ihre Tasche." Er winkte mit der Hand, drehte sich auf dem Absatz um und verschwand von einem Moment auf den anderen in der Menge.

Ich glaube ich bin nicht dämmlicher als meine Nachbarn, hatte ich jedoch mit Sherlock Holmes zu tun, dann bedrückte mich das Gefühl, beschränkt zu sein.
Ich hatte gehört, was er gehört hatte, hatte gesehen, was er gesehen hatte, doch seinen Worten konnte man entnehmen, dass er nicht nur deutlich sah, was vorgefallen ist, sondern auch das, was geschehen wird, während für mich die ganze Angelegenheit noch verwirrend und grotesk war. Als ich nach Hause in die Kensington fuhr, dachte ich über alles nach, beginnend mit der ungewöhnlichen Geschichte des rothaarigen Kopierers der Encyclopedia bis zum Besucht in der Saxe Coburg Square und die unheilkündenen Worte mit welchen er sich von mir trennte. Worin bestand seine nächtlich Exkursion und warum sollte ich mich bewaffnen? Wohin werden wir gehen und was werden wir tun? Holms hatte mir bedeutet, dass dieses glattgesichtige Gehilfe des Pfandleihers ein bedeutender Mann war, ein Mann, der vielleicht ein hintergründigeres Spiel spielte. Ich versuchte es zu erraten, gab aber entmutigt auf und ließ es auf sich beruhigen, bis die Nacht die Erklärung bringen würde.

Es war viertel nach neun, als ich von zu Hause los ging. Ich überquerte den Park, die Oxford Street und erreichte Baker Street. Zwei Einspänner standen vor der Tür und als ich in den Flur trat, hörte ich von oben Stimmen. Ich betrat den Raum und fand Holmes in einem angeregten Gespräch mit zwei Männern, von denen einer Peter Jones war, der Polizeibeamte, während der andere ein großer, griesgrämig blickender Mann war mit einem glänzenden Hut und einem beeindruckenden Gehrock.

"Ha! Unsere Gruppe ist vollständig", sagte Holmes, knöpfte sich seine kugelsichere Weste zu, und nahm die schwere Reitpeitsche aus dem Regal. "Watson, ich denke Mr. Jones von Scotland Yard kennen Sie schon? Lassen Sie mich Ihnen Mr. Merryweather vorstellen, der bei diesem nächtlichen Abenteuer unser Begleiter sein wird."

"Wir jagen wieder in Paaren wie Sie sehen Doktor", sagte Jones mit dem ihm eigenen ironischen Unterton. "Unser Freund hier ein ein prächtiger Mann, wenn es darum geht, eine Jagd zu beginnen. Alles war er braucht ist ein alter Hund, um es zu Ende zu bringen."

"Ich hoffe, dass es sich am Ende nicht zeigt, dass wir einem Phantom hinterhergejagt sind", bemerkte Mr. Merryweather düster.

"Sie können Mr. Holmes vertrauen, Sir", sagte der Polizeibeamte hochmütig. "Er hat seine speziellen kleinen Methoden, die, er möge verzeihen, wenn ich es so sage, ein bisschen sehr theoretisch und phantastisch sind, doch hat er alles, was ein Detektiv braucht. Es ist nicht zuviel gesagt, dass er ein- oder zweimal, wie zum Beispiel in der Mordsache Sholto und dem Schatz von Agra, er näher an der Wahrheit war, als die Polizeibeamten."

"Nun, wenn Sie es sagen, Mr. Jones, dann hat es seine Richtigkeit", sagte der Fremde respektvoll. "Dennoch vermisse ich meinen Kartensatz. Das ist der erste Samstagabend seit siebenundzwanzig Jahren, dass ich nicht Karten spiele."

"Ich denke sie werden sehen", sagte Sherlock Holmes, "dass Sie heute nacht um einen höheren Einsatz spielen, als Sie es jemals getan haben, und dass das Spiel auch aufrender sein wird. Für Sie Mr. Merryweather, ist der Einsatz ungefähr dreißig Tausend Pfund und für Sie Jones, ist es der Mann, denn sie gerne ergreifen würden."

"John Clay, der Mörder, Dieb, Betrüger und Fälscher. Er ist ein junger Mann, Mr. Merryweather, doch er steht an der Spitze seiner Zunft und ihm mehr als jedem anderen Kriminellen in London würde ich gerne Handschellen anlegen. Er ist ein bemerkenswerter Mann, dieser junge John Clay. Sein Großvater war ein Herzog von königlichem Blut und er war in Eton und Oxford. Sein Gehirn ist so clever wie seine Finger, und obwohl wir immer wieder auf seine Spuren stießen, konnten wir ihn nie fassen. Diese Woche wird er in ein Haus in Schottland einbrechen können, und in der nächsten sammelt er Geld für den Bau eines Waisenhaus in Cornwall. Ich bin ihm schon seit Jahren auf den Fersen, doch habe ich ihn noch nie gesehen."

"Ich hoffe ich werde das Vergnügen haben, ihn Ihnen heute abend zu präsentieren. Ein-, zweimal hat Mr. John Clay auch schon meine Wege gekreuzt und ich stimme Ihnen zu, dass er an der Spitze seines Berufes steht. Es ist jedoch nach zehn und Zeit, dass wir uns auf den Weg machen. Wenn Sie beide den ersten Einspänner nehmen, werde Watson und ich Ihnen im zweiten folgen. "

Sherlock Holmes war nicht sehr gesprächig während der langen Fahrt. Er ließ sich in den Sitz fallen und summte die Melodien, die er am Nachmittag gehört hatte. Wir fuhren ratternd durch ein endloses Labyrinth von Straßenlampen, die durch Gaslampen beleuchtet wurden, bis wir schließlich in Farringdon Street ankamen.

"Wir sind nun fast da", bemerkte mein Freund. "Merryweather ist ein Bank Direktor und persönlich an der Angelegenheit interessiert. Ich dachte es wäre gut, auch Jones bei uns zu haben. Er ist kein schlechter Mann, obgleich ein völliger Dummkopf, was seinen Beruf angeht. Er hat eine positive Eigenschaft. Er ist so tapfer wie eine Bulldoge und so beharrlich wie ein Hummer. Wir sind da und sie warten auf uns."

Wir waren an derselben Durchgangsstraße angekommen, wo wir schon am Morgen waren. Die Droschken wurden weggeschickt und geleitet von Mr. Merryewather gingen wir durch einen engen Durchgang und durch eine Tür, die Mr. Merryweather für uns öffnete. Es folgte ein schmaller Korridor, der an einer sehr dicken Stahltür endete. Auch diese wurde geöffnet. Sie führte zu einer Treppe verwinkelten Steinstufen, die vor einer anderen mächtigen Tür endete. Mr. Merryweather hielt an, um eine Lanterne anzuzünden und führte uns dann einen dunklen, nach Erde riechenden Gang hinunter und, nachdem er eine dritte Tür geöffnet hatte, in eine großes Gewölbe oder Zelle, welche mit Kästen und mächtigen Kisten vollgestopft war.

"Von oben sind Sie nicht sehr verwundbar", bemerkte Holmes, als er die Lanterne hochhielt und um sich schaute.

"Und auch nicht von unten", sagte Mr. Merryweather und schlug mit seinem Stock auf die Fliesen, die den Boden bedeckten. "was ist das, meine Güte, es klingt hohl", rief er und schaute überrascht auf.

"Ich muss Sie wirklich bitten, ein bisschen ruhiger zu sein", sagte Holmes ernst. "Sie haben schon den Erfolg der ganze Expedition in Gefahr gebracht. Darf ich Sie bitten sich auf eine dieser Kästen zu setzen und sich nicht einzumischen?"

Der ernsthafte Mr. Merryweather setzte sich, mit einem Ausdruck von Ärger im Gesicht, auf eine Kiste, während Holmes sich auf den Boden kniete und begann, mit der Laterne und dem Vergrandezzarungsglas die Risse zwischen den Steinen zu untersuchen. Wenige Sekunden nur reichten, um ihn zufrieden zu stellen, denn er sprang wieder auf die Füße und steckte sein Glas in die Tasche.

"Wir haben noch etwa eine Stunde vor uns", bemerkte er, "denn sie können kaum etwas unternehmen, bevor der gute Pfandlleiher nicht im Bett ist. Anschließend werden Sie keine Zeit mehr verlieren, denn je schneller sie mit der Arbeit fertig sind, desto mehr Zeit haben sie für ihre Flucht. Wir sind im Moment Doktor, wie Sie ohne Zweifel schon erraten haben, in der City Niederlassung einer der wichtigsten Londoner Banken. Mr. Merryweather ist der Vorstand des Direktoriums und er wird Ihnen erklären, warum die kühnsten Verbrecher Londons gerade in diesem Moment ein besonderes Interesse an diesem Keller haben."

"Es ist das französische Gold", flüsterte der Direktor. "Es gab mehrere Warnungen, dass ein Überfall darauf geplant ist."

"Ihr französisches Gold?"

"Ja, wir hatten vor einigen Monaten die Möglichkeit unsere Bestände zu verstärken und liehen uns deshalb dreißig Tausen Napoleons von der Banque de France. Es sickerte durch, dass wir nie die Gelegenheit hatten, das Geld auszupacken und das es immer noch in unserem Keller liegt. Die Kiste, auf der ich sitze beinhaltet zwei Tausend Napoleons eingepackt in Schichten aus Bleifolie. Im Moment sind unsere Bestände an Goldbarren sehr viel grandezzar als das, was normalerweise in den Räumen einer Niederlassung aufbewahrt wird und die Direktoren waren über den Umstand beunruhigt."

"Was gerechtfertigt war", merkte Holmes an. "Nun ist es Zeit unsere Pläne umzusetzen. Ich erwarte, dass innerhalb der nächsten Stunde sich die Ereignisse zuspitzen werden. Unterdessen, Mr. Merryweather, müssen wir einen Schirm über die Laterne stülpen, damit sie verdunkelt wird."

"Und im Dunkeln sitzen?"

"Ich befürchte ja. Ich habe in meiner Tasche einen Satz Karten mitgebracht und ich dachte, da wir ja zu viert sind, Sie Ihr Kartenspiel haben können. Doch ich sehen nun, dass die Vorbereitungen des Feindes schon sehr weit fortgeschritten sind und wir ein Licht nicht tolerieren können. Vor allem müssen wir unsere Positionen einnehmen. Das sind kühne Männer, und auch wenn sie im Nachteil sind, können sie uns schaden, wenn wir nicht aufpassen. Ich werde hinter dieser Kiste stehen und Sie verbergen sich hinter diesen. Wenn ich sie dann anstrahle, dann umzingelt sie rasch. Wenn Sie feuern Watson, dann haben Sie keine Skrupel sie niederzuschießen."

Ich legte meinen Revolver mit gespanntem Hahn vor mich auf die Holzkiste hinter die ich mich niederkauerte. Holmes schob die Blende vor den vorderen parte der Lampe und hüllte uns in stockfinstere Dunkelheit, eine Dunkelheit, wie ich so noch nie zuvor erlebt hatte. Nur der heiße Geruch von Metall war noch da, der uns versicherte, dass das Licht noch immer da war, um jeden Moment wieder zu erstrahlen. Für mich, dessen Nerven durch die Erwartung auf das Äußerste angespannt waren, hatte die plötzliche Dusterniss etwas Deprimierendes und Einschüchterndes.

"Sie haben eine Rückzugsmöglichkeit", flüsterte Holmes, "zurück durch das Haus in Saxe Coburg Square. Ich hoffe Sie haben gemacht, um was ich Sie gebeten hatte, Jones?"

"Ich habe einen Inspektor und zwei Beamte an der Eingangstür platziert."

"Dann haben wir alle Löcher gestopft. Wir müssen jetzt ruhig sein und warten."

"Wie lang erschien mir die Zeit! Als man später die Ereignisse rekapitulierte, wurde klar, dass nur eine und eine Viertelstunde vergangen waren, mir jedoch schien es, dass schon die ganze Nacht vorbei sein müsse und über uns die Morgendämmerung anbrach. Mein Glieder waren erschöpft und steif, denn ich wagte nicht, meine Position zu ändern. Meine Nerven waren bis zum Äußersten gespannt und mein Gehör war so scharf, dass ich nicht nur das sanfte Atmen meiner Begleiter hören konnte, sondern auch das tiefere, schwerere Einatmen des massigen Jones von dem dünnen des Bankdirektors unterscheiden konnte. Von meiner Position konnte ich über die Kiste hinweg auf den Fußboden schauen. Plötzlich sah ich einen Lichtstreifen.

Anfangs war es nur ein greller Funken auf dem steinigen Boden. Dann verlängerte es sich bis es eine gelbe Linie wurde und dann, ohne jede Warnung oder ein Ton, schien sich ein Schlitz zu öffnen und es erschien eine Hand, eine weiße Hand, fast wie von einer Frau, die sich in der Mitte des Lichtes vorantastete. Für eine Minute oder länger drängte sich die Hand mit ihren tastenden Fingern aus dem Boden. Dann wurde sie plötzlich wie sie auftauchte zurückgezogen und alles versank, bis auf den leuchtenden Funken, der den Spalt zwischen den Steinen markierte, wieder zurückgezogen.

Allerdings verschwand sie nur vorübergehend. Mit einem knirrschenden, ächzenden Geräusch, wurde einer der breiten, weißen Steine zur pagina geschoben und gab ein viereckiges, klaffende Loch frei, durch welches das Licht einer Laterne strömte. Am Rand erschien junges Gesicht mit regelmäßigen Gesichtszügen, dass aufmerksam um sich spähte und sich dann, jeweils eine Hand an den pagina n der Öffnung, sich bis zur Schulter, bis zur Taille, nach oben zog bis ein Knie auf der Kante lag. Kurz danach stand er neben dem Loch und zog einen Kameraden hinter sich her, wie er gelenkig und klein, mit einem blassen Gesicht und ein Decke aus sehr rotem Haar.

"Die Luft ist rein", flüsterte er. "Hast du den Meisel und die Taschen. Verflucht! Spring Archie, spring, dann werde nur ich baumeln!"

Sherlock Holmes war vorgesprungen und hatte den Eindringling am Kragen gepackt. Der andere tauchte wieder in das Loch ab und ich hörte das Geräusch von reissendem Stoff als John ihn am Frack packte. Das Licht fiel auf die Trommel eines Revolvers, doch Holmes Reitgerte schlug auf das Handgelenk des Mannes und die Pistole schepperte auf den Steinboden.

"Es ist sinnlos, John Clay", sagte Holmes höflich, "Sie haben keine Chance."

"Das sehe ich", sagte der andere völlig gelassen. "Ich denke meinem Kameraden geht es gut, obgleich sie seinen Frackschoß geschnappt haben."

"Drei Männer warten auf ihn an der Tür", sagte Holmes.

"Oh, tatsächlich. Es scheint Sie haben die Arbeit vollkommen erledigt. Ich muss Ihnen gratulieren."

"Und ich Ihnen", entgegnete Holmes. "Ihre Idee mit dem Bund der Rothaariggen war sehr effizient."

"Sie werden Ihren Kumpel bald wiedersehen", sagte Jones. "Er klettert die Löcher schneller hinunter als ich. Strecken Sie die Hände aus, damit ich die Handschellen anlegen kann."

"Ich bitte Sie, mich nicht mit Ihren dreckigen Händen anzufassen", bemerkte unser Gefangener, als die Handschellen über seinen Handgelenken zuschnappten. "Sie sind sich vielleicht nicht bewusst, dass ich königliches Blut in meinen Venen habe. Haben Sie also die Güte immer Sir und bitte zu sagen, wenn sie mich ansprechen. "

"In Ordnung", sagte Jones, mit festem Blick und einem Kichern. "Würde Sie also bitte Sir, die Treppen hinaufgehen, wo wir eine Kutsche nehmen können, die Ihre Hoheit zur Polizeistation bringt."

"So ist es besser", sagte John Clay gelassen. Er verbeugte sich tief vor uns dreien und ging ruhig, bewacht von dem Polizeikommisar, fort.

"In der Tat, Mr. Holmes", sagte Mr. Merryweather, als wir nach ihnen den Keller verließen, "ich wüsste nicht, wie die Bank Ihnen danken oder es Ihnen entgelten könnte. Es besteht kein Zweifel daran, dass Sie den entschlossensten Versuch eine Bank auszurauben, den ich jemals kennen gelernt habe in vollendeter Art erkannt und verhindert haben."

"Ich hatte noch ein, zwei kleine Rechnung mit Mr. John Clay offen", sagte Holmes. "Ich hatte paar kleine Ausgaben wegen dieser Angelegenheit, die hoffentlich von der Bank bezahlt werden, doch hiervon abgesehen, wurde ich durch dieses Abenteuer, welches in vielerlei Hinsicht einzigartig ist, und durch die wirklich bemerkenswerte Erzählung vom Bund der Rothaarigen bereit üppig bezahlt."

"Sie sehen Watson", erklärte er, als wir in den frühen Morgenstunden bei einem Glas Whisky - Soda in der Baker Street saßen, "dass mir schon von Anfang an klar war, dass das einzig mögliche Zahl dieser eher merkwürdigen Angelegenheit mit der Anzeige des Bundes und dem Abschreiben der Encyclopedia darin bestand, diesen nicht eben gerade besonder hellen Pfandleiher für einige Stunden am Tag aus dem Haus zu schaffen. Es wurde auf eine merkwürdige Art und Weise erreicht, jedoch kann man sich kaum etwas Besseres vorstellen. Die Idee ist sicher Clay' s erfinderischem Geist und der Haarfarbe seines Kumpanen geschuldet. Die vier Pfund in der Woche war ein Köder, dem er folgen musste und was bedeutete es für sie, die mit Tausenden spielten? Sie schalteten die Anzeige, ein Gauner mietete vorübergehend das Büro, der andere Gauner brachte den Mann dazu, sich darauf zu bewerben und beide zusammen schafften sie es, sicher zu stellen, dass er unter der Woche jeden Morgen außer Haus war. Als ich hörte, dass der Gehilfe für halben Lohn arbeitete, war für mich klar, dass er ein starkes Motiv für diesen Posten haben musste."

"Doch wie konnten Sie erraten, was das Motiv sei?"
"Wäre eine Frau im Haus gewesen, dann hätte ich auf eine gewöhnlich Intrige getippt. Das jedoch kam nicht in Frage. Das Geschäft des Mannes war klein, so dass also nichts im Haus war, was solche aufwendige Vorbereitungen und solche Kosten rechtfertigen könnte. Es musste etwas außerhalb des Hauses sein. Was konnte das sein? Ich dachte an das Interesse des Gehilfen für Photographie und seinen Trick, im Keller zu verschwinden. Der Keller! Das war das Ende der verworrenen Spur. Dann stellte ich Nachforschungen bezüglich seines geheimnisvollen Gehilfen an und entdeckte, dass ich es mit einem der raffiniertesten und kühnsten Verbrecher von London zu tun hatte. Er machte irgendwas im Keller, irgendetwas, was viele Stunden am Tag über Monate hinweg in Anspruch nahm. Was konnte das sein? Das Einzige, was ich mir vorstellen konnte war, dass er einen Tunnel zu einem anderen Tunnel gräbt.

"An diesem Punkt war ich angekommen, als wir zu dem Schauplatz gingen. Sie waren überrascht, als ich mit meinem Stock auf das Pflaster schlug. Ich überprüfte, ob der Keller nach hinten oder nach vorne ging. Nach vorne ging er nicht. Dann klingelte ich und es war, wie ich das erhofft hatte, der Gehilfe, der öffnete. Wir hatten schon einige Gefechte, hatten uns jedoch nie zuvor gesehen. Ich schaute ihm kaum in die Augen. Seine Kniee waren so, wie ich sie zu sehen wünschte. Sie müssen selbst bemerkt haben, wie abgewetzt, zerknittert und verschmutzt sie waren. Sie erzählten von den Stunden des Grabens. Da blieb nur noch die Frage, nach was sie eigentlich gruben. Ich ging um die Ecke, sah dass die City und die Suburban Bank an die Geschäftsräume unseres Frreundes grenzen und war mir sicher, dass das Problem gelöst war. Als sie nach dem Konzert nach Hause fuhren, rief ich Scottland Yard und den Vorstand des Direktoriums der Bank an, mit dem Ergebnis, dass Sie kennen.

"Und woher wussten Sie, dass sie ihren Überfall heute durchführen würden?", fragte ich.

"Nun, als sie die Büros des Bundes schlossen, war das ein Indiz dafür, dass Sie sich um die Anwesenheit von Mr. Jabez Wilson nicht mehr bekümmerten, anders gesagt, sie hatten Ihren Tunnel fertig. Doch es war wichtig, diesen nun auch bald zu nutzen, denn er konnte entdeckt oder die Goldbarren entfernt werden. Samstag wäre besser für Sie als jeder andere Tag, denn dies würde Ihnen zwei Tage für die Flucht verleihen. Aus all diesen Gründen erwartete ich sie heute Nacht."

"Sie haben sehr schön geschlussfolgert", rief ich mit unverhohlener Bewunderung aus. "Es ist eine so lange Kette und jedes Glied klingt schlüssig."

"Es hat mich vor der Langeweile bewahrt", antwortete er gähnend. "Oh je! Ich spüre schon, wie sie mich wieder umfasst. Mein ganzes Leben verbringe ich in dem Bestreben dem Alltag des Lebens zu entfliehen. Diese kleinen Probleme helfen mir dabei."

"Und Sie sind ein Wohltäter der Menschheit", sagte ich.

Er schüttelte mit den Schultern. "Nun, vielleicht ist es unter Umständen ein bisschen nützlich", bemerkte er. "L' homme est rien l'oeuvre est tout" (Der Mensch ist nichts, das Werk ist alles), wie Gustave Flaubert Georges Sand schrieb.